Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGas Research Institute
IN THE NEWS

Gas Research Institute

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 5, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vehicles powered by natural gas got a big boost Thursday in announcements involving two Detroit auto makers. Ford Motor Co. announced plans to develop an assembly-line version of a natural gas passenger car by 1996 in a $50-million project jointly sponsored by Southern California Gas Co. and the Chicago-based Gas Research Institute. Ford is the first of the Big Three U.S. auto makers to announce a production schedule for natural gas cars.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 5, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vehicles powered by natural gas got a big boost Thursday in announcements involving two Detroit auto makers. Ford Motor Co. announced plans to develop an assembly-line version of a natural gas passenger car by 1996 in a $50-million project jointly sponsored by Southern California Gas Co. and the Chicago-based Gas Research Institute. Ford is the first of the Big Three U.S. auto makers to announce a production schedule for natural gas cars.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
February 26, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp. and a natural gas industry group Monday announced a $39-million project to build light- and medium-duty commercial trucks powered by natural gas. The project, co-sponsored by a gas industry consortium led by the Gas Research Institute, would be part of GM's broader program to explore alternative-fuel vehicles that would meet federal and state clean air requirements.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp. and a natural gas industry group Monday announced a $39-million project to build light- and medium-duty commercial trucks powered by natural gas. The project, co-sponsored by a gas industry consortium led by the Gas Research Institute, would be part of GM's broader program to explore alternative-fuel vehicles that would meet federal and state clean air requirements.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Study Calls Natural Gas Cars Clean as Electric: Though air-polluting emissions at the tailpipe remain more than for electric cars--which have none at all--natural gas vehicles are "comparable" to electric vehicles when the total fuel cycle of each is compared, according to a study by the Gas Research Institute, a trade group. The institute called for amending the California Air Resources Board rules, currently under review, to count air pollution created at all stages of fuel consumption.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cars Using Natural Gas Run Cleaner, Study Says: A study to be released today by the Gas Research Institute concludes that vehicles running on compressed natural gas emit far fewer pollutants than the same vehicles using either regular gasoline or lower-emission reformulated gasolines. The study, prepared for the industry-backed institute by the Southwest Research Institute in Austin, Tex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1992
Senior executives from the U.S. and Japanese natural gas industries met in Century City Tuesday in an annual summit to discuss national energy policies, the role of natural gas in the environment, gas marketing and gas business strategies. The U.S. participants in the third Japan-U.S. Gas Summit included executives of the Southern California Gas Co., the Atlanta Gas Light Co. and the Gas Research Institute. Japanese participants included officials of the Tokyo, Osaka and Toho Gas Companies.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
U.S. consumers can expect mostly stable energy prices in the 1990s, but parts of the Northeast are likely to face a squeeze on electricity supplies early in the decade, an industry research group said Thursday. The Gas Research Institute, sponsored by natural gas pipeline and distribution companies, said the big increase in oil prices that many forecasters have projected for the mid-1990s is unlikely to hit before the turn of the century.
NEWS
July 1, 1986 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
After repeated delays, drilling is to begin today on a 15,000-foot well in Sweden to search for natural gas in an area where conventional wisdom says none should exist. The drilling is designed to test a controversial theory advanced by astronomer Thomas Gold of Cornell University that oil and gas originate deep within the Earth rather than from organic decay, as nearly all geologists believe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John C. Abram, chairman and chief executive officer of Southern California Gas Co. during the turbulent early 1980s, when prices for natural gas were rising and supplies were declining, has died. He was 82. Abram, a staunch opponent of industry deregulation proposed by the Reagan administration, died Sept. 4 at his home in Glendale of undisclosed causes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1988 | MARY ESCH, Associated Press
Under the sunlit arch of a plastic greenhouse, an artificial swamp of cattails and elephant grass sprouts from hydroponic troughs, soaking sustenance from a city's sewage. This could be the waste treatment plant of the future. Picture it: A natural system that uses microbes and marsh plants to transform raw sewage into sparkling clean water. Unlike conventional sewage facilities, which cost a fortune to run, this one makes money. It leaves no nasty sludge. It creates energy.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1985 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
It was one of planet Earth's most violent encounters. About 360 million years ago, a giant meteor slammed into the ground north of here with such force that it apparently shattered the crust of the Earth to a depth of 40 miles--all the way down to the molten core on which the continents float. As it turns out, the violent collision also created a natural laboratory for modern-day scientists to re-examine long-held theories about the origin of oil and gas.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|