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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2004 | Nancy Wride, Times Staff Writer
The Thanksgiving tales of Dr. Stephen Severance are not so much heart-warming as stomach churning. With today's launch of peak overeating season, the gastrointestinal specialist at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center said doctors like him will be consumed with treating holiday celebrators who've had one too many drumsticks. Or who laughed while chewing and began choking. Or who somehow inhaled their turkey dinner so fast they got bones lodged in their throats.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2005 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
A gastric bypass surgeon in Riverside has been accused by state medical regulators of mishandling the care of 11 patients, including six who died, casting a harsh spotlight on the possible risks of a burgeoning -- and lucrative -- enterprise embraced by many California hospitals. Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2006 | Beth Gardiner, Associated Press
An American soprano fired by the Royal Opera House because of her weight has been rehired after undergoing stomach surgery and losing 135 pounds, her spokeswoman and the prestigious theater said Sunday. Deborah Voigt, one of the world's top opera singers, lost her part in Richard Strauss' "Ariadne auf Naxos" in 2004 because the Royal Opera House decided a slimmer singer would be better.
SPORTS
November 20, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
He was the biggest man in town. Joe McDonnell always got the scoop, whether it was Pat Riley being fired or Wayne Gretzky being traded, Magic Johnson's comeback or Mike Scioscia's contract, no secret too deep, no detail too obscure. Athletes loved him. Sources trusted him. Fans followed him. Nobody beat him. He was the biggest man in town. Joe McDonnell weighed 740 pounds. That is not a misprint. Visiting players would gasp. Insensitive fans would jeer. Everywhere he lumbered, somebody would stare.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2006 | Patrick Goldstein, Times Staff Writer
WHEN film director Victor Salva first read Dan Millman's classic new-age memoir, "Way of the Peaceful Warrior," he immediately bonded with the book about a troubled young man who is freed from his selfish strivings by the teachings of a grizzled, guru-like gas station attendant named Socrates.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Al Roker went sans underpants in George W. Bush's White House - but it wasn't because he was feeling sexy on the job. Rather, the "Today" show weatherman had accidentally pooped his pants on his way in. He'd included the anecdote in his new book, "Never Goin' Back," released a week ago, and discussed it in an interview with Nancy Snyderman on Sunday's "Dateline. " By Tuesday, however, after the tale of his tail took on a life of its own, he found himself on "Today" discussing it again.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A hospital where a patient died during gastric bypass surgery announced it would resume the weight-loss surgeries after determining doctors had conducted the procedure properly. Robert Messa, 27, died Nov. 18, about a half-hour into a laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery, also known as stomach stapling. The procedure uses staples or stitches to dramatically reduce the stomach's size and bypass part of the small intestine to cause weight loss.
HEALTH
June 9, 2008 | Chandra Shekhar, Special to The Times
Weight loss surgery works, but is so invasive and has such unpleasant long-term side effects that it's recommended for only a fraction of the obese population, and even many in that group are reluctant to undergo the surgery. In hunting for a simpler and safer alternative, researchers have zeroed in on a nerve that carries much of the communication between brain and gut.
SCIENCE
November 25, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
A medical procedure that treats bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract has an unexpected - and, for some patients, quite welcome - side effect: It makes them lose weight. That procedure, called left gastric artery embolization, may just be the next big thing in the fight against obesity. And as a new study demonstrates, it does seem to work. In gastric artery embolization, an interventional radiologist threads a catheter up (or down, depending on his or her entry point) to the left gastric artery and deposits a slew of tiny beads to reduce the flow of blood to the gastric fundus, the upper part of the stomach.
NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
For patients who are obese and have Type 2 diabetes, gastric bypass can be a remarkable cure: After such surgery, more than three-quarters of such patients can significantly reduce or discontinue their diabetes drugs within a year, studies show. With that in mind, diabetes and obesity specialists meeting this week in New York City returned again and again to a central question: how to deliver benefits of bariatric surgery without the risks of major surgery? One proposal: a 2-foot gastrointestinal "sleeve" that can be implanted through the mouth and that lines a small part of the small intestine , just below the stomach.
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