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Gary Toebben

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Kate Linthicum and James Rainey
Union backers of Los Angeles mayoral candidate Wendy Greuel have sent out a new mailer declaring that she would raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour in L.A., even as Greuel and her allies disputed that she had made such a promise and called for all campaign groups to be "truthful. " The campaign mailer, produced by the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, reached voters' mailboxes on Wednesday. On the same day, Greuel and Councilman Jose Huizar specified that she supports a $15 an hour wage specifically for hotel workers, not for every worker in the city.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2011 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas is blasting a campaign mailer sent out by an independent political action committee that listed more than a dozen dead community and religious leaders as endorsing Councilman Bernard C. Parks' reelection campaign. Ridley-Thomas, who ran against Parks for the Board of Supervisors in 2008 and has endorsed his challenger Forescee Hogan-Rowles in Tuesday's council race, said Friday that he was appalled by the literature sent to 8th Council District voters by the Los Angeles Jobs PAC, which is sponsored by the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles International Airport landed in court again Thursday when a labor union, four local governments and a neighborhood coalition filed lawsuits challenging the latest round of construction being performed at the aging facility, including a controversial plan to relocate the northernmost runway closer to homes. The cases allege that Los Angeles World Airports, the operator of LAX, violated state laws that require thorough evaluations of the environmental effects of projects as well as measures to reduce adverse impacts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2010 | By Teresa Watanabe and Hector Becerra
California has long been the ultimate melting pot, with the majority of its population coming from outside the state. Dust Bowl emigres, Asian railroad workers, high-tech entrepreneurs, Mexican laborers and war refugees from around the globe flocked to California. The majority migrant population filled the state's myriad labor needs, challenged the schools with a cacophony of new languages and roiled its politics with immigration debates. But, in a dramatic demographic shift, California's narrative as the nation's quintessential immigrant state is giving way to a new reality.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2014 | By James Barragan, Marc Lifsher and E. Scott Reckard
President Obama named Los Angeles businesswoman Maria Contreras-Sweet, the founder of a community bank and a former California Cabinet member, as his nominee to head the Small Business Administration. Obama said Contreras-Sweet, who has worked with small businesses in the private sector, understands what small businesses need. "Maria knows how hard it is to get started on a business," Obama said Wednesday. "The grueling hours, the stress, the occasional self-doubt. " "So not only did she start small businesses, but those have also been her customers, and she understands all too often that the lack of access to capital means a lack of opportunity," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2013 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles teachers overwhelmingly expressed "no confidence" in L.A. schools Supt. John Deasy in the first vote of its kind in the nation's second-largest school system. In the weeklong referendum that ended Wednesday, 91% of the participating teachers expressed disapproval of Deasy, with about 17,700 of the union's more than 32,000 members casting ballots, the teachers union announced Thursday. The superintendent called the vote "nonsense" even before knowing its outcome, and a group of civic leaders rallied to Deasy's defense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum and David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles business leaders Wednesday pressed elected officials to address ballooning city employee pension costs, pushing for salary freezes as well as a ballot measure that would let voters - instead of lawmakers - decide how much employees should collect in retirement. A brigade of civic leaders that included former Mayor Richard Riordan took their pitch to a closed-door meeting of City Hall's labor negotiations committee, which has spent months mulling a proposal by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to scale back benefits and increase the retirement age for newly hired civilian employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2012 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Washington -- The long-stalled new federal courthouse in downtown Los Angeles will finally move forward, Washington officials announced Thursday, despite scrutiny from congressional Republicans looking for ways to cut the federal budget deficit. The roughly $400-million project at 1st Street and Broadway, planned for more than a decade, would replace the Depression-era federal courthouse on Spring Street, which officials say has security and asbestos problems. It would also fill an immense hole: The Junipero Serra State Office Building, considered seismically weak after the 1994 Northridge earthquake, was demolished in 2007, leaving a gaping cavity and a rainy-season pond occasionally inhabited by ducks.
SPORTS
April 21, 2011 | By David Wharton and Bill Shaikin
Major League Baseball has moved to seize control of the Dodgers, a famed franchise that fans and much of the baseball world had come to see as crippled by an owner who does not appear to have enough money to operate the team. Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig announced Wednesday that he plans to appoint a trustee in the next few days to oversee "all business and day-to-day operations" of the ballclub. The move was prompted by a number of issues surrounding the Dodgers, including owner Frank McCourt's recent receipt of $30-million personal loan to meet payroll and the parking-lot attack at Dodger Stadium on March 31 that left a San Francisco Giants fan in a coma, according to a league source.
OPINION
April 11, 2008
Although a recent spate of violent crime has focused much of the city's attention on gangs, there is another source of fearful social upheaval rippling through Los Angeles: immigration raids. Although they certainly do not threaten residents' welfare and security with deadly gunfire, the continual rounding up of illegal immigrants at their places of employment is having serious consequences within and without the Latino community.
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