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Gastrointestinal Disorders

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1990 | MARGIE PATLAK, Patlak is a free-lance writer based in Elkins Park, Pa.
In the early 19th Century, a young Canadian named Alex St. Martin suffered a gunshot wound that left a permanent opening in his stomach. This allowed his physician to make a striking observation--the man's angry feelings slowed the passage of food through his stomach and hampered secretion of various stomach juices which aid digestion. More than 150 years after the case was detailed in a book by the physician, Dr.
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HEALTH
March 24, 2008 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
AT 6 a.m., the hospital's bright hallway lights flicker on, signaling the start of a new day. Doctors in crisp business clothes appear on their early-morning rounds, and the clang of breakfast carts will soon echo through the unit. For registered nurse Liberty Bunag, however, it's finally time to go home and sleep. She began her shift 12 hours ago with an extra-large coffee and since has consumed a liter of caffeinated soda, more coffee and lots of rice, her personal energy food. Sometimes she and the other nurses on the orthopedic ward of White Memorial Medical Center in Los Angeles practice foreign languages to stay alert, squelching the yawns and drowsiness -- the body's way of protesting this nocturnal activity.
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HEALTH
March 24, 2008 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
AT 6 a.m., the hospital's bright hallway lights flicker on, signaling the start of a new day. Doctors in crisp business clothes appear on their early-morning rounds, and the clang of breakfast carts will soon echo through the unit. For registered nurse Liberty Bunag, however, it's finally time to go home and sleep. She began her shift 12 hours ago with an extra-large coffee and since has consumed a liter of caffeinated soda, more coffee and lots of rice, her personal energy food. Sometimes she and the other nurses on the orthopedic ward of White Memorial Medical Center in Los Angeles practice foreign languages to stay alert, squelching the yawns and drowsiness -- the body's way of protesting this nocturnal activity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2006 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 1,300 inmates at nine California prisons have been stricken with gastroenteritis, according to corrections officials, who remain stumped by the source of the bacterial outbreak. Some inmates have been hospitalized, but most have been treated in their cells for vomiting, fever, headaches, diarrhea and cramping caused by Campylobacter bacteria. A small number of staff members also have become ill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2006 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 1,300 inmates at nine California prisons have been stricken with gastroenteritis, according to corrections officials, who remain stumped by the source of the bacterial outbreak. Some inmates have been hospitalized, but most have been treated in their cells for vomiting, fever, headaches, diarrhea and cramping caused by Campylobacter bacteria. A small number of staff members also have become ill.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1996
AMDL Inc., a biomedical company, said the Food and Drug Administration asked the firm to withdraw its application to sell a test for a stomach-irritating bacteria until it provides additional clinical data. AMDL's test, PyloriProbe, is designed to detect the presence of H. pylori, which is associated with ulcers. AMDL said additional studies of PyloriProbe are in progress and that it plans to resubmit its application with the FDA. PyloriProbe is only available for distribution outside the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Long-term use of a widely prescribed heartburn drug called Prilosec may be hazardous if patients are also infected with a common bacterium linked to both stomach ulcers and cancer. Although the drug relieves severe heartburn by suppressing the production of stomach acid, the lower acid levels allow the bacteria to cause more inflammation, a Dutch team reports in the April 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
HEALTH
April 1, 2002 | DIANNE PARTIE LANGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Botox is remarkably safe, especially considering it's a powerful toxin. Occasionally, a mild headache that lasts a few hours may occur after an injection in muscles of the forehead. Very rarely, though, that headache may become excruciating and can last as long as a month.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1998
ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc., moving to offset business setbacks in Eastern Europe, said it's buying global rights to four medicines from Swiss drug giant Roche Holdings for $179 million in cash and stock. Costa Mesa-based ICN is acquiring rights to Dalmodorm, a drug for sleep disorders; Fluoro-Uracil, a treatment for cancer; Librax, for gastrointestinal disorders; and Mogadon, a sleep-disorder drug used to treat epilepsy. The drugs are expected to generate sales of about $67 million a year.
NEWS
January 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
One of every three women worldwide has been beaten, raped or somehow mistreated, according to a sweeping new report that says violence against women should be treated as a global health problem rather than just a law enforcement matter. "I see the health care setting as an opportunity--and right now, it's an opportunity lost," said co-author Lori Heise, who visited at least 20 countries during the last decade, collecting data from 2,000 domestic violence studies.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1996
AMDL Inc., a biomedical company, said the Food and Drug Administration asked the firm to withdraw its application to sell a test for a stomach-irritating bacteria until it provides additional clinical data. AMDL's test, PyloriProbe, is designed to detect the presence of H. pylori, which is associated with ulcers. AMDL said additional studies of PyloriProbe are in progress and that it plans to resubmit its application with the FDA. PyloriProbe is only available for distribution outside the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Long-term use of a widely prescribed heartburn drug called Prilosec may be hazardous if patients are also infected with a common bacterium linked to both stomach ulcers and cancer. Although the drug relieves severe heartburn by suppressing the production of stomach acid, the lower acid levels allow the bacteria to cause more inflammation, a Dutch team reports in the April 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1990 | MARGIE PATLAK, Patlak is a free-lance writer based in Elkins Park, Pa.
In the early 19th Century, a young Canadian named Alex St. Martin suffered a gunshot wound that left a permanent opening in his stomach. This allowed his physician to make a striking observation--the man's angry feelings slowed the passage of food through his stomach and hampered secretion of various stomach juices which aid digestion. More than 150 years after the case was detailed in a book by the physician, Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
It is the second leading cause of absenteeism from work in this country, trailing only the common cold. It affects 10% to 15% of the population, generating billions in medical bills every year. It traps many of its victims at home in the fear that they will be embarrassed by incontinence in public. Others commute to work in recreational vehicles so they will always have a bathroom handy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1987 | HECTOR GUTIERREZ, Times Staff Writer
A sewer line in Kensington ruptured Friday, spilling thousands of gallons of sludge into the San Diego River and causing health officials to cordon off the stream where it flows through Mission Valley and Ocean Beach. The break occurred about 10 a.m. in the 4800 block of Fairmount Avenue, between Montezuma Road and Aldine Drive, and was sending about 50 gallons a minute onto the avenue and into a sewage drain that leads to the river, city and county health officials said.
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