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BUSINESS
August 7, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Terry noticed that his gas bill was double what he had paid for the same month last year. He called the gas company and was told that his bill had been estimated because no one actually had looked at his meter. Say what? Terry wants to know what the deal is with estimated utility bills. More videos from Ask Laz It's a growing problem. Utilities nationwide are seeing their customer base grow as the population increases but are cutting back on staff to save money. Their solution: estimated bills.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 7, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Big U.S. banks have learned to play nice, at least when it comes to cybersecurity. Last year, when hackers bombarded, and in some cases hobbled, banks' websites, the FBI met with representatives to discuss the attacks. Bank officials initially were reluctant to share much information, however, according to Joseph Demarest, assistant director in the FBI's cyberdivision. “It was stilted,” Demarest said at a cybersecurity conference in New York on Tuesday. “Folks were rather protective,” he added, and “wouldn't share in an environment with their competitors sitting in the same room.” Months later, Demarest said, the large financial institutions began sharing more information about attacks with the government and each other.
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WORLD
August 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Belarus President Alexander G. Lukashenko said his country would pay a $460-million gas bill to Russia in the next few days. Russia's natural gas monopoly, Gazprom, said Wednesday that it would nearly halve the volume of gas Belarus receives if it did not pay the debt. That sparked fear that Belarus could siphon gas, taking 20% of Russia's exports to Europe.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Terry noticed that his gas bill was double what he had paid for the same month last year. He called the gas company and was told that his bill had been estimated because no one actually had looked at his meter. Say what? Terry wants to know what the deal is with estimated utility bills. More videos from Ask Laz It's a growing problem. Utilities nationwide are seeing their customer base grow as the population increases but are cutting back on staff to save money. Their solution: estimated bills.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
With natural gas costs soaring, the California Public Utilities Commission voted to increase customer bill protections and allow Southern California Gas Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. to expand their natural gas hedging programs. The safeguards included loosening enrollment requirements for the low-income rate-discount program and barring utilities from shutting off service to any residential customer who pays at least 50% of each monthly bill.
NATIONAL
June 7, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Senate leaders withdrew legislation that would have mandated major cuts in U.S. greenhouse gas emissions after falling a dozen votes shy of ending a GOP filibuster. Although the bill enjoyed bipartisan support, the weeklong floor debate devolved into partisan bickering over which party was most responsive to the plight of Americans trying to cope with rising gas prices. The bill would have cut greenhouse gas emissions 18% below 2005 levels by 2020 and nearly 70% by midcentury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1985 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Southland gas bills will take another modest drop this summer as natural gas prices continue to fall. The state Public Utilities Commission authorized Southern California Gas Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric to reduce their gas rates to reflect their lower cost of buying natural gas. As a result, Southern California Gas will trim its rates by $102.2 million, a 2.1% reduction. SDG&E's cut will total $37.4 million, or 6.7%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1988 | JILL STEWART, Times Staff Writer
Four million residential customers of Southern California Gas Co. are being mailed record-high December gas bills--some of them five times the usual cost--because of the combined effects of a recent cold snap and a state law that heavily punishes households for using gas above a so-called "baseline" level, officials said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1988 | JILL STEWART and DOUG BROWN, Times Staff Writers
Four million residential customers of Southern California Gas Co., including 675,000 in Orange County, are receiving record-high December gas bills--some of them five times normal--because of both a recent cold snap and a state law that heavily punishes households for using gas above a so-called "baseline" level, officials said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1985 | S. J. Diamond
"We did everything the gas company says you should," a suburban Los Angeles housewife complains. "We have an air-return duct, keep our thermostat on low, wash only full loads of dishes and clothes. Still, when we got our gas bill in February, it was five times the month before!" Suspicion is the increasingly common reaction. Last January, after an unusual cold spell, 72,000 customers called Southern California Gas Co. with bill complaints--almost twice the previous January's calls.
WORLD
November 22, 2009 | By Jim Tankersley and Henry Chu
Is it a "Warmist Conspiracy," or a case of an e-mail being "taken completely out of context"? Regardless, the latest dust-up over the science of climate change appears unlikely to affect the dynamics of either a pending debate in the Senate or international climate negotiations in Copenhagen next month. Conservative bloggers have seized on a series of e-mails between leading climate scientists, which were obtained by computer hackers and posted online last week, as evidence of a scientific conspiracy to push claims about human-caused global warming.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2009 | Associated Press
Key Democrats reached a deal Tuesday that its supporters hope will lead to House passage of the biggest environmental bill in decades, one aimed at slowing the heating of the planet. Farm-state Democrats won concessions that will delay the Environmental Protection Agency from drafting regulations that could hamper the ethanol industry and will hand the Agriculture Department oversight of potentially lucrative projects to reduce greenhouse gases on farms.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2009 | Associated Press
An "eternal" flame at Bullhead City's new veterans memorial park that only lasted until city officials received a $961 gas bill has been relighted after complaints by veterans groups. The Medal of Honor Memorial at the Arizona Veterans Memorial Park alongside the Colorado River was lighted on Veterans Day in November. When the bill arrived in late December, city officials were stunned. The flame was extinguished Monday but was reignited by midmorning Friday after a meeting of city officials.
NATIONAL
June 7, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Senate leaders withdrew legislation that would have mandated major cuts in U.S. greenhouse gas emissions after falling a dozen votes shy of ending a GOP filibuster. Although the bill enjoyed bipartisan support, the weeklong floor debate devolved into partisan bickering over which party was most responsive to the plight of Americans trying to cope with rising gas prices. The bill would have cut greenhouse gas emissions 18% below 2005 levels by 2020 and nearly 70% by midcentury.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2008 | Leslie Earnest
Serena Jen, a renter for 12 years, is determined to be ready to buy the next time prices are right. The real estate market being in a slump "gives me an added incentive to save more cash for a future down payment," the Los Feliz-area resident says. The problem with saving is the cost of everything. "In January, when I got my gas bill, I couldn't believe my eyes," Jen says. Her bill, usually about $8, was $40. So she wears a coat in the house when it's cold and wraps herself in a blanket to watch television.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2007 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Gil Smith hasn't told his children or his grandchildren yet that he can't give them Christmas presents this year. The longtime Screen Actors Guild member is not sure what to say or even how to say it. "A strike -- I'm not working," says Smith with a sigh, from his rented home in South-Central Los Angeles. "I have no Christmas money. I have enough to try and keep up with the bills, the utilities, the rent and hopefully to buy some food. That's it."
BUSINESS
March 9, 2008 | Leslie Earnest
Serena Jen, a renter for 12 years, is determined to be ready to buy the next time prices are right. The real estate market being in a slump "gives me an added incentive to save more cash for a future down payment," the Los Feliz-area resident says. The problem with saving is the cost of everything. "In January, when I got my gas bill, I couldn't believe my eyes," Jen says. Her bill, usually about $8, was $40. So she wears a coat in the house when it's cold and wraps herself in a blanket to watch television.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1988 | Compiled by researcher Tracy Thomas
Record low temperatures have meant record high gas bills for many Los Angeles residents this winter. The following statistics show gas use and average bills for the period from Dec. 13 to Jan. 13. Gas usage expressed in therms: FOR AVERAGE SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS Winter '87-'88 Gas used: 157 Gas bill: $109 Winter '86-'87 Gas used: 108 Gas bill: $58.
WORLD
August 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Belarus President Alexander G. Lukashenko said his country would pay a $460-million gas bill to Russia in the next few days. Russia's natural gas monopoly, Gazprom, said Wednesday that it would nearly halve the volume of gas Belarus receives if it did not pay the debt. That sparked fear that Belarus could siphon gas, taking 20% of Russia's exports to Europe.
OPINION
September 4, 2006
Re "State on Verge of Greenhouse Gas Restrictions," Aug. 31 In opposing the greenhouse gas bill, Republicans in the state Legislature say the federal government should take the lead. That would be fine, except that they have never called for federal action on climate change and they know that President Bush is in denial about the problem. They're fighting for their business friends over the public interest. California once again leads the nation in environmental protection. BILL COLLINS San Diego Thanks for the Ohio jobs bill.
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