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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2009 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
Take this as a cautionary tale. The man was covered in sweat, clutching his chest, when he entered an emergency room on Thanksgiving some years back. His words are fixed in the memory of Dr. Mark Morocco, associate residency director of emergency medicine at UCLA. "I just ate a lot of meatballs. . . . Oh, my God, here it comes!" he said, then vomited into a sink in the triage area. The diagnosis? More than a dozen of his mother's meatballs, all crammed into his stomach.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2009 | JAMES RAINEY
Poking around Google a few weeks back to see how various television reporters were playing the healthcare debate, I searched for "Candy Crowley." Back came the expected raft of citations: government stories, pieces from Election 2008, a link to Crowley's award-studded bio. There was a mention of her elegant obituary of Ted Kennedy. And this: "Candy Crowley Has Lost A Lot Of Weight." The blogosphere has been awash for months, I discovered, in other incisive speculation about CNN's senior political correspondent: She must have had a face-lift.
HEALTH
October 26, 2009 | Shari Roan
The discovery came about by accident more than a decade ago: Weight-loss surgery often led to dramatic improvements in the control of Type 2 diabetes, often before patients had even left the hospital. Today, evidence of the connection is so solid that some doctors say surgery should be considered as a treatment for diabetes, regardless of a person's weight or desire to lose weight. "We thought diabetes was an incurable, progressive disease," says Dr. Walter J. Pories, a professor of surgery at East Carolina University and a leading researcher on weight-loss surgery.
HEALTH
September 7, 2009 | Shari Roan
An overweight woman who has weight-loss surgery before becoming pregnant may help break the cycle of obesity in her family, according to a new study. Researchers found that children born to women who had weight-loss surgery before pregnancy have improved heart health and a lower risk of obesity compared with their siblings who were born before the mother had surgery. The study was published last week in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Previous research shows a woman's weight and her tendency to develop diabetes and heart disease can influence the long-term health of her fetus, predisposing the child to metabolic problems related to obesity.
HEALTH
September 7, 2009 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
An overweight woman who has weight-loss surgery before becoming pregnant may help break the cycle of obesity in her family, according to a new study. Researchers found that children born to women who had weight-loss surgery before pregnancy have improved heart health and a lower risk of obesity compared with their siblings who were born before the mother had surgery. The study was published last week in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Previous research shows a woman's weight and her tendency to develop diabetes and heart disease can influence the long-term health of her fetus, predisposing the child to metabolic problems related to obesity.
WORLD
September 8, 2008 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
In a land where just staying alive is a challenge, Haider Kareem Said's problem might seem trivial. He's overweight. But that isn't a mere annoyance or something Said can fix with diet and exercise -- he's 5-foot-4 and weighs 495 pounds. So last month, Said had a band surgically strapped around his stomach, an operation relatively new to Iraq that is proving to be a godsend for people facing an unusual consequence of the war: obesity. For most of the last five years, sectarian violence has drastically altered Iraqis' lifestyles.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II and Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writers
Gastric bypass surgery -- a treatment for obesity that is already known to reduce heart disease and diabetes -- decreases the incidence of cancer by 80% over the five years following the procedure, Canadian researchers reported Wednesday. The incidence of two of the most common tumors, breast and colon, was reduced by 85% and 70%, respectively, Dr. Nicolas Christou of McGill University in Montreal said.
NEWS
January 20, 2008 | Judith Graham, Chicago Tribune
Five months before dying of a rare form of stomach cancer, Sandra McNamara uncovered a devastating family legacy. Her illness was closely linked to a genetic mutation. She had it, and that meant her three sisters and their children might have it too. McNamara picked up the phone and started calling relatives in Chicago, Boston and Denver. You need to know: This cancer is hereditary, she said. Get tested. The disclosure threw the family into turmoil as relatives evaluated their choices, including whether to have their stomachs surgically removed as a preventive measure.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2007
Star Jones Reynolds skirted questions about her dramatic weight loss for years, saying only that she had undergone a medical intervention. That intervention, it turns out, was gastric bypass surgery. Reynolds, 45, says she was "intentionally evasive" when people asked how she'd dropped 160 pounds in three years. She writes about her weight loss in a first-person essay in the September issue of Glamour magazine, on newsstands Aug. 7.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2006 | Beth Gardiner, Associated Press
An American soprano fired by the Royal Opera House because of her weight has been rehired after undergoing stomach surgery and losing 135 pounds, her spokeswoman and the prestigious theater said Sunday. Deborah Voigt, one of the world's top opera singers, lost her part in Richard Strauss' "Ariadne auf Naxos" in 2004 because the Royal Opera House decided a slimmer singer would be better.
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