Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGay Marriages
IN THE NEWS

Gay Marriages

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
Here's the latest line of argument put before the Supreme Court against same-sex marriages. Same-sex marriage is bad because gays don't have unplanned pregnancies. I'm not kidding. I wish I were. TIMELINE: Gay marriage chronology My colleague David Savage's weekend story about legal briefs submitted in support of California's Proposition 8 and the Defense of Marriage Act's bans on gay marriage left me incredulous, flummoxed, mystified, gobsmacked -- well, get out your own thesaurus.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 15, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A federal judge in Cincinnati could decide as soon as Tuesday whether to grant a stay on his ruling in a same-sex marriage case involving Ohio recognition of such unions performed in other states. U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Black on Monday ruled that Ohio must recognize same-sex marriages performed in other states but indicated in his decision that he is inclined to issue a stay of that decision while the case is appealed. He gave the parties until Tuesday afternoon to file their motions for a stay and said he would act on the issue quickly.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1996
I am writing to say how much I appreciated Robert Scheer's column on gay marriage, "The Real Threat to Real Men" (Commentary, April 2). If heterosexual marriage is such a sacred and successful institution, then I can't imagine how legal marriages between gay couples could possibly constitute such a dire threat to it. What are they so afraid of? I could as easily complain that heterosexual marriage undermines gay relationships, but that would be absurd, wouldn't it? ATARA STEIN Chino Gays evil.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2014 | By Jenny Deam
DENVER - After the courtroom arguments ended, the hundreds of pages of previously filed legal briefs had been read, and the nervous tears of the three couples at the heart of a Utah same-sex marriage case had dried, it came down to one question: Who gets to define matrimony? On Thursday, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver pondered that question in a closely watched case that weighs a state's right to enforce its own laws against the rights of individuals to marry regardless of gender.
OPINION
August 13, 2010
The question for the last week has been: Which Judge Walker would emerge with the decision on whether same-sex marriages could go forth immediately? Would it be the cautious one who, slapped down by the U.S. Supreme Court over cameras in the courtroom, decided not to allow them during the closing arguments on Proposition 8? Or the one who overturned the ban on same-sex marriage with a historic and elegantly written opinion? The answer was both. Having ruled last week that Proposition 8 was unconstitutionally discriminatory, U.S. District Chief Judge Vaughn R. Walker would have been hard-pressed to decide this week that the resumption of same-sex weddings in California should be delayed until the case wends its way through the appeals process.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2014 | By David Lauter and Tim Phelps, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court on Monday put same-sex marriages on hold in Utah until a federal appeals court can rule on whether the state law banning the practice violates the Constitution. The unsigned, one-paragraph order did not spell out the court's reasoning in the case -- orders that put lower-court decisions on hold frequently do not do so. The order did not indicate any dissents. The decision will block further same-sex marriages in Utah for at least several weeks.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By David Lauter, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
WASHINGTON -- Same-sex marriages will resume in California in a matter of weeks, lawyers who challenged the state's Proposition 8 said. "Let the marriages begin," attorney Ted Boutros declared to a crowd of supporters gathered on the sidewalk outside the Supreme Court after the justices invalidated the state's same-sex marriage ban. Boutros said state Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris will announce the details of the state's plans later Wednesday. The high court's rulings typically take effect within 25 days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SAN FRANCISCO -- In any other setting, the weddings would have qualified as intimate. Each ceremony was nothing more than two spouses-to-be, a black-robed county official and a few witnesses. Sometimes a handful of flowers added a touch of color. But on Sunday, in the middle of a packed room in San Francisco City Hall, each wedding was a small part of a much larger celebration. Outside the building, the sprawling and boisterous gay pride celebration continued. The deep bass of dance music from a nearby party echoed through the room.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court took no action Monday on the gay marriage cases pending on appeal, putting off a decision at least until Friday. The justices have a closed-door conference set for Friday morning, the last such meeting prior to the holiday recess. They have before them 10 appeals concerning gay marriage. One set of cases involves the Defense of Marriage Act and its provision denying federal benefits to legally married gay couples. That law has been challenged by same-sex couples in New England, New York and California and has been struck down by two U.S. appeals courts.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Gay rights advocates in Michigan cheered Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr.'s announcement Friday that the federal government will recognize about 300 same-sex marriages hastily performed March 22. But the small victory translates to more complications for some newlyweds. After a federal judge struck down the state's gay marriage ban March 21, Deborah Dolney, 28, and her fiancee, Jessie-Mae Secord, 33, seized the opportunity to get married. Four counties opened their offices the next day to issue marriage licenses, and Dolney and Secord were among those in line.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
A lesbian couple in Michigan who have lived together for eight years have the right to marry, a federal judge ruled, finding that the state's ban on gay marriage is unconstitutional. In striking down the ban, U.S. District Judge Bernard Friedman became the ninth federal judge to strike down state gay marriage bans in successive cases. Since December, judges in Texas, Utah, Oklahoma and Virginia have found gay marriage bans unconstitutional. "Many Michigan residents have religious convictions whose principles govern the conduct of their daily lives and inform their own viewpoints about marriage," Friedman wrote in his ruling issued late Friday.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
Tennessee has to recognize the same-sex marriages of three couples despite a state constitutional amendment that defines marriage as between a man and woman, a federal judge ruled in a lawsuit Friday. While emphasizing that her preliminary injunction against the state was limited only to the three couples named in the suit, federal Judge Aleta A. Trauger noted that before long, the ban would probably be upended for all same-sex couples in Tennessee. At some point in the future, probably with the aid of further rulings, "in the eyes of the United States Constitution, the plaintiffs' marriages will be placed on equal footing with those of heterosexual couples and ... proscriptions against same-sex marriage will soon become a footnote in the annals of American history," Trauger wrote.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Lawyers will appeal a federal judge's ruling that Kentucky's ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional, but they won't be state Atty. Gen. Jack Conway's lawyers. In a news conference Tuesday that ended with tears streaming down his face, Conway said that defending the state's ban "would be defending discrimination. "  Conway, a Democrat, began choking up when he mentioned his wife and how he had prayed over a tough decision. (Video of his news conference is shown above.) "In the end, this issue is really larger than any single person, and it's about placing people above politics," Conway told reporters.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Joel Silberman, guest blogger, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
In the wake of a federal judge striking down Texas' gay marriage ban and Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer vetoing an anti-gay bill, I feel compelled to confess something uncomfortable: I was totally wrong about gay marriage. I never opposed gay marriage on principle. I have always believed -- and continue to believe -- that a legal contract available to one pair of people should also be available to another pair of people. Because of equality.  But after seeing how the words “gay marriage” fired up conservative voters in 2004, I found myself arguing with friends both gay and straight that it was the wrong issue at the wrong time.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - One day after a federal judge struck down Texas' ban on same-sex marriage, the state on Thursday appealed the ruling. Texas is one of several conservative states, including Oklahoma and Virginia, in which federal judges have struck down bans on same-sex marriage. U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia in San Antonio ruled Wednesday that the ban was unconstitutional. He wrote that it deprived same-sex couples of due process and equal protection of the law, stigmatizing them and treating them differently from other couples.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - Mark Phariss almost didn't file the lawsuit that led a judge to overturn the Texas ban on same-sex marriage this week . One reason: Phariss, a Dallas corporate lawyer seeking to marry his partner of several years, has long been friends with one of the conservative state officials he sued: Texas Atty. Gen. Greg Abbott. The two men grew up about 50 miles apart in conservative country - Phariss in Lawton, Okla., Abbott to the south in Wichita Falls, Texas. Later, they became friends during law school and stayed in touch over the years with an occasional meeting or Christmas card.
OPINION
February 27, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The six state attorneys general who have declined to defend their states' bans on same-sex marriage in court got some encouragement this week from U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. In a speech to the National Assn. of Attorneys General, Holder said that it was sometimes appropriate for attorneys general to abandon their usual obligation to defend the constitutionality of state laws. This page supports same-sex marriage unreservedly. But even so, we worry that Holder's comments will embolden additional state attorneys general - Republicans and Democrats, liberals and conservatives - to pick and choose which of their states' laws they will defend in court.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|