Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGastrointestinal Disorders
IN THE NEWS

Gastrointestinal Disorders

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1990 | MARGIE PATLAK, Patlak is a free-lance writer based in Elkins Park, Pa.
In the early 19th Century, a young Canadian named Alex St. Martin suffered a gunshot wound that left a permanent opening in his stomach. This allowed his physician to make a striking observation--the man's angry feelings slowed the passage of food through his stomach and hampered secretion of various stomach juices which aid digestion. More than 150 years after the case was detailed in a book by the physician, Dr.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
March 24, 2008 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
AT 6 a.m., the hospital's bright hallway lights flicker on, signaling the start of a new day. Doctors in crisp business clothes appear on their early-morning rounds, and the clang of breakfast carts will soon echo through the unit. For registered nurse Liberty Bunag, however, it's finally time to go home and sleep. She began her shift 12 hours ago with an extra-large coffee and since has consumed a liter of caffeinated soda, more coffee and lots of rice, her personal energy food. Sometimes she and the other nurses on the orthopedic ward of White Memorial Medical Center in Los Angeles practice foreign languages to stay alert, squelching the yawns and drowsiness -- the body's way of protesting this nocturnal activity.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
It is the second leading cause of absenteeism from work in this country, trailing only the common cold. It affects 10% to 15% of the population, generating billions in medical bills every year. It traps many of its victims at home in the fear that they will be embarrassed by incontinence in public. Others commute to work in recreational vehicles so they will always have a bathroom handy.
SCIENCE
December 27, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Older people who take heartburn drugs such as Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid and Protonix for long periods have a significantly increased risk of hip fractures, possibly because the drugs block calcium absorption, Pennsylvania researchers reported today. The drugs, which block production of acid in the stomach, are among the most widely used in the United States, with combined annual sales of more than $10 billion.
HEALTH
March 24, 2008 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
AT 6 a.m., the hospital's bright hallway lights flicker on, signaling the start of a new day. Doctors in crisp business clothes appear on their early-morning rounds, and the clang of breakfast carts will soon echo through the unit. For registered nurse Liberty Bunag, however, it's finally time to go home and sleep. She began her shift 12 hours ago with an extra-large coffee and since has consumed a liter of caffeinated soda, more coffee and lots of rice, her personal energy food. Sometimes she and the other nurses on the orthopedic ward of White Memorial Medical Center in Los Angeles practice foreign languages to stay alert, squelching the yawns and drowsiness -- the body's way of protesting this nocturnal activity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2006 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 1,300 inmates at nine California prisons have been stricken with gastroenteritis, according to corrections officials, who remain stumped by the source of the bacterial outbreak. Some inmates have been hospitalized, but most have been treated in their cells for vomiting, fever, headaches, diarrhea and cramping caused by Campylobacter bacteria. A small number of staff members also have become ill.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1996
AMDL Inc., a biomedical company, said the Food and Drug Administration asked the firm to withdraw its application to sell a test for a stomach-irritating bacteria until it provides additional clinical data. AMDL's test, PyloriProbe, is designed to detect the presence of H. pylori, which is associated with ulcers. AMDL said additional studies of PyloriProbe are in progress and that it plans to resubmit its application with the FDA. PyloriProbe is only available for distribution outside the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Long-term use of a widely prescribed heartburn drug called Prilosec may be hazardous if patients are also infected with a common bacterium linked to both stomach ulcers and cancer. Although the drug relieves severe heartburn by suppressing the production of stomach acid, the lower acid levels allow the bacteria to cause more inflammation, a Dutch team reports in the April 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
HEALTH
March 12, 2001 | Timothy Gower
My wife and I are at a large newsstand, one of those places that sells every magazine published on the planet. We drift apart, browsing. I wander over to a certain section, where I spy a publication that piques my interest, though I don't want anyone to see me reading it. I turn my back, leaf through the pages, wide-eyed. I've never seen anything quite like this. Suddenly, I'm startled by my wife's voice. "Honey," she asks, "why are you reading Digestive Health and Nutrition?"
HEALTH
April 19, 2004 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
You get home from work late with a pepperoni pizza in your arms. You sit down, shake some chili pepper flakes onto the pizza and begin to indulge, washing down the pizza with a beer or two. Perhaps you top it off with a cup of coffee. It's late, and so you head to bed. Bad move. You may pay for your late-night indulgence, waking up in the wee hours with heartburn, the hallmark of acid reflux, or what doctors call GERD, gastroesophageal reflux disease. Your biggest mistake?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2006 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 1,300 inmates at nine California prisons have been stricken with gastroenteritis, according to corrections officials, who remain stumped by the source of the bacterial outbreak. Some inmates have been hospitalized, but most have been treated in their cells for vomiting, fever, headaches, diarrhea and cramping caused by Campylobacter bacteria. A small number of staff members also have become ill.
HEALTH
April 19, 2004 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
You get home from work late with a pepperoni pizza in your arms. You sit down, shake some chili pepper flakes onto the pizza and begin to indulge, washing down the pizza with a beer or two. Perhaps you top it off with a cup of coffee. It's late, and so you head to bed. Bad move. You may pay for your late-night indulgence, waking up in the wee hours with heartburn, the hallmark of acid reflux, or what doctors call GERD, gastroesophageal reflux disease. Your biggest mistake?
NATIONAL
August 2, 2003 | From Associated Press
Snacks made with the fake fat olestra no longer will have to bear the unappetizing label that warned they might cause cramps and diarrhea. The Food and Drug Administration lifted the warning Friday, concluding that if the zero-calorie fat substitute has any stomach-troubling effect, it is mild and rare. The FDA approved olestra's sale in 1996, providing packages bore labels spelling out possible gastrointestinal side effects.
HEALTH
March 12, 2001 | Timothy Gower
My wife and I are at a large newsstand, one of those places that sells every magazine published on the planet. We drift apart, browsing. I wander over to a certain section, where I spy a publication that piques my interest, though I don't want anyone to see me reading it. I turn my back, leaf through the pages, wide-eyed. I've never seen anything quite like this. Suddenly, I'm startled by my wife's voice. "Honey," she asks, "why are you reading Digestive Health and Nutrition?"
HEALTH
February 1, 1999 | BARBARA J. CHUCK
Is this your life? * You have to clear your throat frequently. * You have trouble swallowing. * You have a sore throat often. * You have a chronic sour taste in your mouth. If you experience one or more of these symptoms, you might have gastroesophageal reflux disease, or acid reflux. The condition is annoying, yes, but not life-threatening. There are a number of things you can do to ease the symptoms, but understanding the problem comes first.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1996
AMDL Inc., a biomedical company, said the Food and Drug Administration asked the firm to withdraw its application to sell a test for a stomach-irritating bacteria until it provides additional clinical data. AMDL's test, PyloriProbe, is designed to detect the presence of H. pylori, which is associated with ulcers. AMDL said additional studies of PyloriProbe are in progress and that it plans to resubmit its application with the FDA. PyloriProbe is only available for distribution outside the U.S.
SCIENCE
December 27, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Older people who take heartburn drugs such as Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid and Protonix for long periods have a significantly increased risk of hip fractures, possibly because the drugs block calcium absorption, Pennsylvania researchers reported today. The drugs, which block production of acid in the stomach, are among the most widely used in the United States, with combined annual sales of more than $10 billion.
HEALTH
February 1, 1999 | BARBARA J. CHUCK
Is this your life? * You have to clear your throat frequently. * You have trouble swallowing. * You have a sore throat often. * You have a chronic sour taste in your mouth. If you experience one or more of these symptoms, you might have gastroesophageal reflux disease, or acid reflux. The condition is annoying, yes, but not life-threatening. There are a number of things you can do to ease the symptoms, but understanding the problem comes first.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
It is the second leading cause of absenteeism from work in this country, trailing only the common cold. It affects 10% to 15% of the population, generating billions in medical bills every year. It traps many of its victims at home in the fear that they will be embarrassed by incontinence in public. Others commute to work in recreational vehicles so they will always have a bathroom handy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Long-term use of a widely prescribed heartburn drug called Prilosec may be hazardous if patients are also infected with a common bacterium linked to both stomach ulcers and cancer. Although the drug relieves severe heartburn by suppressing the production of stomach acid, the lower acid levels allow the bacteria to cause more inflammation, a Dutch team reports in the April 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|