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Gary Foster

ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
You can say this for Pia Zadora: She likes to work in a classy atmosphere. Her concert at the Celebrity Theatre of Anaheim on Sunday night was not exactly at the cutting edge of popular singing, but it did include some of the finest songs in the repertoire of American pop standards, accompanied by 30 or 40 of the best studio musicians in the world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Amazing Panda Adventure" is a lively family entertainment in which two very capable young actors, Ryan Slater and Yi Ding, plus an irresistible panda cub, sustain pretty well some continuity glitches and credibility-straining moments. Its wilderness locations in China's Himalayan mountain highlands are also a real plus. (The film, which opened Friday, was not screened in advance for critics by Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Big jazz bands are a rare breed these days, sustained for the most part by the dedication of musicians willing to work free rehearsals and low-paying gigs. Groups like the Elliott-Ingram Band, which appeared at Catalina Bar & Grill Monday night with saxophonist Gary Foster as guest soloist, illustrate both the promises and the problems of this approach. The ensemble has been in existence for about 2 1/2 years, led by saxophonist Steve Elliott and trumpeter Roger Ingram.
NEWS
June 25, 1993 | BILL HIGGINS
The Scene: Wednesday's benefit premiere of TriStar's "Sleepless in Seattle" at the Cineplex Odeon theater. A sit-down dinner followed in the Century Plaza Hotel's Los Angeles Ballroom. The evening, which netted $2.5 million for the Motion Picture and Television Fund Foundation, was thought to be by far the most financially successful benefit premiere in history. "As far as I know it's the biggest," said honoree Edie Wasserman. "And I've been here since 1939."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1987 | Donald Chase
No. 5, the lovable robot of "Short Circuit," helped push that film to a lovable $100 million in worldwide theatrical and ancillary revenues--surprisingly without merchandising tie-ins to the lovable movie. But the nuts-and-bolts humanoid, laboring in Toronto for producers Lawrence Turman and David Foster and director Kenneth Johnson in "Short Circuit II," appealed most strongly to the under-14 audience. So No. 5 is about to lose its merchandising innocence.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2002 | RICHARD VERRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Die-hard Disney fans say they are being shortchanged by the company's decision Monday to shut down a discount club inspired by the company's founder. The latest dispute between fans and Walt Disney Co.'s corporate managers centers on the Burbank entertainment company's decision to close the Disney Club by next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist Alan Broadbent's trio, with guest saxophonist Gary Foster, gave a performance Wednesday night that recalled the West Coast jazz movement, something most fitting to the occasion: Steamers Cafe's third-anniversary celebration. Jazz clubs such as Steamers are increasingly rare.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Grammy celebration month began a day early Monday with an exhilarating, four-hour, all-star jam session at the Jazz Bakery. Attended by a packed crowd, it was the first of four similar events leading up to Grammy Awards night on Feb. 23. The setup for the evening harked back to one of the most venerable jazz concert formats: a Jazz at the Philharmonic-style presentation in which a single rhythm section backed a series of upfront soloists.
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The new $4-million Beverly Hills Spago would seem the natural lair for the media moguls Ken Auletta has such a deft touch in making talk. What better place for a Rupert Murdoch, Sumner Redstone, Michael Eisner or John Malone to dine?
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