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March 11, 2006 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
Reggie White's death provided the wake-up call, Kirby Puckett's the confirmation. Former USC running back Anthony Davis said last month that because of sleep- and weight-related health problems similar to those of White, a pro football Hall of Famer who died in 2004 at 43, he decided last year to undergo gastric bypass surgery. The procedure is scheduled for today at a hospital in La Jolla and will be shown live on the Internet.
January 8, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Al Roker went sans underpants in George W. Bush's White House - but it wasn't because he was feeling sexy on the job. Rather, the "Today" show weatherman had accidentally pooped his pants on his way in. He'd included the anecdote in his new book, "Never Goin' Back," released a week ago, and discussed it in an interview with Nancy Snyderman on Sunday's "Dateline. " By Tuesday, however, after the tale of his tail took on a life of its own, he found himself on "Today" discussing it again.
August 7, 2005 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
A gastric bypass surgeon in Riverside has been accused by state medical regulators of mishandling the care of 11 patients, including six who died, casting a harsh spotlight on the possible risks of a burgeoning -- and lucrative -- enterprise embraced by many California hospitals. Dr.
July 10, 2006 | Beth Gardiner, Associated Press
An American soprano fired by the Royal Opera House because of her weight has been rehired after undergoing stomach surgery and losing 135 pounds, her spokeswoman and the prestigious theater said Sunday. Deborah Voigt, one of the world's top opera singers, lost her part in Richard Strauss' "Ariadne auf Naxos" in 2004 because the Royal Opera House decided a slimmer singer would be better.
November 20, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
He was the biggest man in town. Joe McDonnell always got the scoop, whether it was Pat Riley being fired or Wayne Gretzky being traded, Magic Johnson's comeback or Mike Scioscia's contract, no secret too deep, no detail too obscure. Athletes loved him. Sources trusted him. Fans followed him. Nobody beat him. He was the biggest man in town. Joe McDonnell weighed 740 pounds. That is not a misprint. Visiting players would gasp. Insensitive fans would jeer. Everywhere he lumbered, somebody would stare.
May 21, 2006 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
One might call it the chicken soup of Korea. For years, Koreans have clung to the notion that kimchi, the pungent fermented cabbage that is synonymous with their culture, has mystical properties that ward off disease. But what was once little more than an old wives' tale has become the subject of serious research, as South Korean scientists put kimchi under their microscopes.
December 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A hospital where a patient died during gastric bypass surgery announced it would resume the weight-loss surgeries after determining doctors had conducted the procedure properly. Robert Messa, 27, died Nov. 18, about a half-hour into a laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery, also known as stomach stapling. The procedure uses staples or stitches to dramatically reduce the stomach's size and bypass part of the small intestine to cause weight loss.
November 18, 2005 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
In the beginning, there was "Survivor" Richard Hatch. Then came "The Apprentice's" Omarosa and "American Idol's" "She Bangs" man William Hung. Now meet Marguerite Perrin, a.k.a. "God Warrior," whose screaming meltdown on Fox TV's "Trading Spouses: Meet Your New Mommy" this month has made her the next instant reality TV star. In fact, Perrin, the swapped wife on the season premiere of "Trading Spouses," is on her way to achieving her own unique brand of reality TV stardom.
November 25, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
A medical procedure that treats bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract has an unexpected - and, for some patients, quite welcome - side effect: It makes them lose weight. That procedure, called left gastric artery embolization, may just be the next big thing in the fight against obesity. And as a new study demonstrates, it does seem to work. In gastric artery embolization, an interventional radiologist threads a catheter up (or down, depending on his or her entry point) to the left gastric artery and deposits a slew of tiny beads to reduce the flow of blood to the gastric fundus, the upper part of the stomach.
September 18, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Bariatric surgery works, if measured in hospital days and medicine costs 20 years after the operation, according to one of the new studies on obesity published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Gastric bypass surgery was shown to help severely obese patients, most of whom after six years had sustained an average weight loss of nearly 28% of their weight. For six years after their surgery, the patients in a Swedish study used more hospital days after bariatric surgery than obese people who didn't have the surgery, but in years 7 to 20 did not. The Swedish study, to be published Wednesday, included 1,010 adults who had surgery and 2,037 who did not. The study looked at long-term healthcare use. Of the surgery patients, 13% had gastric bypass, 19% gastric banding and the rest vertical-banded gastroplasty, a procedure no longer commonly performed.
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