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OPINION
January 3, 1988
I wonder if your article ("Scientists Find Gene that Determines Embryo's Sex," Dec. 23) describing the discovery of a gene in the Y chromosome that is part of the inborn genetic code of men (but not of women) will signify a growth in the popularity of the name Gene for new-born male babies? KENNETH LLOYD LARSON Los Angeles
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SCIENCE
March 13, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
If you're a student of fat - and who isn't these days? - you know that the FTO gene is the gene thought to be most responsible for some people's inherited propensity to become obese. Well, forget that. A multinational group of geneticists has discovered that, more likely, the real obesity gene is named IRX3, and it is very far from the FTO gene - or would be, if DNA were to be stretched out in linear fashion instead of coiled up like a skein of yarn. In a letter posted Wednesday to the website of the journal Nature, University of Chicago geneticists Scott Smemo and Marcelo A. Nobrega, along with a team of Canadian and Spanish researchers, wrote that geneticists hunting for the obesity gene appear to have fallen into a trap: They assumed that genetic variations they could see have only local effects, and do not affect the workings of far-away genes.
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SCIENCE
July 15, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
People living at some of the world's highest elevations seem to have evolved to cope with the thinner air, according to a new study. A team led by Rasmus Nielsen and Emilia Huerta-Sanchez of UC Berkeley have pinpointed a gene, BHLHE41, that appears responsible for high-altitude Ethiopians' ability to adapt to low-oxygen environments. Anyone who has climbed Half Dome or played baseball in Colorado knows that high elevation causes shortness of breath and other symptoms of “hypobaric hypoxia,” due to low pressure and oxygen.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
The gig: Deryl McKissack, 52, is president and chief executive of McKissack & McKissack, a construction management and design firm with offices in Los Angeles, Washington, Chicago and Baltimore. The firm manages about $15 billion in construction projects. It has 160 employees. "We're managing the construction process, providing inspections, overseeing schedules and budgets," McKissack said. "With program management, you are managing more than just one project. You are managing an entire capital program for a client.
SCIENCE
July 25, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
If you've spent any time in the dirt, you might have seen firsthand that earthworms and snails squirm through life just fine after losing their heads - they simply grow a new one. What is their secret for regenerating? One of the keys is to block a specific gene that makes head growth a one-time thing. Scientists discovered this in a series of experiments published Wednesday by the journal Nature. The trick worked so well that scientists surprised themselves by growing worms with heads on both ends.
NEWS
December 23, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Geneticists have discovered a gene that determines the sex of a human embryo, a finding that offers an unprecedented window into the earliest stages of development. The gene appears to start a complex chain reaction of hormones that eventually leads to the development of a male. Without the gene, the embryo begins a different pathway and grows into a female. The gene is located on the Y chromosome, which is part of the inborn genetic code of men but not women.
NEWS
February 24, 1995 | RIP RENSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Call them "Less Than Satisfying Encounters With Humanity," or LTSEWH, for short. I swear they're true. Only the names have been omitted to protect the imbecilic. * LTSEWH 1: I don't find a lot of peace in each day, but a morning cup of coffee at a local Starbucks doesn't disagree with me. I gnaw on a low-fat six-grain scone and read what I can stomach of the paper.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1997 | JOSEPH GELMIS, NEWSDAY
Computerdom's most sophisticated artificial life form is the Norn, a cute, bug-eyed virtual pet with floppy ears and a Mickey Mouse-like falsetto voice, currently being bred and nurtured--and traded, via the Web and e-mail--by 150,000 users in Europe and Australia. The Norn's home is a CD-ROM called "Creatures," developed by CyberLife Technology Ltd. of Cambridge, England.
SCIENCE
December 30, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Ready yourself for the real-life glowing green menagerie. Ten little piggies that glow in the dark have been created by scientists at the South China Agricultural University. (See the video above.) A sheep that glows green under a black light will soon be announced by researchers in Turkey, and that same Turkish team has already created  glow-in-the-dark bunnies .  By the light of day these animals all look normal. But turn off the lights and hit them with a black light and parts of their bodies glow fluorescent green.
SCIENCE
July 15, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
If you have a little kid, you know the drill. Your child develops a nasty fever, but no one's really sure what's making him sick. Most likely, he has a virus that will run its course. He may have a scary bacterial infection that requires treatment, but results of tests to confirm this won't come back for a day or so.  So to be safe, your pediatrician prescribes antibiotics -- even though they won't help fight a virus and even though overuse of antibiotic drugs has led to the evolution of drug-resistant superbugs.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By David A. Keeps
For those who have always wanted to see David Hasselhoff's house, Lifetime has a series for you. In conjunction with Beverly Hills-based Julien's Auctions, the network will debut "Celebrity Home Raiders" on Thursday at 10 p.m. The premise couldn't be simpler: Stars put personal belongings up for sale, with proceeds going to the charity of their choosing. Here's the twist: While the host, Kit Hoover from "Access Hollywood," gets the celebrities to put a dollar value on their memorabilia, Julien's co-owners Darren Julien and Martin Nolan roam through the residence looking for goodies.
OPINION
February 25, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The manipulation of human genes could lead to profound advances in our ability to cure or prevent terrible diseases. But in some cases, it might also mean introducing genetic material that could be passed from one generation to the next, changing the human gene pool in a manner that could inadvertently harm peoples' health. Such "inheritable" DNA is a hotly debated issue among bioethicists, and one that an advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration will review Tuesday and Wednesday as it considers whether human trials should be allowed for a new therapy that could prevent a rare but devastating inherited disorder.
SCIENCE
January 29, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Mating between Neanderthals and the ancestors of Europeans and East Asians gave our forebears important evolutionary advantages but may have created a lot of sterile males, wiping out much of that primitive DNA, new genetic studies suggest.  The comparison of Neanderthal and modern human genomes, published online Wednesday in the journals Nature and Science , identified specific sequences of altered DNA that both Neanderthals and several...
SCIENCE
January 29, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
The ancestors of most modern humans mated with Neanderthals and made off with important swaths of DNA that helped them adapt to new environments, scientists reported Wednesday. Some of the genes gained from these trysts linger in people of European and East Asian descent, though many others were wiped out by natural selection, according to reports published simultaneously by the journals Nature and Science. The stretches of Neanderthal DNA that remain include genes that altered hair and pigment, as well as others that strengthened the immune system, the scientists wrote.
SCIENCE
January 21, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Fish don't have fingers, but they could. That conclusion, drawn by a team of researchers in Switzerland, casts new light on the evolution of four-legged land vertebrates, suggesting that a flick of a switch could have repurposed the bony radials of fins to become the fingers and toes of land-based animals. The DNA programming architecture necessary to create such digits was present in the ancient genome of fish, before the emergence of amphibians, according to the researchers, who published their findings Tuesday in the online journal PLOS Biology.
OPINION
January 19, 2014 | By Luke Glowacki
Do genes make us do it? The idea that human behavior is driven by genes makes many people uncomfortable, and nowhere is the dispute more bitter than when discussing the biological underpinnings of violence. The war of ideas over violence and human nature has raged since the 1600s, when philosopher Thomas Hobbes first speculated that the "natural condition of mankind" was one of violence and conflict. In the 1700s, Jean-Jacques Rousseau saw things differently. Enthralled with accounts of the New World, he argued that civilization, not nature, shaped the human propensity for violence.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Resveratrol, the plant compound found in red wine and reputed to have anti-aging effects, including protection against cancer and diabetes, has just had a "told-you-so" moment. Resveratrol 's discoverer, the embattled Harvard professor who hopes it will point the way to new anti-aging drugs, long argued that the phytonutrient worked its magic by "turning on" the SIRT1 gene. The SIRT1 gene, one of a family of genes, the Sirtuins, is believed to control the good function and longevity of cells and, in turn, of their host.
NEWS
December 27, 1985
Yale University biologists said they have discovered a gene that guides protein building in fruit flies and hope it will help them learn more about cell growth in humans. Spyros Artavanis-Tsakonas, associate professor of biology at the New Haven, Conn., school, said the fruit fly gene produces a protein important to cell development, with striking similarities to a substance known as Epidermal Growth Factor, or EGF, found in humans and mice.
SCIENCE
December 30, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Ready yourself for the real-life glowing green menagerie. Ten little piggies that glow in the dark have been created by scientists at the South China Agricultural University. (See the video above.) A sheep that glows green under a black light will soon be announced by researchers in Turkey, and that same Turkish team has already created  glow-in-the-dark bunnies .  By the light of day these animals all look normal. But turn off the lights and hit them with a black light and parts of their bodies glow fluorescent green.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Elon Musk, who heads electric-car company Tesla Motors, has shelled out $6.75 million on the former Gene Wilder estate in Bel-Air, property records show. That's a lot of clams for a cracked driveway. [Updated 10:59 a.m. PST Nov. 5: The sellers are financier Paul Kessler and his wife, attorney and businesswoman Diana Derycz-Kessler, who invest in real estate. ] The three-quarter-acre promontory home, overlooking the 13th green and 14th fairway of the Bel-Air Country Club, was described in the listing as an “opportunity to develop a view property.” The existing ranch-style home of 2,800 square feet has three bedrooms and 4.5 bedrooms.
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