Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGasoline Price
IN THE NEWS

Gasoline Price

BUSINESS
August 24, 2004 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
A funny thing happened on the way to $2.50-a-gallon gas this summer. It didn't get there. The average price for regular self-serve gasoline in California has now fallen for nearly three months, to just above $2 a gallon, the Energy Department reported Monday. That comes despite the busy summer driving season and a spurt in crude oil prices to record highs of nearly $50 a barrel.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 29, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California's average gasoline price jumped 6.4 cents closer to the state record in the last week while the U.S. retail average hit a new high because of rising oil costs and supply disruptions, a federal survey showed Monday. Self-serve regular gasoline rose to an average $2.376 a gallon in California, the Energy Information Administration said. The price, up 29.7 cents from a year ago, was only 2.6 cents less than the state's record high average of $2.402 a gallon set Oct. 18. The U.S.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2007 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Gasoline prices took another leap nationwide during the last week, the Energy Department said Monday, with California motorists enjoying a rare period in which retail prices advanced more slowly here than elsewhere. Still, Californians paid the highest prices, averaging $3.228 for a gallon of self-serve regular, up 7.6 cents from the previous Monday and 48.5 cents higher than a year ago. California remains the only state where gasoline averages more than $3 a gallon. The U.S. average rose 9.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2006 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
Average gasoline prices in California inched closer to the celebrated $2-a-gallon mark in the last week, but motorists may not want to get too comfy behind the wheel, as oil prices Monday shot past a less welcome milestone. Crude oil, which accounts for about half the price of gasoline at the pump, rose past $60 a barrel in New York futures trading. That bolstered the stance of analysts who had been predicting that retail fuel prices were poised to rebound.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crude oil and gasoline prices surged on energy markets Tuesday as traders reacted with disappointment to the failure of a U.N. effort to diffuse the Persian Gulf conflict. U.S. markets, which were closed Monday for Labor Day, played catch-up with trading centers in Europe and Asia that saw sharply higher prices after U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar returned from Iraq without an agreement to win the release of Western hostages or the withdrawal of Iraqi troops from occupied Kuwait.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2006 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Refinery problems and higher driver demand in the East drove retail gasoline above $3 a gallon nationally over the last week, the Energy Department said Monday. California motorists still pay about 22 cents a gallon more than their counterparts elsewhere, but they saw a rare mid-driving-season decrease in prices at the pump last week.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
The average U.S. retail price for gasoline rose for the first time in nine weeks, climbing 0.7 cent to $1.498 a gallon as crude oil costs increased, the Energy Department said Monday. On the West Coast, gasoline prices remained the highest in the country, even though they fell slightly from last week.
NEWS
May 18, 2000 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flush with cash and armed with sport-utility vehicles, U.S. motorists are burning through lots more gasoline even though they are paying lots more at the pump, industry and government figures show. Drivers' thirst for fuel was such last year that the growth in demand nationwide was the size of Virginia's entire consumption for 1999 at nearly 10 million gallons a day, industry analyst Trilby Lundberg said.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1997 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California gasoline prices, which have climbed 15% this year in another run-up that confounded whip-lashed consumers, may have turned the corner and should start heading down over the next couple of weeks--barring unforeseen refinery problems, experts say. Over the last two weeks, wholesale prices have decreased by 5 cents and spot prices, a more volatile measure, by more than 15 cents.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|