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Gay S Lion Farm

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1996 | MAYRAV SAAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Floyd Humeston, 66, was just a 4-year-old when he started hanging around the bold tamers at Gay's Lion Farm in El Monte. When he could, the boy persuaded trainers to teach him their tricks. Other times, he resigned himself to simply selling peanuts to the weekend crowds who flocked to Gay's and gawked at such motion picture hams as Leo, the MGM lion. The farm is long gone--closed in 1942 and mostly paved over in the '50s to make way for the San Bernardino Freeway. But Humeston, a Whittier resident, returned to El Monte on Thursday for the dedication of a public arts project that pays homage to Gay's.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1996 | MAYRAV SAAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Floyd Humeston, 66, was just a 4-year-old when he started hanging around the bold tamers at Gay's Lion Farm in El Monte. When he could, the boy persuaded trainers to teach him their tricks. Other times, he resigned himself to simply selling peanuts to the weekend crowds who flocked to Gay's and gawked at such motion picture hams as Leo, the MGM lion. The farm is long gone--closed in 1942 and mostly paved over in the '50s to make way for the San Bernardino Freeway. But Humeston, a Whittier resident, returned to El Monte on Thursday for the dedication of a public arts project that pays homage to Gay's.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1992 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
For almost 20 years, until it closed in December, 1942, Gay's Lion Farm in El Monte served as the home for some of the most famous of felines--most notably Leo, MGM's renowned movie lion. On Monday nights, the only night of the week that the lions were not fed, residents in the peaceful countryside near the five-acre site could hear the beasts roar--what the neighbors affectionately referred to as the "Glee Club."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1992 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
For almost 20 years, until it closed in December, 1942, Gay's Lion Farm in El Monte served as the home for some of the most famous of felines--most notably Leo, MGM's renowned movie lion. On Monday nights, the only night of the week that the lions were not fed, residents in the peaceful countryside near the five-acre site could hear the beasts roar--what the neighbors affectionately referred to as the "Glee Club."
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