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Garry Templeton

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SPORTS
March 29, 1991 | DAVE DISTEL
Greg Riddoch is somewhat of a mystery man as a manager. School is still out on the substitute teacher from Greeley, Colo. He knows this as well as anybody. The Padre players do not yet know what to make of him. He seems a study in contradictions, outgoing but guarded. He comes out of his corner office for forays through the clubhouse, kibitzing and joking and encouraging.
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SPORTS
May 30, 1992 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"This way," Garry Templeton says, veering toward his right after answering the door. "We might as well sit in here. This room never gets used." Templeton never walked so much as glided, and his silky smooth moves are as graceful as ever. Even in retirement, as he walks into the living room of his custom-built, 6,500-square-foot house, he covers ground more smoothly than the Porsche that sits in his garage.
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SPORTS
March 31, 1986 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
On his 30th birthday last week, Garry Templeton spent the day with his wife and kids. Wife Glenda was by his side, sons Garry Jr., 7, and 4-year-old Gerome (who wore red shades) were playing ball nearby, and baby daughter Genae Nicole sat on his lap. On the day after his 30th birthday, Garry Templeton spent time with another kid, 22-year-old Padre Bip Roberts. "Bip," Templeton was saying, "don't just slap at the ball when you're batting left-handed. Drive it!"
SPORTS
May 29, 1992 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"This way," Garry Templeton says, veering toward his right after answering the door. "We might as well sit in here. This room never gets used." Templeton never walked so much as glided, and his silky smooth moves are as graceful as ever. Even in retirement, as he walks into the living room of his custom-built, 6,500-square-foot house, he covers ground more smoothly than the Porsche that sits in his garage.
SPORTS
June 29, 1985 | DAVE DISTEL, Times Staff Writer
Garry Templeton is so cool it's hard to imagine he would work up a sweat playing handball in a sauna. He is as calm as elevator music. He is, of course, a shortstop, the eye of the storm in the middle of a baseball diamond. Yet Templeton could almost wear a three-piece suit to work, and not often send it to the cleaners. When he stands at the plate, he looks as if he is waiting for an ambling bus rather than a 90 m.p.h. fast ball.
SPORTS
April 3, 1987 | CHRIS COBBS, Times Staff Writer
This is a season of changes for the Padres. The club appears headed for a new owner, George Argyros. There's a new manager, Larry Bowa. There's also a new catcher, Benito Santiago; a new center fielder, Stan Jefferson; a new third baseman, Kevin Mitchell, and a new second baseman, Joey Cora. There is a new captain, as well. His name is Garry Templeton. Teammates have looked up to him for years, making it natural for Bowa to officially name him captain.
SPORTS
April 4, 1990 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pain sent shivers of concern up and down his body Tuesday, causing tears to drip from his eyes. Padre third baseman Bip Roberts bit his lower lip, put a bulky brace on his right knee, wiped away the tears, and ran back onto the field. Roberts, who developed swelling in his right knee that just won't seem to go away, knew he probably shouldn't be going back onto the field. It's only spring training. Why take a risk?
SPORTS
May 30, 1992 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"This way," Garry Templeton says, veering toward his right after answering the door. "We might as well sit in here. This room never gets used." Templeton never walked so much as glided, and his silky smooth moves are as graceful as ever. Even in retirement, as he walks into the living room of his custom-built, 6,500-square-foot house, he covers ground more smoothly than the Porsche that sits in his garage.
SPORTS
October 25, 1989 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was plenty to keep Mark Davis busy Tuesday at his Scottsdale, Ariz. home, with nine holes of golf in the early afternoon, and a dinner with his wife celebrating their eighth wedding anniversary in the evening. It was a thorough day of entertainment, particularly considering that teammate Dave Leiper paid for the anniversary dinner. Leiper had the misfortune of betting Davis that their former teammate, Kevin Mitchell, would not hit 40 home runs this year for the San Francisco Giants.
SPORTS
June 26, 1990 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Garry Templeton felt a sharp pain, as if someone stabbed him in the gut Monday afternoon, as the words tumbled out of Padre Manager Jack McKeon's mouth. McKeon kept talking, but Templeton didn't hear a thing, fighting to regain his senses. Everything suddenly had become a blur. His entire 14-year career began flashing through his mind: He thought about his days with the St. Louis Cardinals . . . his two All-Star appearances . . . the three years he batted over .300 . . .
SPORTS
July 13, 1991 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Padres stared at him from the bench Friday night, looking peculiarly at the guy wearing the pinstripe uniform with orange and blue trim. They were confused. It was as if the image in their mind wouldn't conform to what they were seeing. Garry Templeton wasn't supposed to be wearing a New York Mets uniform. He was destined to retire a Padre, remember? He wasn't supposed to be wearing No. 11. His uniform was No. 1.
SPORTS
June 21, 1991 | MARK HERRMAN, NEWSDAY
It would have been natural to wonder how Garry Templeton would react to being uprooted. His reputation was grounded in stability and fixed at shortstop. Before this season, he had played 1,923 games at that position, more than any other active player, and only two anywhere else, both at third base. That makes his past three weeks with the New York Mets so striking. He has displayed an altogether different kind of range.
SPORTS
May 30, 1991 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
The Padres have given infielder Garry Templeton assurances they will not stand in his way of a trade. They've notified every team in the major leagues that Templeton is available for a bargain-basement price. Templeton and his agent, Richie Bry, have been told they can contact clubs on their own. Templeton, who has not started a game since May 1, is being used almost primarily as a left-handed pinch-hitter, hardly the role he envisioned.
SPORTS
May 13, 1991 | BOB WOLF
Garry Templeton could see it coming, but he had no idea that it would be this bad. The Padre veteran, 35, recalled Sunday that Jack McKeon, then manager/general manager, had broached the subject of a utility role two years ago. He said he thought he would play a lot more under those conditions than he has this season as a reserve for the first time in his 16-year major league career. "McKeon told me that if he got a shortstop, he wanted me to play utility," Templeton said.
SPORTS
April 8, 1991 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thwack! Ground ball. "Get it, Bip!" Garry Templeton yelled. Thwack! Ground ball. "Forget it!" Templeton yelled. The sun was bright and the Padres were getting ready for their final exhibition game. A few minutes passed. Templeton's turn in the batting cage finished. "I'll take some grounders at third," he said to nobody in particular. He grabbed his glove and trotted away. Introducing Garry Templeton, utility man.
SPORTS
April 7, 1991 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Catcher Brian Dorsett received word after Saturday's 6-5 Padre exhibition loss to Seattle that he was the final Padre cut of the spring, thus ensuring Garry Templeton a spot on the opening day 25-man roster. Earlier Saturday, the Padres optioned outfielder Jim Vatcher and pitchers Adam Peterson and Steve Rosenberg to triple-A Las Vegas. But the big news came after the game--and it surprised Templeton, the Padres' all-time leader in games played. "I didn't think I'd be here," Templeton said.
SPORTS
April 6, 1991
Apparently Greg Riddoch will do anything to be free of potential criticism from veteran Garry Templeton. Rookie Manager Riddoch has undertaken a course of childish mind games with Tempy in an attempt to diminish his performance on the field. Riddoch is so bent on releasing Tempy he has stooped to playing him in B games and in the outfield. Dave Distel hit it right on the mark with his article "Garry Templeton Deserves Better." Tempy has been a clutch performer over the years and has the talent to contribute as an excellent utility player.
SPORTS
April 6, 1991
Apparently Greg Riddoch will do anything to be free of potential criticism from veteran Garry Templeton. Rookie Manager Riddoch has undertaken a course of childish mind games with Tempy in an attempt to diminish his performance on the field. Riddoch is so bent on releasing Tempy he has stooped to playing him in B games and in the outfield. Dave Distel hit it right on the mark with his article "Garry Templeton Deserves Better." Tempy has been a clutch performer over the years and has the talent to contribute as an excellent utility player.
SPORTS
March 29, 1991 | DAVE DISTEL
Greg Riddoch is somewhat of a mystery man as a manager. School is still out on the substitute teacher from Greeley, Colo. He knows this as well as anybody. The Padre players do not yet know what to make of him. He seems a study in contradictions, outgoing but guarded. He comes out of his corner office for forays through the clubhouse, kibitzing and joking and encouraging.
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