Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGayle Sayers
IN THE NEWS

Gayle Sayers

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
December 24, 1987 | Jim Murray
Sandy Koufax only won 165 games in his baseball career. Dizzy Dean only won 150. Should they be in the Hall of Fame? Well, let me put it this way: Should the Mona Lisa be in the Louvre? Michelangelo in the Vatican? Could they pitch? Could Shakespeare write? They had careers of such incandescent brilliance, skills of such surpassing superiority, they are ornaments to the Hall of Fame. If they aren't in it, it ain't a Hall of Fame.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
December 24, 1987 | Jim Murray
Sandy Koufax only won 165 games in his baseball career. Dizzy Dean only won 150. Should they be in the Hall of Fame? Well, let me put it this way: Should the Mona Lisa be in the Louvre? Michelangelo in the Vatican? Could they pitch? Could Shakespeare write? They had careers of such incandescent brilliance, skills of such surpassing superiority, they are ornaments to the Hall of Fame. If they aren't in it, it ain't a Hall of Fame.
Advertisement
SPORTS
September 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
CHICAGO -- Devin Hester fielded the punt, and in a flash, the Chicago Bears were in control. He scored on a 73-yard punt in the second quarter and set up a field goal in the third with another long return as the Bears beat the Kansas City Chiefs, 20-10, Sunday. Hester now has seven touchdown returns in his career, one shy of Gayle Sayers' team record. The Bears also got help from Cedric Benson, who carried 24 times for 101 yards, eight shy of his career high.
NEWS
January 3, 1992 | BETH ANN KRIER
HOW MUCH FOR TOMMY LASORDA'S PRE-SLIMFAST JERSEY?: An award-winning TV spot of the '70s showed Mean Joe Greene tossing his jersey to a kid who offered him a Coke. Now there's a store for sports fans who've always wished they could be that boy. That ad aired in an era before game-worn NFL attire--and other gear worn by famous jocks--became high-priced collectors' items. At Super Stars, a shop in Aspen, Colo.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1987 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, Times Television Critic
"Brian's Song"--recalling the friendship of Chicago Bears star Gayle Sayers and his dying teammate Brian Piccolo--was the 1971 prototype for TV's endless triumph-over-affliction stories about sports figures. The sheer number of these stories has tended to diminish and trivialize the genre. Yet none has ever been more affecting--and astounding--than "One More Season," a documentary about Charlie Wedemeyer, a victim of Lou Gehrig's disease (at 9 tonight on KCET Channel 28).
SPORTS
July 26, 1986 | DAVE DISTEL
Ahhhh. What a perfect afternoon for football. High of about 80, cooled occasionally by a gentle breeze from the unseen ocean. A wispy cloud or two. A few hundred fans in shirt sleeves and shorts, some wearing shoes. This is the sunshine time of year for the Chargers, when the offense is unstoppable and the defense is impenetrable. After all, this is July. And this was a scrimmage with the Rams, an exercise simultaneously meaningful and meaningless.
SPORTS
October 7, 1990 | MICHAEL WILBON, WASHINGTON POST
Shake hands with Dan Hampton and it seems each of his gnarled fingers points in a different direction. His ankles have to be taped excessively so they won't buckle. He has had 15 broken bones, more than 300 stitches. And that doesn't count any of the 10 knee operations, five on each leg. There's no cartilage at all in the right one. When he walks, he describes the feeling as roughly akin to miniature ball bearings grinding against one another.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
'Tis the season to be sporty. Hold the tra-la-las, though, for "Quiet Victory: The Charlie Wedemeyer Story" (9 tonight on Channels 2 and 8) is nothing to sing about. It hardly does justice to the incredible saga of a man who went on to football-coaching glory after refusing to be conquered by Lou Gehrig's disease. "It's very, very cliched," Lucy Wedemeyer said recently of the CBS movie about her husband and their life together after he became seriously ill.
SPORTS
September 26, 1993 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks ago, Raider receiver Tim Brown caught nine passes, a single-game high for him. Last week, he caught none. Highs and lows. Ups and downs. So what's new? It has been that way for Brown in the last year, despite his position as the Raiders' premier receiver and a man on the verge of becoming the best punt returner in team history. Brown was up after another strong season in 1992. But he was down about all the off-the-field controversy.
SPORTS
November 2, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY
Walter Payton was amazing throughout most of his 13-year NFL career but never more so than in his first two or three seasons, when he ran behind offensive lineman such as Dennis Lick, Jeff Sevy, Revie Sorey, Dan Neal, Dan Peiffer and Noah "Buddha" Jackson. The backup tight end was the punter, Tom Parsons. Stop me when you see a name other than Buddha that you recognize.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2003 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
It was 1965, and Chicago's WCIU-TV Channel 26 was teetering on the edge of extinction. The independent station couldn't pay its bills. Employees had to plug a nickel into a pay phone to make a call. Because the station had no money for programming, all viewers could watch was a test pattern and, later, a live shot of a bird in a slowly revolving cage. That year, entrepreneur Howard Shapiro assumed control of the fledgling station.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|