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Gary Foster

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February 1, 1986 | A. JAMES LISKA
Why Gary Foster remains a virtual unknown is one of the great mysteries of the jazz world. After a long and distinguished career as an extraordinary alto saxophonist--a superb player graced with unfailing tone, expert technique and impeccable taste--he combines both cool and hot schools of playing into an emotive style all his own.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They should name a river after Gary Foster. The alto saxophonist who played at the Kikuya Restaurant on Saturday as the guest of guitarist Doug MacDonald's trio has a natural, flowing style that's as wide and compelling as the Mississippi itself. Which isn't to say that Foster plays riverboat Dixieland. He trades mainly in be-bop, bringing a free-floating improvisational style that reflects the influence of the Lennie Tristano school.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1991 | ZAN STEWART
The Los Angeles-based reedman here reveals his estimable musicality. Foster's alto saxophone sound, liquid and luminescent, graces a very relaxed "Nica's Dream" and a gutsy "Teef"--the leader and bassist John Heard share the melody. Foster's dusky, spherical alto flute tone sparks Jimmy Rowles' haunting ballad "The Peacocks." The rarely heard Rowles offers his idiosyncratic, percussive style in both accompanying and solo chairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE
The art of the jazz improviser is much like that of the storyteller. Both seek to keep the listener engaged with a developing plot, colorful descriptions and unexpected twists, all presented with just the right amount of flair and drama. In one sense, the musical improviser has a more difficult task, since he must imply meaning with sound, rather than relate it directly with words.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Woodwind doubler?" An unusual, colorful bird painted by John James Audubon, or perhaps a long lost character out of Dickens novel? Nope. The two words describe a musician who plays a variety of woodwind instruments in film, television and recording studios. One such artist is Gary Foster, who brings his jazz quintet to the Hyatt Newporter tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1992 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ah, the pleasures of jazz on a warm summer evening. Saxophonist Gary Foster's program at the Hyatt Newporter Friday night had all the right elements--a first-rate jazz quintet, an attractive selection of tunes, and a gorgeous hillside location, cooled by an ocean breeze and highlighted by the setting sun. Foster made the most of the opportunity. Tall, sturdy-looking, beginning to gray around the edges, the 56-year-old veteran played with precise articulateness.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
Central Park West, the Brentwood bar and grill where good sounds are on tap Thursday through Sundays, confines its presentations to duos and trios. How much can be accomplished within these limitations was well defined Sunday when pianist Alan Broadbent appeared with alto saxophonist Gary Foster. Clearly this instrumentation could have benefited from the addition of a bass player, yet the two men seemed remarkably self-sufficient.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They should name a river after Gary Foster. The alto saxophonist who played at the Kikuya Restaurant on Saturday as the guest of guitarist Doug MacDonald's trio has a natural, flowing style that's as wide and compelling as the Mississippi itself. Which isn't to say that Foster plays riverboat Dixieland. He trades mainly in be-bop, bringing a free-floating improvisational style that reflects the influence of the Lennie Tristano school.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE
The art of the jazz improviser is much like that of the storyteller. Both seek to keep the listener engaged with a developing plot, colorful descriptions and unexpected twists, all presented with just the right amount of flair and drama. In one sense, the musical improviser has a more difficult task, since he must imply meaning with sound, rather than relate it directly with words.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1996
The Los Angeles Jazz Society and the Jazz Bakery are co-sponsoring a tribute to Shelly Manne Sunday at 8 p.m. at the club, 3233 Helms Ave., Culver City. Such compatriots of the late drummer as Chuck Berghofer, Conte Candoli, Gary Foster, Joe La Barbera, Mike Wofford and Jazz Bakery owner Ruth Price will be among those performing Manne's original arrangements, provided by his widow, Flip.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1992 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ah, the pleasures of jazz on a warm summer evening. Saxophonist Gary Foster's program at the Hyatt Newporter Friday night had all the right elements--a first-rate jazz quintet, an attractive selection of tunes, and a gorgeous hillside location, cooled by an ocean breeze and highlighted by the setting sun. Foster made the most of the opportunity. Tall, sturdy-looking, beginning to gray around the edges, the 56-year-old veteran played with precise articulateness.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Woodwind doubler?" An unusual, colorful bird painted by John James Audubon, or perhaps a long lost character out of Dickens novel? Nope. The two words describe a musician who plays a variety of woodwind instruments in film, television and recording studios. One such artist is Gary Foster, who brings his jazz quintet to the Hyatt Newporter tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1991 | ZAN STEWART
The Los Angeles-based reedman here reveals his estimable musicality. Foster's alto saxophone sound, liquid and luminescent, graces a very relaxed "Nica's Dream" and a gutsy "Teef"--the leader and bassist John Heard share the melody. Foster's dusky, spherical alto flute tone sparks Jimmy Rowles' haunting ballad "The Peacocks." The rarely heard Rowles offers his idiosyncratic, percussive style in both accompanying and solo chairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
Central Park West, the Brentwood bar and grill where good sounds are on tap Thursday through Sundays, confines its presentations to duos and trios. How much can be accomplished within these limitations was well defined Sunday when pianist Alan Broadbent appeared with alto saxophonist Gary Foster. Clearly this instrumentation could have benefited from the addition of a bass player, yet the two men seemed remarkably self-sufficient.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1986 | A. JAMES LISKA
Why Gary Foster remains a virtual unknown is one of the great mysteries of the jazz world. After a long and distinguished career as an extraordinary alto saxophonist--a superb player graced with unfailing tone, expert technique and impeccable taste--he combines both cool and hot schools of playing into an emotive style all his own.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Emotions have been running high at screenings of the historical drama "Emperor. " The Japanese American coproduction, which opens Friday, revolves around the dilemma Gen. Douglas MacArthur faced as he tried to restore order in post-World War II Japan: Should the country's divine leader, Emperor Hirohito, stand trial and face certain death on war crimes charges? When the producers screened "Emperor" recently in Japan, producer Gary Foster said, many men were in tears as they left the theater.
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