Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGeese
IN THE NEWS

Geese

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1996 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The flocks of Canada geese that have become a picturesque feature of San Fernando Valley winters are dwindling, and it's causing quite a flap. The local Audubon Society's count of birds wintering in the Valley has plunged over the last four years from 1,700 in 1992 to 600 last month, said Goose Project founder Rosemarie White.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A flock of more than 125,000 geese is fattening up in a southwest Alaska lagoon in preparation for what federal biologists call one of the most spectacular and least observed bird migrations, expected to begin this weekend. Each year, the world's entire population of Pacific black brant migrates south together from Alaska to Baja California in 2 1/2 days, nonstop. The geese cover 3,400 miles at an average speed of 62 m.p.h. The last time the giant migration was sighted en route was in 1873.
NEWS
December 28, 1995 | JOHN LAIDLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Susan Melcher recalls that there was a time, not too many years ago, that she was moved by the sight of Canada geese. "I used to think they were stunningly beautiful," Melcher said of the graceful, long-necked birds. But that was before scores of geese began taking up residence along a pond next to her law office, fouling her yard and just about every other patch of greenery in the area. Now she has a different view of the geese: "They're rats with webbed feet," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At dawn, when Bob Wood scans Chatsworth Reservoir for Canada geese, he wonders where the wild things are. Wood is on the board of directors of the Canada Goose Project, a group of wildlife enthusiasts who for a dozen years have been tracking the Canada geese that visit the San Fernando Valley. The Valley is the only place in the Greater Los Angeles metropolitan area where the geese regularly stop. The 56-year-old West Hills man is dismayed by this year's numbers.
NEWS
April 10, 2001 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These are the facts in this hiccup of a town on California's far north coast: Most tourists drive through as fast as they can, while Aleutian Canada geese love the place. More and more of the once nearly extinct wildfowl return every year for a leisurely spring visit. Recognizing those facts, the Del Norte County town is trying to turn the Aleutian into the goose that lays the golden egg of ecotourism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1997 | EMILY OTANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michelle Berger spent most of Monday afternoon looking for wounded mallards at TeWinkle Park and consoling Romeo, the big white goose whose feathered companion, Juliette, was in the hospital awaiting surgery. Ever since five of TeWinkle's resident ducks and geese were killed with a pellet gun over the weekend, park regulars have been left feeling that the Arlington Drive sanctuary has been partly ruined. "There are a lot of people who care about the birds," Berger said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1990 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Tom Bradley temporarily cast aside drought considerations Wednesday and, responding to the pleas of conservationists, ordered the use of drinking water to fill a wildlife-refuge pond in the Sepulveda Basin Recreation Area. Plans remain to permanently fill the 11-acre, man-made pond with recycled effluent from a nearby sewage treatment plant, officials at the Encino park said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2003 | Carol Pogash, Special to the Times
She once counted 1,600 Canada geese grazing on her green soccer field. Not only did the population upset the gentle ecosystem of the park, but the geese's slippery droppings, which amount to as much as three pounds a day, can fell even the most nimble of soccer players. Clearly, Central Park's Supervising Park Ranger Judy Felber had to act. Nearly five years ago she hired Luke, a McNab herding dog, and the bird count plummeted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1992 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ain't no feathers flying in this tale. But they might have--were it not for the quick work of Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputies Brian Oblander and Cory Cline. Seems Oblander and Cline were cruising around the Santa Clarita Valley just after midnight Sunday when they happened upon a gaggle of stray geese wandering along Remsen Street at Sierra Highway. As made clear by Sgt.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|