Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGary Morris
IN THE NEWS

Gary Morris

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 29, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TV Times Staff Writer
Country-Western singer and Broadway musical star Gary Morris travels to four European republics, which until recently existed under communist rule, in the four-part "Somebody Lives There." The series premieres Tuesday on cable's The Nashville Network. In Estonia, Hungary, Slovakia and Russia, Morris visits top performers who provide insight into how they and their countrymen struggled to achieve freedom. Morris taped the specials in 1December, 1990, and October, 1991.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Country singer Gary Morris turned 50 just three weeks ago, and his beard is now mostly white, his hair silver. But worry not--judging by his adventurous, freewheeling concert Monday night at the Crazy Horse Steak House in Santa Ana, this Texan is hardly ready to join the oldies circuit. Undoubtedly inspired by the presence on this tour of his 19-year-old son Matthew--who proved himself no slouch as a singer and acoustic guitarist--the elder Morris seems overcome by a restless spirit these days.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1985 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
It's been said that you can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy. Hogwash. Just look at singer Gary Morris, who left the field of country for three months last fall to take a leading role opposite Linda Ronstadt in Joseph Papp's contemporary production of Puccini's opera "La Boheme" in the New York Shakespeare Festival. Now back on the country circuit, this former good ol' boy from Fort Worth, Tex.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1994 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"We're doing this show all over the country, but not like we've done so far here tonight," Gary Morris remarked during his Christmas show at the Crazy Horse Steak House on Monday night. It was, indeed, a most atypical show for Morris. He usually is one of the most in-control performers in country music, with his exactingly directed shows mirroring his remarkable vocal control.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1989 | JIM WASHBURN
Gary Morris is a strange breed of country renegade, bowing to Broadway rather than Bakersfield, having assayed leads in "Les Miserables" and "La Boheme." While other country originals spend their spare time in prisons and detox wards, Morris has inhabited TV soap operas, attaining a hunkdom that fits perfectly with the niche he has carved in country music.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1994 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"We're doing this show all over the country, but not like we've done so far here tonight," Gary Morris remarked during his Christmas show at the Crazy Horse Steak House on Monday night. It was, indeed, a most atypical show for Morris. He usually is one of the most in-control performers in country music, with his exactingly directed shows mirroring his remarkable vocal control.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1988 | HOLLY GLEASON
Gary Morris provides a case in point of how you can take the country out of the boy. During his 65-minute early show at the Crazy Horse in Santa Ana on Monday, Morris crooned tunes and caressed and rocked them. But with the exception of his first encore, "Never Stop Lovin' You," there was nothing much country going on. This isn't to say that Morris may not be, technically, one of the best singers working out of Nashville today.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1991 | JANICE ARKATOV, Janice Arkatov is a free-lance writer.
If Gary Morris had listened to conventional wisdom, he'd probably still be singing at Billy Bob's Saloon in Ft. Worth. Instead, he's opening tonight at the Pantages Theatre, reprising his role as Jean Valjean in the national touring production of the Tony-winning musical "Les Miserables," the Alain Boublil/Claude-Michel Schonberg blockbuster based on the Victor Hugo novel. "I've been an outsider in everything I've done," Morris said in a casual drawl, settling back on his dressing room couch.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is possible that, behind the bare-shouldered-embrace jacket art of a romance paperback, the great American novel waits, overlooked. Stranger troves have been found. Take Gary Morris, for instance. The guy is practically a walking romance novel: His smoldering good looks have been a staple on TV soap operas; women swooned when he took the lead in productions of "Les Miserables" and "La Boheme"; and his attempts at country music detail a gothic landscape where pickup trucks never tread.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1993 | NOEL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though Gary Morris has scored more than a dozen country Top Ten hits, he only sang a couple of them in his first 90-minute show at the Crazy Horse on Monday night. Was the audience disappointed? To the contrary. When Morris pointed to a table and said "I'll take one request," a fan asked for "Sooner or Later," a relatively obscure album track that Morris wasn't even sure he could remember.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1993 | NOEL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though Gary Morris has scored more than a dozen country Top Ten hits, he only sang a couple of them in his first 90-minute show at the Crazy Horse on Monday night. Was the audience disappointed? To the contrary. When Morris pointed to a table and said "I'll take one request," a fan asked for "Sooner or Later," a relatively obscure album track that Morris wasn't even sure he could remember.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1992 | NOEL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gary Morris' unrestrained performance at the Crazy Horse on Monday night made one glad that he is an entertainer and not a cook. Judging by the way he tended to pour his whole cornucopia of vocal flourishes onto practically every song, he would be dangerous with a bottle of hot sauce in his hands.
NEWS
March 29, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TV Times Staff Writer
Country-Western singer and Broadway musical star Gary Morris travels to four European republics, which until recently existed under communist rule, in the four-part "Somebody Lives There." The series premieres Tuesday on cable's The Nashville Network. In Estonia, Hungary, Slovakia and Russia, Morris visits top performers who provide insight into how they and their countrymen struggled to achieve freedom. Morris taped the specials in 1December, 1990, and October, 1991.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is possible that, behind the bare-shouldered-embrace jacket art of a romance paperback, the great American novel waits, overlooked. Stranger troves have been found. Take Gary Morris, for instance. The guy is practically a walking romance novel: His smoldering good looks have been a staple on TV soap operas; women swooned when he took the lead in productions of "Les Miserables" and "La Boheme"; and his attempts at country music detail a gothic landscape where pickup trucks never tread.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1991 | JANICE ARKATOV, Janice Arkatov is a free-lance writer.
If Gary Morris had listened to conventional wisdom, he'd probably still be singing at Billy Bob's Saloon in Ft. Worth. Instead, he's opening tonight at the Pantages Theatre, reprising his role as Jean Valjean in the national touring production of the Tony-winning musical "Les Miserables," the Alain Boublil/Claude-Michel Schonberg blockbuster based on the Victor Hugo novel. "I've been an outsider in everything I've done," Morris said in a casual drawl, settling back on his dressing room couch.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1989 | JIM WASHBURN
Gary Morris is a strange breed of country renegade, bowing to Broadway rather than Bakersfield, having assayed leads in "Les Miserables" and "La Boheme." While other country originals spend their spare time in prisons and detox wards, Morris has inhabited TV soap operas, attaining a hunkdom that fits perfectly with the niche he has carved in country music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1987
Are we being taken advantage of by football team owners? After reading the editorial, it is very clear that the taxpayers' money is practically being taken from under our noses. While hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent in keeping professional sports franchises where they are, it is people like Al Davis, owner of the Raiders, who do not care one way or the other about packing up and moving. We also have to deal with cities such as Irwindale, that offer financing, trying to lure, entice and even hijack our teams away from us. Unless American cities counteract this sports terrorism by either refusing to pay ransom to any team or letting the wealthy team owners build their own stadiums, it is not the sports fan that will win, but the club owners who will have the last laugh at the taxpayers' expense.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1985 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
It's been said that you can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy. Hogwash. Just look at singer Gary Morris, who left the field of country for three months last fall to take a leading role opposite Linda Ronstadt in Joseph Papp's contemporary production of Puccini's opera "La Boheme" in the New York Shakespeare Festival. Now back on the country circuit, this former good ol' boy from Fort Worth, Tex.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1988 | HOLLY GLEASON
Gary Morris provides a case in point of how you can take the country out of the boy. During his 65-minute early show at the Crazy Horse in Santa Ana on Monday, Morris crooned tunes and caressed and rocked them. But with the exception of his first encore, "Never Stop Lovin' You," there was nothing much country going on. This isn't to say that Morris may not be, technically, one of the best singers working out of Nashville today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1987
Are we being taken advantage of by football team owners? After reading the editorial, it is very clear that the taxpayers' money is practically being taken from under our noses. While hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent in keeping professional sports franchises where they are, it is people like Al Davis, owner of the Raiders, who do not care one way or the other about packing up and moving. We also have to deal with cities such as Irwindale, that offer financing, trying to lure, entice and even hijack our teams away from us. Unless American cities counteract this sports terrorism by either refusing to pay ransom to any team or letting the wealthy team owners build their own stadiums, it is not the sports fan that will win, but the club owners who will have the last laugh at the taxpayers' expense.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|