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February 17, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
  Hall of Fame catcher Gary Carter, who died Thursday at 57, was one of the best clutch players of all time. Never was that on display as much as his final at-bat in the majors. Carter had returned to the team he started with, the Montreal Expos, for his final season. His final game came on Sept. 27, 1992. In the seventh inning of a scoreless game against the Chicago Cubs, Carter lined an 0-2 pitch over the right fielder's head to score Larry Walker with what turned out to be the only run of the game.
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February 20, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
The late Gary Carter, who died last week at the age of 57, was an icon in Montreal. A longtime catcher for the Montreal Expos, he was beloved in the city. Unfortunately, there is no pro baseball team in Montreal anymore, with the Expos moving Washington, D.C., to become the Nationals before the 2005 season. Carter's number had been retired by the Expos before the team moved, however, and with no baseball team in town anymore, the banner with his number was moved to the home of the NHL's Montreal Canadiens, the Bell Center.
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SPORTS
February 20, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
The late Gary Carter, who died last week at the age of 57, was an icon in Montreal. A longtime catcher for the Montreal Expos, he was beloved in the city. Unfortunately, there is no pro baseball team in Montreal anymore, with the Expos moving Washington, D.C., to become the Nationals before the 2005 season. Carter's number had been retired by the Expos before the team moved, however, and with no baseball team in town anymore, the banner with his number was moved to the home of the NHL's Montreal Canadiens, the Bell Center.
SPORTS
February 17, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
  Hall of Fame catcher Gary Carter, who died Thursday at 57, was one of the best clutch players of all time. Never was that on display as much as his final at-bat in the majors. Carter had returned to the team he started with, the Montreal Expos, for his final season. His final game came on Sept. 27, 1992. In the seventh inning of a scoreless game against the Chicago Cubs, Carter lined an 0-2 pitch over the right fielder's head to score Larry Walker with what turned out to be the only run of the game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna, Los Angeles Times
Gary Carter, a Hall of Fame catcher from Fullerton who helped lift the New York Mets to a dramatic victory over the Boston Red Sox in the 1986 World Series, died Thursday in Florida. He was 57 and had brain cancer. Nicknamed "Kid" for his grit and youthful exuberance, Carter was an 11-time All-Star who hit .262 with 324 home runs and 1,225 runs batted in during 19 seasons playing for the Montreal Expos, Mets, San Francisco Giants and Dodgers. His goal to become a major league manager unfulfilled, Carter was coaching at Palm Beach Atlantic University near his Florida home last May when he experienced headaches and forgetfulness and was diagnosed with brain cancer.
SPORTS
August 2, 2011 | Wire reports
Hall of Fame catcher Gary Carter received some positive news regarding his cancer treament, his daughter reported on the family website. An MRI exam revealed that Carter's brain tumors are "80 percent better," Kimmy Bloemers , Carter's daughter, wrote on the website, ESPNNewYork.com reported Tuesday. She added that there is much less swelling and the tumors are less dense. Carter is scheduled to start treatment that will require five days of chemotherapy in a pill form.
SPORTS
June 28, 1994 | Times staff writer David W. Myers catches up with former Dodgers and Angels
Carter played only one season in Los Angeles, 1991, but he got into 101 games while platooning with fellow catcher Mike Scioscia. The former three-sport standout at Sunny Hills High in Fullerton was signed as a free agent the next year by Montreal--where he had begun his career in 1974--and retired at the end of the 1992 season having caught more games, 2,056, than any other player in National League history. Carter, 40, lives in Florida and is the color commentator on the Marlins' telecasts.
SPORTS
February 16, 2012 | By Chris Dufresne
"February made me shiver, with every paper I'd deliver. Bad news on the doorstep …" Don McLean sang those words in his classic song, "American Pie," as he reflected on the plane-crash death of rock star Buddy Holly. Bad news hit the step again Thursday with sad news of Gary Carter's death, from cancer, at age 57. February, again, made us quiver. Long ago, Carter used to deliver the news, good and bad, on his bike. You may remember Carter as a Hall of Fame catcher for the Montreal Expos and New York Mets and a signature player in the classic 1986 World Series.
SPORTS
January 23, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Gary Carter, 36, accepted the Dodgers' invitation to spring training Tuesday, agreeing to sign a one-year, $500,000 contract if he makes the team as the backup catcher to Mike Scioscia. The 11-time all-star was allowed to leave the San Francisco Giants as a free agent last year after hitting .254 in 244 at-bats with nine home runs and 27 runs batted in. Carter will compete for the backup job with Barry Lyons, who had been his backup on the New York Mets.
SPORTS
October 14, 1988
New York Mets catcher Gary Carter, who hit .222 (6 for 27) in the National League playoff loss to the Dodgers, was baseball's highest-paid player this season with earnings of $2,360,714, according to a survey by USA Today. Carter's income included $200,000 in bonuses, and he was 1 of 11 major leaguers to earn $2 million or more. Seventy-one players earned at least $1 million. St. Louis shortstop Ozzie Smith was No. 2 on the list with earnings of $2,340,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna, Los Angeles Times
Gary Carter, a Hall of Fame catcher from Fullerton who helped lift the New York Mets to a dramatic victory over the Boston Red Sox in the 1986 World Series, died Thursday in Florida. He was 57 and had brain cancer. Nicknamed "Kid" for his grit and youthful exuberance, Carter was an 11-time All-Star who hit .262 with 324 home runs and 1,225 runs batted in during 19 seasons playing for the Montreal Expos, Mets, San Francisco Giants and Dodgers. His goal to become a major league manager unfulfilled, Carter was coaching at Palm Beach Atlantic University near his Florida home last May when he experienced headaches and forgetfulness and was diagnosed with brain cancer.
SPORTS
February 16, 2012 | By Chris Dufresne
"February made me shiver, with every paper I'd deliver. Bad news on the doorstep …" Don McLean sang those words in his classic song, "American Pie," as he reflected on the plane-crash death of rock star Buddy Holly. Bad news hit the step again Thursday with sad news of Gary Carter's death, from cancer, at age 57. February, again, made us quiver. Long ago, Carter used to deliver the news, good and bad, on his bike. You may remember Carter as a Hall of Fame catcher for the Montreal Expos and New York Mets and a signature player in the classic 1986 World Series.
SPORTS
January 19, 2012 | Staff and wire reports
The Oklahoma City Thunder signed All-Star point guard Russell Westbrook to a multiyear contract extension on Thursday. Westbrook was set to become a restricted free agent at the end of the season, meaning the Thunder would have had to match any offer he received from another team if it wanted to keep him. Instead, it locked him up with a new deal 15 games into this season. Terms were not disclosed, but Yahoo Sports reported the deal was worth $80 million over five years. Oklahoma City has the best record in the Western Conference, with Westbrook averaging 20.5 points, 5.5 assists and 5.0 rebounds.
SPORTS
August 2, 2011 | Wire reports
Hall of Fame catcher Gary Carter received some positive news regarding his cancer treament, his daughter reported on the family website. An MRI exam revealed that Carter's brain tumors are "80 percent better," Kimmy Bloemers , Carter's daughter, wrote on the website, ESPNNewYork.com reported Tuesday. She added that there is much less swelling and the tumors are less dense. Carter is scheduled to start treatment that will require five days of chemotherapy in a pill form.
SPORTS
June 24, 2008 | T.J. SIMERS
I don't know Gary Carter. Never met the guy until Monday. I know he's a Hall of Fame catcher, a Dodger for a season, born in Culver City, raised in Fullerton, a local high school field named for him, the most accommodating player to fans and media, but a controversial figure in New York recently and working now as manager of the Orange County Flyers.
SPORTS
July 28, 2003 | Ross Newhan, Times Staff Writer
A crowd estimated at 18,000, including former president George Bush, saluted the Hall of Fame induction of Gary Carter and Eddie Murray on Sunday, but it was the pinch-hitting of Johnny Bench and ad-libbing of Bob Uecker that seemed to steal the show. Bench, the Hall of Fame catcher, delivered a more than credible rendition of the Canadian National Anthem when Daniel Rodriguez, the scheduled singer, was unable to reach Cooperstown because of weather conditions.
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July 13, 1986 | United Press International
Gary Carter has a simple recipe for being popular with fans. Start with a large helping of a love for baseball. Sprinkle in 11 1/2 seasons of success on the field. Finally, top it off with 210 pounds of Gary Carter. "I love the game. I love the game of baseball," says Carter, who drew 1,476,141 votes to lead the balloting for the National League's starting catcher in the All-Star Game in Houston Tuesday night.
SPORTS
March 12, 1989 | CLAIRE SMITH, The Hartford Courant
Gary Carter was sitting around discussing the pugilistic efforts of two of his New York Mets teammates when he paused and said, "You know, I've never had a fight in my life, even when I was a little kid. I don't believe in fighting." Carter paused, smiled that Grand Canyon smile, then said, "But, you know, my friends tell me that knowing what they know about me, if I ever did get into a fight, the other guy would probably have to kill me to stop me." Again came the Carter grin.
SPORTS
July 27, 2003 | John Kekis, Associated Press
Outwardly, they couldn't have been more different: Eddie Murray, the silent slugger, and Gary Carter, the nonstop-talking and smiling "Kid." Yet their lives have been almost mirror images: Both were born in the Los Angeles area just two years apart; both were picked on the third round of the major league baseball draft; both played for the New York Mets and Los Angeles Dodgers; and both played on one world champion. And on Sunday, both will enter the Baseball Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
July 26, 2003 | Ross Newhan, Times Staff Writer
The catcher known as the Kid was seldom without a smile, a few dozen words and an optimistic attitude, all of which is magnified now as he prepares to be inducted into the Hall of Fame at Cooperstown, N.Y., on Sunday.
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