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Gen Michel Aoun

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NEWS
April 25, 1989 | From Reuters
The Iraqi government plans to import $50 million in industrial goods from Lebanon under a trade pact with the government of Gen. Michel Aoun, the Al Ittihad newspaper reported Monday.
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WORLD
December 20, 2006 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
In these days of fear and distrust in Lebanon, there may be no man who inspires more venom than Gen. Michel Aoun. Since returning from 15 years of exile to the joyful cheers of his followers last year, the Christian leader known simply as "the General" has frayed this fragile country's intricate network of allegiances. First he formed a surprising political alliance with Hezbollah. Then he sent his followers into the streets for massive antigovernment demonstrations.
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NEWS
June 29, 1989
Christian and Muslim leaders in Lebanon supported an Arab League call for a truce, but Syrian and Lebanese Christian gunners continued to trade shellfire that killed two people. Police said 11 people were wounded by the rocket and artillery shells that exploded on both sides of the Green Line dividing Beirut into Christian and Muslim sectors. Fighting began March 8 between Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun's mainly Christian Lebanese army and Syrian soldiers allied with Lebanese Druze militiamen.
WORLD
June 13, 2005 | Rania Abouzeid and Megan K. Stack, Special to The Times
Shoving aside their hastily forged anti-Syrian alliance, a pair of iconic civil war veterans did bitter battle at the ballot box Sunday in the most keenly contested round of Lebanon's parliamentary elections. The outspoken, perennially divisive Gen. Michel Aoun, fresh from nearly 15 years in exile in France, squared off against Druze leader Walid Jumblatt. The two had joined forces this year to end nearly three decades of Syrian domination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1991
Your editorial "Bit of Hope for an Exhausted Nation" (May 4) was full of misconceptions and misunderstanding. Contrary to your claims, the Hrawi government does not represent the Lebanese. It was not chosen by the people of Lebanon but was imposed by outside manipulations, tricks, bribes and Syrian troops. The Hrawi regime is a puppet government to Syria, a dictatorship. Very few people in Lebanon expect this lackey government to restore peace, especially when we know that the armed presence of Hezbollah, the Iranian Revolutionary Guard and the Palestinians will be strongly maintained.
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | ALI JABER, DEUTSCHE PRESSE-AGENTUR
When Kamal Abu-Haidar, 30, had a flat tire on his way home on a main highway in central Lebanon one Saturday evening, he waited seven hours before a lone car pulled over and its driver loaned him a jack. One month earlier, the bustling road into Lebanon's mountain resorts east of Beirut was constantly jammed with vehicles carrying people until the morning's first light. Abu-Haidar's saviors were a group of Syrian soldiers on patrol in the newly conquered Christian area of Lebanon, which Gen.
WORLD
December 20, 2006 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
In these days of fear and distrust in Lebanon, there may be no man who inspires more venom than Gen. Michel Aoun. Since returning from 15 years of exile to the joyful cheers of his followers last year, the Christian leader known simply as "the General" has frayed this fragile country's intricate network of allegiances. First he formed a surprising political alliance with Hezbollah. Then he sent his followers into the streets for massive antigovernment demonstrations.
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Nearly 70,000 young Christian followers of Gen. Michel Aoun today burned tires and demonstrated in Lebanon's Christian enclave against Parliament's peace plan that shifts political power to the Muslim majority. However, the right-wing Falange Party, the main Christian political organization in Lebanon, declared support for the peace plan worked out by Lebanese legislators during three weeks of discussions in Taif, Saudi Arabia.
WORLD
June 13, 2005 | Rania Abouzeid and Megan K. Stack, Special to The Times
Shoving aside their hastily forged anti-Syrian alliance, a pair of iconic civil war veterans did bitter battle at the ballot box Sunday in the most keenly contested round of Lebanon's parliamentary elections. The outspoken, perennially divisive Gen. Michel Aoun, fresh from nearly 15 years in exile in France, squared off against Druze leader Walid Jumblatt. The two had joined forces this year to end nearly three decades of Syrian domination.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lebanon's warring Christian leaders agreed to a peace accord after nine days of bloody fighting that killed more than 350 people. Christian mediators announced that Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun and Lebanese Forces militia chief Samir Geagea had agreed to enforce a two-day-old cease-fire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1991
Your editorial "Bit of Hope for an Exhausted Nation" (May 4) was full of misconceptions and misunderstanding. Contrary to your claims, the Hrawi government does not represent the Lebanese. It was not chosen by the people of Lebanon but was imposed by outside manipulations, tricks, bribes and Syrian troops. The Hrawi regime is a puppet government to Syria, a dictatorship. Very few people in Lebanon expect this lackey government to restore peace, especially when we know that the armed presence of Hezbollah, the Iranian Revolutionary Guard and the Palestinians will be strongly maintained.
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | ALI JABER, DEUTSCHE PRESSE-AGENTUR
When Kamal Abu-Haidar, 30, had a flat tire on his way home on a main highway in central Lebanon one Saturday evening, he waited seven hours before a lone car pulled over and its driver loaned him a jack. One month earlier, the bustling road into Lebanon's mountain resorts east of Beirut was constantly jammed with vehicles carrying people until the morning's first light. Abu-Haidar's saviors were a group of Syrian soldiers on patrol in the newly conquered Christian area of Lebanon, which Gen.
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Nearly 70,000 young Christian followers of Gen. Michel Aoun today burned tires and demonstrated in Lebanon's Christian enclave against Parliament's peace plan that shifts political power to the Muslim majority. However, the right-wing Falange Party, the main Christian political organization in Lebanon, declared support for the peace plan worked out by Lebanese legislators during three weeks of discussions in Taif, Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
June 29, 1989
Christian and Muslim leaders in Lebanon supported an Arab League call for a truce, but Syrian and Lebanese Christian gunners continued to trade shellfire that killed two people. Police said 11 people were wounded by the rocket and artillery shells that exploded on both sides of the Green Line dividing Beirut into Christian and Muslim sectors. Fighting began March 8 between Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun's mainly Christian Lebanese army and Syrian soldiers allied with Lebanese Druze militiamen.
NEWS
April 25, 1989 | From Reuters
The Iraqi government plans to import $50 million in industrial goods from Lebanon under a trade pact with the government of Gen. Michel Aoun, the Al Ittihad newspaper reported Monday.
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