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Gen Norman Schwarzkopf

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1996
What this country needs right now, more than ever, is a great leader who knows how to get the job done. I nominate Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf. WILLIAM S. KOESTER Upland
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, who presided over the swift and devastating 1991 military assault on Iraq that transformed the Middle East and reminded America what it was like to win a war, died Thursday of complications from pneumonia. He was 78. The former four-star general, whose burly image towering in camouflage fatigues above his troops came to define both Operation Desert Storm and the nation's renewed sense of military pride, had been living in relatively quiet retirement in Tampa, Fla., eschewing the political battles that continued to broil over a part of the world he had left as a conqueror.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1992
We remember that at the end of the Gulf War and Desert Storm there was considerable enthusiasm, including that of Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, to finish the job then and to destroy Saddam Hussein and his bailiwick. But Bush and his advisers said no, we will not finish it! We can see now that the reason for not finishing the war then was so that Bush could start the war again just before election. He would then become a hero and the election could be his! ALLEN HASTINGS, Whittier
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1996
What this country needs right now, more than ever, is a great leader who knows how to get the job done. I nominate Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf. WILLIAM S. KOESTER Upland
OPINION
June 2, 1991
In honor of those who served in the 100-hour ground war in the Persian Gulf, I suggest that the U.S. Treasury Department print limited editions of commemorative $100 bills. Ten million of each could feature President Bush, Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney, (Joint Chiefs of Staff) Gen. Colin Powell and (allied commander) Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf. The design on the reverse side of the bills could include a ship, a jet plane, a tank and a Patriot missile. The 40 million bills would likely be snapped up by collectors and thus generate $4 billion for the U.S. government.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1991
Regarding Rick Du Brow's article "Television Surrenders to the Charms of Stormin' Norman" (March 23): It's sad that the uninformed public is hailing Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf as some kind of hero. For what? Murdering 112,000 civilians, 70,000 of them children (Red Cross figures, widely reported in Europe), and slaughtering a retreating, mismatched army? Would Mike Tyson be a hero for knocking out a Cub Scout? It really says something about the guilt and inferiority our country must be feeling.
NEWS
April 7, 1991
The comment by Gen. William Westmoreland about Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf's briefing shows how out of touch Westmoreland is now and probably was during the Vietnam War. The quote is, "It was just a standard military briefing. I was surprised that America was so enthralled." ("General Principles," March 25). I have seen many presentations by smooth professionals using fancier visual aids. Gen. Schwarzkopf's presentation was the very best of them all. It grabbed my attention from its start by presenting information in a succinct and orderly way, unifying confusing material into a coherent whole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, who presided over the swift and devastating 1991 military assault on Iraq that transformed the Middle East and reminded America what it was like to win a war, died Thursday of complications from pneumonia. He was 78. The former four-star general, whose burly image towering in camouflage fatigues above his troops came to define both Operation Desert Storm and the nation's renewed sense of military pride, had been living in relatively quiet retirement in Tampa, Fla., eschewing the political battles that continued to broil over a part of the world he had left as a conqueror.
NEWS
September 28, 1992 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After slipping into semi-seclusion for more than a year, an American hero returns to center stage today to wage one of the toughest battles of his life: Justifying the $6 million Bantam Books paid for his autobiography. The 530-page chronicle, "It Doesn't Take a Hero"--with a blockbuster first printing of 700,000 copies--already is in bookstores. And for the next two weeks, on a promotional tour that will take him across the United States and to England, H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1991
Let's run the race on a level playing field by having Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf as the contender. MANUEL B. CAGULADA Reseda
NEWS
September 28, 1992 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After slipping into semi-seclusion for more than a year, an American hero returns to center stage today to wage one of the toughest battles of his life: Justifying the $6 million Bantam Books paid for his autobiography. The 530-page chronicle, "It Doesn't Take a Hero"--with a blockbuster first printing of 700,000 copies--already is in bookstores. And for the next two weeks, on a promotional tour that will take him across the United States and to England, H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1992
We remember that at the end of the Gulf War and Desert Storm there was considerable enthusiasm, including that of Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, to finish the job then and to destroy Saddam Hussein and his bailiwick. But Bush and his advisers said no, we will not finish it! We can see now that the reason for not finishing the war then was so that Bush could start the war again just before election. He would then become a hero and the election could be his! ALLEN HASTINGS, Whittier
OPINION
June 2, 1991
In honor of those who served in the 100-hour ground war in the Persian Gulf, I suggest that the U.S. Treasury Department print limited editions of commemorative $100 bills. Ten million of each could feature President Bush, Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney, (Joint Chiefs of Staff) Gen. Colin Powell and (allied commander) Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf. The design on the reverse side of the bills could include a ship, a jet plane, a tank and a Patriot missile. The 40 million bills would likely be snapped up by collectors and thus generate $4 billion for the U.S. government.
NEWS
April 7, 1991
The comment by Gen. William Westmoreland about Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf's briefing shows how out of touch Westmoreland is now and probably was during the Vietnam War. The quote is, "It was just a standard military briefing. I was surprised that America was so enthralled." ("General Principles," March 25). I have seen many presentations by smooth professionals using fancier visual aids. Gen. Schwarzkopf's presentation was the very best of them all. It grabbed my attention from its start by presenting information in a succinct and orderly way, unifying confusing material into a coherent whole.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1991
Regarding Rick Du Brow's article "Television Surrenders to the Charms of Stormin' Norman" (March 23): It's sad that the uninformed public is hailing Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf as some kind of hero. For what? Murdering 112,000 civilians, 70,000 of them children (Red Cross figures, widely reported in Europe), and slaughtering a retreating, mismatched army? Would Mike Tyson be a hero for knocking out a Cub Scout? It really says something about the guilt and inferiority our country must be feeling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1991
A "new world order" is possible when a competent, no-nonsense and energetic leader named Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf gets elected as President in 1992. MANUEL B. CAGULADA, Reseda
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