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Gary Devore

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NEWS
July 9, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN and SCOTT GLOVER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A puzzle that has haunted Hollywood for more than a year, the disappearance of screenwriter Gary Devore, was apparently solved Wednesday when an armchair detective, saying he was guided only by a newspaper account of the mystery, led investigators to Devore's car submerged in an aqueduct near Palmdale, with a body still at the wheel. Divers found a partially decomposed body dressed in blue jeans, a Western-style shirt and cowboy boots--matching the clothes worn by Devore when he disappeared.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1999
Screenwriter Gary Devore's widow has sued the state Department of Transportation over his 1997 fatal plunge into the California Aqueduct, charging that dangerous conditions in the road led to his death, according to her lawyer. Devore, who authorities said was fatigued and disoriented after driving for 12 hours on his way home to Carpinteria from Santa Fe, N.M., got on the Antelope Valley Freeway headed north in the southbound lanes and drove off the road into the aqueduct.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1998 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unemployed attorney with an engineering degree and a taste for true crime novels is the mysterious armchair detective who on a hunch led authorities to a section of the California Aqueduct where divers recovered what is believed to be the body of Gary Devore, the screenwriter who had been missing for more than a year. While now an instant celebrity, Douglas Crawford said nobody believed him at first. "They told me that unless I killed the guy, call back Monday," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1999 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Screenwriter Gary Devore's widow has sued the state Department of Transportation over his 1997 fatal plunge into the California Aqueduct, claiming dangerous conditions on the road led to his death, according to her lawyer. Devore, who authorities said was fatigued and disoriented after driving for 12 hours on his way home to Carpinteria from Santa Fe, N.M., got on the Antelope Valley (14) Freeway headed north in the southbound lanes and accidentally drove off the road and into the aqueduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1998 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using dental records, Los Angeles County coroner's investigators on Friday identified the body of screenwriter Gary Devore, whose partially decomposed corpse was pulled from the California Aqueduct earlier this week after an amateur sleuth led detectives to the site. Coroner's Capt. Dean Gilmour said authorities have not determined exactly how Devore died, but that the autopsy did not show any obvious signs he had been shot, stabbed or beaten.
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Possibly disoriented from more than a dozen hours on the road, Gary Devore may have been driving in the wrong direction on the Antelope Valley Freeway before plunging headlong into an unprotected section of the California Aqueduct. That scenario is among several that have emerged in the investigation by the California Highway Patrol into the death of the Carpinteria screenwriter. "It's one of the theories they are looking at," said CHP spokesman Rhett Price.
NEWS
July 9, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN and SCOTT GLOVER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A puzzle that has haunted Hollywood for more than a year, the disappearance of screenwriter Gary Devore, was apparently solved Wednesday when an armchair detective, saying he was guided only by a newspaper account of the mystery, led investigators to Devore's vehicle submerged in an aqueduct near Palmdale, with a body still at the wheel. Divers found a partially decomposed body dressed in blue jeans, a Western-style shirt and cowboy boots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1998 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disoriented from a dozen hours on the road, screenwriter Gary Devore was driving in the wrong direction on the Antelope Valley Freeway before plunging to his death in the California Aqueduct last year, according to the results of a California Highway Patrol investigation released Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1998 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere during his drive home, perhaps along a stretch of highway in the Mojave Desert known for bikers, methamphetamine labs, chop shops and mine shafts too numerous to count, screenwriter Gary Devore's voice drifted over a cellular phone in the wee hours of June 28, 1997. "Was that you trying to call me, sweetie?" Devore asked his wife, Wendy Oates-Devore, who was waiting for him at their beachfront home in Carpinteria. "Who else would it be at 1 o'clock in the morning?" she asked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1999 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Screenwriter Gary Devore's widow has sued the state Department of Transportation over his 1997 fatal plunge into the California Aqueduct, claiming dangerous conditions on the road led to his death, according to her lawyer. Devore, who authorities said was fatigued and disoriented after driving for 12 hours on his way home to Carpinteria from Santa Fe, N.M., got on the Antelope Valley (14) Freeway headed north in the southbound lanes and accidentally drove off the road and into the aqueduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1998 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disoriented from a dozen hours on the road, screenwriter Gary Devore was driving in the wrong direction on the Antelope Valley Freeway before plunging to his death in the California Aqueduct last year, according to the results of a California Highway Patrol investigation released Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1998 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disoriented from a dozen hours on the road, screenwriter Gary Devore was driving the wrong direction on the Antelope Valley Freeway before he plunged to his death in the California Aqueduct last year, according to the results of a California Highway Patrol investigation released Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sheriff's deputies Tuesday resumed searching the California Aqueduct where screenwriter Gary Devore's car was found, looking for a gun he reportedly had with him when he disappeared. The car, with Devore's body still at the wheel, was found July 8 submerged in the concrete channel where its waters flow beneath the Antelope Valley Freeway. He had been missing since June 28, 1997, when he disappeared while driving to his Santa Barbara County home from Santa Fe, N.M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1998 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Possibly disoriented from more than a dozen hours on the road, Gary Devore may have been driving in the wrong direction on the Antelope Valley Freeway before plunging headlong into an unprotected section of the California Aqueduct. That scenario is among several that have emerged in the investigation by the California Highway Patrol into the death of the Carpinteria screenwriter. "It's one of the theories they are looking at," said CHP spokesman Rhett Price.
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Possibly disoriented from more than a dozen hours on the road, Gary Devore may have been driving in the wrong direction on the Antelope Valley Freeway before plunging headlong into an unprotected section of the California Aqueduct. That scenario is among several that have emerged in the investigation by the California Highway Patrol into the death of the Carpinteria screenwriter. "It's one of the theories they are looking at," said CHP spokesman Rhett Price.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1998 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The highly praised amateur sleuth whose investigation led authorities to the body of missing screenwriter Gary Devore has hired a criminal defense attorney, saying he now fears being viewed as a possible suspect. "I don't want to be Richard Jewell-ed," Douglas Crawford said Monday, referring to the security guard who was first hailed as a hero in the aftermath of the 1996 Atlanta Olympics bombing, only to be falsely named as a suspect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sheriff's deputies Tuesday resumed searching the California Aqueduct where screenwriter Gary Devore's car was found, looking for a gun he reportedly had with him when he disappeared. The car, with Devore's body still at the wheel, was found July 8 submerged in the concrete channel where its waters flow beneath the Antelope Valley Freeway. He had been missing since June 28, 1997, when he disappeared while driving to his Santa Barbara County home from Santa Fe, N.M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1998 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Possibly disoriented from more than a dozen hours on the road, Gary Devore may have been driving in the wrong direction on the Antelope Valley Freeway before plunging headlong into an unprotected section of the California Aqueduct. That scenario is among several that have emerged in the investigation by the California Highway Patrol into the death of the Carpinteria screenwriter. "It's one of the theories they are looking at," said CHP spokesman Rhett Price.
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