Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGary Lazar
IN THE NEWS

Gary Lazar

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Anaheim Hills couple, owners of 150 Southern California gas stations, were jailed with two associates Thursday on charges of contaminating soil and ground water with gasoline from leaky storage tanks. The district attorney's office said the grand jury indictment unsealed at a hearing represents the first felony case in the United States involving illegal underground storage of hazardous material.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 3, 1997 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Anaheim Hills man, already imprisoned for selling adulterated gasoline and violating California pollution and tax laws, was sentenced Tuesday to 51 months in federal prison for bankruptcy fraud. Gary Lazar, 49, who would have been eligible for parole from a state prison in February, will instead be transferred to a federal penitentiary to serve the additional time, under an order by U.S. District Judge Dickran Tevrizian. Lazar pleaded guilty in December to two counts of fraud for hiding $6.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Anaheim Hills couple who owned and operated more than 200 gas stations in Southern California pleaded no contest Monday to failing to pay $24 million in state taxes, illegally disposing of hazardous waste and selling gas that was so bad it made engines die. Gary Lazar, 46, and his wife, Divine Grace, 40, also refused to do anything when gasoline from leaking tanks contaminated soil and ground water, and conspired to falsify tests, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Anthony G. Patchett.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1995 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Anaheim Hills couple who once ran gas stations throughout Southern California are to be sentenced in Los Angeles today for a series of frauds that damaged thousands of cars with doctored gasoline, threatened ground water with leaking fuel tanks and cheated the state out of millions of dollars in taxes.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1995 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Anaheim Hills couple who once ran gas stations throughout Southern California are to be sentenced in Los Angeles today for a series of frauds that damaged thousands of cars with doctored gasoline, threatened ground water with leaking fuel tanks and cheated the state out of millions of dollars in taxes.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1997 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Anaheim Hills man, already imprisoned for selling adulterated gasoline and violating California pollution and tax laws, was sentenced Tuesday to 51 months in federal prison for bankruptcy fraud. Gary Lazar, 49, who would have been eligible for parole from a state prison in February, will instead be transferred to a federal penitentiary to serve the additional time, under an order by U.S. District Judge Dickran Tevrizian. Lazar pleaded guilty in December to two counts of fraud for hiding $6.
NEWS
September 29, 1993 | From Times wire services
An Anaheim Hills man already indicted on charges of mixing toxic waste with gasoline for sale at his 200 gas stations was arrested again for allegedly failing to pay $23 million in state taxes, prosecutors said Tuesday. Gary Lazar, 45, was taken into custody Monday in Buena Park and held on $20-million bail. He was scheduled to be arraigned Thursday in Los Angeles Municipal Court. Being sought in the investigation is his wife, Divine Grace Lazar, 39.
NEWS
May 21, 1987
The Pico Rivera Redevelopment Agency has agreed to pay $700,000 for the final piece of land it needs to make way for a 224,000-square-foot shopping center on Whittier Boulevard, City Manager Dennis Courtemarche said. Attorneys for the Redevelopment Agency and Gary Lazar, president of California Target Enterprises Inc., are writing an agreement to finalize the sale of the lot at 9006 Whittier Blvd., Courtemarche said.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1990 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed Corp. agreed Thursday to pay a record $1-million fine to settle allegations by air-quality officials that paint-spraying activities at its Los Angeles area plants violated anti-smog rules. The South Coast Air Quality Management District said it was the biggest penalty in the 10-year history of the El Monte-based agency. The fine came seven months after Lockheed paid a record $1.5-million penalty to the U.S.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1997 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Anaheim Hills woman, already imprisoned for selling adulterated gasoline and violating California pollution and tax laws, has been sentenced to 21 months in prison on a separate federal conviction for bankruptcy fraud. Divine Grace Lazar had pleaded guilty last December to two counts of fraud for hiding $6.6 million worth of assets during her and her former husband's personal and corporate bankruptcy cases in 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Anaheim Hills couple who owned and operated more than 200 gas stations in Southern California pleaded no contest Monday to failing to pay $24 million in state taxes, illegally disposing of hazardous waste and selling gas that was so bad it made engines die. Gary Lazar, 46, and his wife, Divine Grace, 40, also refused to do anything when gasoline from leaking tanks contaminated soil and ground water, and conspired to falsify tests, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Anthony G. Patchett.
NEWS
May 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Anaheim Hills couple, owners of 150 Southern California gas stations, were jailed with two associates Thursday on charges of contaminating soil and ground water with gasoline from leaky storage tanks. The district attorney's office said the grand jury indictment unsealed at a hearing represents the first felony case in the United States involving illegal underground storage of hazardous material.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense contractor Ford Aerospace has agreed to pay $250,000 to settle charges that it violated air pollution control regulations at its plants in Newport Beach and Irvine during 1987 and 1988. Ford Aerospace agreed to pay the fine but admitted no wrongdoing after a year of negotiations with the South Coast Air Quality Management District. The penalty is the second largest imposed this year by the regional pollution-control agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1990 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed Corp. agreed Thursday to pay a record $1-million fine to settle allegations by air quality officials that Lockheed's paint-spraying activities at its Los Angeles area plants violated anti-smog rules. The South Coast Air Quality Management District said it was the biggest penalty in the 10-year history of the El Monte-based agency. The fine came seven months after Lockheed paid a record $1.5-million penalty to the U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|