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OPINION
September 6, 2012
Re "Lego's 'Ladyfig' toys have critics, and plenty of buyers," Business, Sept. 1 I'm not a fan of gender stereotyping (or any stereotyping), but anything that gets girls building and strengthening their visual and spatial skills is a good thing. Besides, no one has been upset by Lego's gender stereotyping aimed at boys (Star Wars, DC Superheros, monster fighters, cars, factories and more). Amanda Brooks Lompoc ALSO: Letters: GOP propaganda? Letters: Trees or a space shuttle?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Capitol, home to inspiring statues of Andrew Jackson, Sam Houston, Ronald Reagan. And Lucille Ball? A group seeking to increase the number of women represented in the Capitol's collection of statues includes the red-headed comedian on a list of California women who should be considered for Washington's version of a national hall of fame. Since 1864, each state has been authorized to place statues of two of its distinguished deceased citizens in the Capitol.
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OPINION
March 4, 2014
Re "You can lead a girl to Legos…," Opinion, Feb. 28 My son, now 25, was a certified Lego-maniac as a child. He amassed a huge collection of the little bricks and built cities, and especially cars, with them. After he grew up and moved away, he made it clear he didn't want me to sell them. However, he is more than happy to let his cousin, a 7-year-old girl, play with them. Now she builds cities, and especially cars. Oh, and she takes ballet lessons too, and she loves to dress up on Oscar night.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
"In the Blood" casts mixed martial artist Gina Carano as Ava, who has overcome a particularly parlous upbringing to turn her life around and marry up the social ladder. While on their Dominican honeymoon, husband Derek (Cam Gigandet) vanishes, apparently in an elaborate abduction plot. When local police offer no help, Ava takes matters into her own hands. The self-defense chops she learned the hard way come in very handy, of course. Though lacking marquee names, the film measures up to the typical Hollywood action-thriller in just about every other bailiwick.
OPINION
December 3, 2013
Re "In S. Africa, shock and outrage at rape crisis," Nov. 29 Again we will ask ourselves, "Why do men rape?" This is an important question, but it is not enough to ask it. We must also ask, "Why do men not rape?" Here, I refer not so much to individuals as cultures. There are societies in which rape does not exist or rarely occurs. The anthropologist Peggy Reeves Sanday speaks of "rape free" societies. In these cultures women have a structurally central role with economic responsibility and power.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990
In the Aug. 3 article, "Meryl Streep Attacks Hollywood Gender Gap at SAG Conference," the actress lashed out at the film industry for downplaying the importance of women on the screen and blamed Hollywood for the big-budget male films. Also, the story reported that the combined income of men doubled that of women. I can give Streep a good reason for all this: There isn't one female star with the drawing power of Hoffman, Gibson, Nicholson, Cruise, Willis, Schwarzenegger, Redford, Newman, Allen, Costner, De Niro, Stallone, etc., etc., etc. BILL STEIN Cambria
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Rosie Mestel
Why are women more prone to autoimmune diseases like lupus, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis? A new study in mice points to a possible contributor: different types of bacteria that populate our guts. It goes like this: Different mixes of bacteria reside in the innards of male and female mice. Those bacteria, in turn, affect the chemistry of the animals' bodies -- and, it appears, their risk of autoimmunity. The study, just published in Science , was done by Janet Markle of the Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, Toronto, and colleagues. It's a little complicated, with players that include sex hormones, fatty chemicals, immune cells and a whole host of microscopic life forms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The Los Angeles Zoo is trying to raise the population of female Komodo dragons, a giant and endangered lizard, by using a DNA test originally devised to identify the gender of bird eggs. Swelling the female ranks would help close a gender gap in captive dragons in North America, which is home to 71 males, 46 females and six of the giant lizards whose sex remains unknown. It would also move the species closer to a self-sustaining and genetically diverse population, which scientists believe they would reach with 75 males and 75 females.
WORLD
August 21, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
Caster Semenya started to run almost as soon as she could walk. She played soccer with the boys in her rural village. At school races, she'd lap the other girls -- sometimes twice or more. Even then, according to friends quoted by South African news reports, girls teased her about looking like a boy. Semenya shrugged it off and kept on running. But after she exploded onto the athletic stage Wednesday in the World Championships in Berlin, beating her nearest rival in the women's 800-meter race by a whopping 2.45 seconds, the question was back: Is she really a she?
WORLD
November 6, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
From the land that gave the cinema world Greta Garbo and Ingrid Bergman comes a plan for pressuring filmmakers to correct decades of gender stereotyping and sexism. Four independent Swedish cinemas, in collaboration with the state-funded Swedish Film Institute, have begun rating the films they show on whether they pass the "Bechdel Test. " The sexism ratings exam is named for American cartoonist Alison Bechdel, who introduced it in her comic strip “Dykes to Watch Out For” in 1985.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Susan Rohwer, guest blogger
When children don't conform to stereotypical gender assumptions, is it ever appropriate to punish them? This month, 9-year-old Grayson Bruce of North Carolina was told to leave his My Little Pony backpack at home because it was a “trigger for bullying.” To which his mother said: “Saying a lunchbox is a trigger for bullying is like saying a short skirt is a trigger for rape. It's flawed logic.” And last month, 8-year-old Sunnie Kahle in Virginia was told to stop dressing like a boy or she would not be able stay at her Christian school.
SPORTS
March 9, 2014 | By Gary Klein
More than 25,000 participants are expected to compete Sunday in the 29th annual L.A. Marathon. Defending men's champion Erick Mose of Kenya is among 16 competitors in the elite men's field. Ethiopia's Amane Gobena, who finished second in 2009, is among 10 elite women's competitors. Winners of the men's and women's races each receive $25,000. A $50,000 "challenge" bonus also will be awarded to the first runner to cross the finish line. The women will start 17 minutes 41 seconds ahead of the men, nearly a minute less than the 18:35 advantage of last year, when Belarus' Aleksandra Duliba finished 2:09 ahead of Mose.
SPORTS
March 9, 2014 | By Gary Klein
Amane Gobena glanced over her shoulder several times as she approached the final stretch of Sunday's L.A. Marathon. Gobena, of Ethiopia, wanted to make sure that no one could threaten her shot at a $75,000 payday. She had no need to worry. Gobena won the women's race in 2 hours 27 minutes 37 seconds to earn $25,000. Countryman Gebo Burka won the men's race in 2:10:37, but his time was not fast enough to overcome the 17-minute 41-second head start afforded the women as part of the event's $50,000 gender challenge.
SPORTS
March 9, 2014 | By Gary Klein
Amane Gobena of Ethiopia won the women's race and Gebo Burka of Ethiopia won the men's race in the 29th Asics L.A. Marathon. Gobena, 31, won in 2 hours 27 minutes 37 seconds, collecting $25,000 for the victory. Burka, 26, clocked a 2:10:37 to win a marathon for the first time. He also won $25,000. Gobena won $50,000 for winning the gender "challenge. " The women were given a 17:41 head start and Gobena finished 41 seconds ahead of Burka. Joshua George won the men's wheelchair race in 1:33:11.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014 | Robin Abcarian, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
NATIONAL HARBOR, Md.--I took the Al Cardenas Challenge … and won! Cardenas, an attorney and former head of the Florida GOP. is the chairman of the American Conservative Union, which sponsors CPAC. On Friday, he was asked why women were so badly underrepresented as speakers at the annual Republican gathering, which has featured on its main stage a parade of high-profile men and relatively few women. “A vast majority of the featured speakers have been men,” a reporter told Cardenas at an impromptu news conference just outside the main ballroom.
OPINION
March 4, 2014
Re "You can lead a girl to Legos…," Opinion, Feb. 28 My son, now 25, was a certified Lego-maniac as a child. He amassed a huge collection of the little bricks and built cities, and especially cars, with them. After he grew up and moved away, he made it clear he didn't want me to sell them. However, he is more than happy to let his cousin, a 7-year-old girl, play with them. Now she builds cities, and especially cars. Oh, and she takes ballet lessons too, and she loves to dress up on Oscar night.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
Cinema trends ebb and flow, but one facet of Hollywood moviemaking proving remarkably consistent is gender inequality, according to a study being released Monday by USC's Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism. In a survey of the top 100-grossing movies of 2009 — including "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen," "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" and "The Twilight Saga: New Moon" — researchers found that 32.8% of the 4,342 speaking characters were female and 67.2% were male, a percentage identical to that of the top-grossing movies of 2008.
OPINION
April 16, 2004
Regarding Crispin Sartwell's "The Genocidal Killer in the Mirror," Commentary, April 11: I could not agree more. I was wondering when somebody would point out this obvious truth. But let's get the genders right. It is only true if the face in the mirror is male. Maxine Del Gallo El Monte
OPINION
February 28, 2014 | By Charlotte Allen
There's a war against Legos. I know what you're thinking: How could anyone have a beef with those colorful, plastic toy bricks with which you can build cities, stage your own Bible stories or reenact the Trojan War, the Civil War or Star Wars? And hasn't "The Lego Movie" been No. 1 at the box office for three straight weeks? But here's Lego's problem: The main market for the $4 billion company's traditional plastic bricks and mini-figures is boys. Certainly some girls enjoy making castles or skyscrapers out of the bricks, just like their brothers, but in 2011, Lego's market research boys found that 90% of Lego users were boys.
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
Most women working today will not live to see the day that women reach parity with men in leadership roles in business, politics and more. That won't happen for 71 years, according to a new report. The Women's Media Center report, released this week, on the status of women in media takes a close look at women's present role in news, television, tech, entrepreneurship and social media, and their findings are bleak. The report sums it up: “Progress is slow.” So slow that women won't have equal footing with men in leadership roles in politics, business, entrepreneurship and nonprofits until 2085, according to the report.
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