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Gas Guzzling

OPINION
April 9, 2006
Edward M. Hallowell, in his critique of America's "crazybusy" approach to life (Opinion, March 31), suggests that one reason we speed through our lives is avoidance of pain: "Being crazybusy leaves no time to worry about ... global warming, AIDS, the nuclear threat, terrorism and other Big Horrible Problems I Can't Do Anything About." Interestingly, Americans' ceaseless rush is doing something about one of the largest of these problems, global warming. We could reduce fuel costs, accidents, energy imports and the emissions of global-warming carbon dioxide from cars by simply slowing down a little and exercising a light foot when pressing the accelerator.
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OPINION
September 2, 1990
It is probably true President Bush can operate effectively from Kennebunkport. Notwithstanding, once the call up for reserves was made, I found it insensitive, even cruel, for the President to continue his vacation while 50,000 men and women reservists had their lives disrupted by the call. They left their jobs, their families, their homes--yes, even their vacations. Meanwhile, the President, apparently wanting it that way, continued to be seen playing golf, riding around in his gas-guzzling boat and making it clear he wasn't going to become a "captive of the White House."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1991
I was outraged to read in the paper (Feb. 9) that President Bush is not encouraging stiffer standards for gasoline consumption for automobiles, but instead is allowing automobile manufacturers to continue to produce gas-guzzling, smog-producing cars. Living in the Los Angeles area, we are forced to live in a cloud of smog most of the time, which can only be diminished by reducing the sources of pollution, among them the gasoline consumption of cars. We must require the auto manufacturers to produce more fuel efficient and alternative fuel vehicles.
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
A top Bush Administration energy official urged the American public this morning to save one gallon of gasoline a week, saying that effort would be "more than enough" to compensate for the Persian Gulf oil cut off by Iraq. Assistant Energy Secretary Michael Davis said the political crisis in the Middle East has not created an energy crisis.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Maryland lawmakers in Annapolis slapped an extra tax on gas-guzzling cars and gave a tax credit on cars that get good gasoline mileage. It is believed to be the first state in the nation to approve such measures. The legislators also voted to raise the state gasoline tax by a nickel a gallon as part of $120 million in new funding for transportation projects. Gov. William Donald Schaefer later signed the bill.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2004
In "China Barrels Ahead in Oil Market" (Nov. 14), which outlines the enormous pressure that developing countries are going to put on future oil supplies, a short paragraph mentioned that China was launching oil conservation programs, including "imposing fuel economy standards on new cars." China is smarter than we are. While U.S. auto companies continue to push enormous, gas- guzzling sport utility vehicles on a public that doesn't need them, China is taking intelligent steps toward energy efficiency.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2005
Regarding "Governor's 'Vision' Is a Form of Myopia," Golden State, Jan. 10: May I remind Michael Hiltzik that what the government gives it must first take away. That's called a tax. Hiltzik neatly turned around the argument to suggest that not confiscating and redistributing income is a tax. Dan Minkoff Long Beach There is plenty of money out there to finance the state's needs, and more so. It means raising taxes on the most wealthy residents -- not by increasing income tax but by raising the state sales tax on luxury items such as BMWs, gas-guzzling SUVs, yachts and 60-inch flat-screen TVs. Steven Kaplan South Pasadena
BUSINESS
June 11, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
U.S. consumers bought fewer gas-guzzling autos such as Ford Motor Co.'s Explorer sport utility vehicle in the last two months as gasoline prices soared to record highs, spurring demand for more fuel-efficient cars. Sales of cars and trucks with below-average gas mileage fell 0.4% in April and rose less than 1% in May, according to automakers' data. Sales of vehicles with above-average mileage rose 1.4% and 5%. Vehicles rated by the U.S. government average 20.8 miles per gallon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1990 | From Times Wire Services and
As one of the main attractions at the Earth Day rally in Washington, D.C., Sunday, actor Tom Cruise urged the crowd to recycle, conserve and plant trees. But he was decidedly vague when reporters asked him about his hobby--driving gas-guzzling, carbon monoxide-spewing race cars. "The thing is, not many people are going to be able to drive race cars, OK?" Cruise said. "It's important to point to the things you can do to make a difference as opposed to saying, 'Look at Tom Cruise.
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