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ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2012
Gene Kelly on Film "An American in Paris" Kelly sings and dances to Gershwin tunes in this 1951 Oscar best picture winner "Anchors Aweigh" Kelly meets Tom and Jerry in this 1945 musical, for which he earned a lead actor Oscar nomination "Cover Girl" Kelly and Rita Hayworth dance up a storm in this 1944 musical-comedy
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Rebecca Trounson
Bob Thomas, a Los Angeles-based reporter and columnist who covered entertainment for the Associated Press for more than six decades, writing compelling, human and often humorous stories about Hollywood's glittering and glamorous, has died. He was 92. Thomas, who also wrote biographies of many of the stars and studio chiefs of Hollywood's Golden Age, including Joan Crawford, Fred Astaire, William Holden and Walt Disney, died Friday of age-related causes at his home in Encino, his daughter Nancy said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1996
Re "Gene Kelly Dies; Legendary Dancer Was 83," Feb. 1: In the '40s and '50s I spent numerous Saturday afternoons singing and dancing my way home from the Golden State Theater in East L.A. after Gene Kelly movies. In the '60s, on a trip to Paris, I searched fruitlessly up and down the banks of the Seine for the spot where he danced with Leslie Caron in "An American in Paris" only to realize it must have been the sound stage at MGM. Thank you, Mr. Kelly, for the magic, the music and the memories.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By David Ng
Vincente Minnelli shot the bulk of his 1951 movie "An American in Paris" on soundstages in Culver City. For the long-gestating stage-musical version of the classic film, producers have chosen Paris itself for the big premiere. "An American in Paris" is scheduled to debut at the Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris in December 2014, organizers have announced. The English-language production -- which will be directed by ballet veteran Christopher Wheeldon -- is aiming for a Broadway run in the spring of 2015.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1996
Re Twyla Tharp's Gene Kelly appreciation ("Gene Kelly: The Charming Maestro of Movement," Feb. 7) and her reference to his loafers. It reminded me of the one time I met the great showman. A friend and I were late to an evening of Ghanaian music in the basement of UCLA's Schoenberg Hall in the early '60s. Kelly arrived at the same time and seemed lost, so we walked him down with us. What most struck me were those marvelous, supple, magical penny loafers and his grace of motion. I bought a pair the next day and have worn them ever since.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012
Fred Astaire's 1943 musical comedy-drama "The Sky's the Limit" received mixed reactions from critics, as did Gene Kelly's first film after serving in World War II, 1947's "Living in a Big Way. " But time can change perceptions. Both films, which were just released by Warner Archive on DVD, deserve a second chance. "The Sky's the Limit" finds Astaire as a Flying Tiger pilot on leave. The best moment is when a drunken Astaire introduces the Harold Arlen-Johnny Mercer standard "One for My Baby (and "One More for the Road")
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1996 | TWYLA THARP, Twyla Tharp's most recent work is "Mr. Worldly Wise" for the Royal Ballet in London. Her new ensemble, Tharp!, will perform at the Wiltern Theater in September as part of the UCLA Performing Arts Series
Gene Kelly is rightly credited with bringing a massive and much needed dose of vitality, masculinity and athleticism to American dance. The reason for this achievement was simple--Kelly, who died last week at the age of 83, had the common sense to realize the plain fact that there is honor in showing work, in dropping the pretense of effortlessness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1994
Entertainer Gene Kelly was hospitalized after suffering a mild stroke, officials at UCLA Medical Center said Sunday. Kelly, 81, was in stable condition and resting comfortably, hospital spokesman Chris Woodson said. Kelly, known for his singing and dancing in Hollywood musicals such as "An American in Paris" and "Singin' in the Rain," was admitted to the hospital Saturday, Woodson said. Woodson said he did not know when Kelly would be released.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1990 | From Reuters
"Phantom of the Opera" star and Tony Award winner Michael Crawford says he owes his success to Gene Kelly, who once scolded him out for not being expressive enough. "Without his help I doubt whether I'd have ever reached this point," Crawford said of his mentor in an interview. The two met during the making of the movie version of "Hello, Dolly!" in 1968, when the veteran song-and-dance man was directing Crawford, then 26, in one of his first starring roles.
NEWS
February 3, 1996 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gene Kelly, the exuberant, charismatic hoofer who danced, sang, smiled and splashed his way into the hearts of generations, died Friday after several years of declining health. He was 83. As respected as he was likable, Kelly "died peacefully in his sleep" in his Beverly Hills home with his wife, Patricia, at his bedside, according to his publicist, Warren Cowan. Kelly had suffered strokes in 1994 and 1995 and had been in ill health since then. His life was the stuff of a Hollywood musical.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Even her dog could swim. That's one of my favorite memories from interviewing swimmer-turned-movie-star Esther Williams at her house in Beverly Hills in 1984. Williams, who died Thursday morning at the age of 91, was delightful talking about her fabled past at MGM. And of course her house had a pool - that's where her little terrier would dog paddle. Like many baby boomers, I grew up watching the former swimming champ's vastly entertaining MGM Technicolor musicals like 1944's "Bathing Beauty" and 1949's "Neptune's Daughter" on television, swooning over her extravagant, almost psychedelic swimming routines.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2012
Gene Kelly on Film "An American in Paris" Kelly sings and dances to Gershwin tunes in this 1951 Oscar best picture winner "Anchors Aweigh" Kelly meets Tom and Jerry in this 1945 musical, for which he earned a lead actor Oscar nomination "Cover Girl" Kelly and Rita Hayworth dance up a storm in this 1944 musical-comedy
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
There are myriad reasons why the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is celebrating Gene Kelly's centennial with two special evenings this Thursday and Friday. After all, he was the complete package, an innovative actor, dancer, choreographer and director. But let's not forget another obvious fact - few dancers have looked as sexy on the silver screen. While lean, dapper Fred Astaire, who came into films almost a decade before Kelly in 1933, often danced dressed in a top hat, white tie and tails, the athletic Kelly preferred tight, form-fitting pants and shirts.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012
Fred Astaire's 1943 musical comedy-drama "The Sky's the Limit" received mixed reactions from critics, as did Gene Kelly's first film after serving in World War II, 1947's "Living in a Big Way. " But time can change perceptions. Both films, which were just released by Warner Archive on DVD, deserve a second chance. "The Sky's the Limit" finds Astaire as a Flying Tiger pilot on leave. The best moment is when a drunken Astaire introduces the Harold Arlen-Johnny Mercer standard "One for My Baby (and "One More for the Road")
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2011
The Hollywood Bowl has long been a favorite place to shoot movie and TV scenes. One of the first major films to shoot at the Bowl was 1937's iconic tale of Hollywood, "A Star Is Born" — that's where fledgling actress Janet Gaynor encounters drunk superstar Norman Maine (Fredric March). Frank Sinatra and Gene Kelly sneak into the Bowl in 1945's "Anchors Aweigh. " Other films using the Cahuenga Pass landmark are 1944's "Double Indemnity" and 1980's "Xanadu. " TV series that have filmed there include "The Beverly Hillbillies," "Seinfeld" and "Melrose Place.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2010 | Susan King
Born Margarita Cansino in Brooklyn, NY, in 1918, Rita Hayworth began her career as professional nightclub dancer before entering movies as a teenager in 1935's "Dante's Inferno. " In 1937, she was signed by Columbia Studios and got her big break as Richard Barthelmess' wife in the 1939 Howard Hawks' classic, "Only Angels Have Wings. " During the 1940s, Hayworth was known as "The Love Goddess" and she starred in musicals ? she was dubbed because she couldn't sing ? film noirs and period dramas.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1996 | ROBERT HILBURN
It's easy to see why Will Friedwald couldn't make it past the first sentence of his affectionate liner notes for this survey of Gene Kelly's musical moments on film without mentioning Fred Astaire. Though they sing together on only one of the album's selections ("The Babbitt and the Bromide" from 1946), their careers were virtually inseparable. Kelly and Astaire were both superb dancers whose routines are among the highlights of American movie history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1989
Venerable actor and dancer Gene Kelly has been hospitalized with pneumonia, forcing him to cancel a planned show in La Mirada, theater officials said Thursday. "An Evening With Gene Kelly," the show set to open tonight at the La Mirada Civic Theater, was canceled after Kelly's agent reported the star of Broadway and Hollywood musicals had been hospitalized with pneumonia, theater spokeswoman Donna Heckenlaible said. "All we know is that Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2010 | By Susan King
The Method Fest Independent Film Festival, which celebrates the art of the actor, opens Thursday at the Regency Agoura 9 in Agoura Hills with James Ivory's latest film, "The City of Your Final Destination," starring Anthony Hopkins. Among the 30 features and 59 shorts at the festival, which continues through Wednesday, will be "The Good Heart," with Brian Cox, "The Lightkeepers " with Richard Dreyfuss and Bruce Dern, who also will be honored at the festival, and "The Greatest," with Pierce Brosnan and Susan Sarandon.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2009 | By Susan King
Leslie Caron says she got rid of the "deadwood" writing her autobiography, "Thank Heaven." "I must say writing this book, it is a new world for me," the lithe 78-year-old film star reports. "In the end it was very cathartic." The candid, lyrically written tome of the French actress' storied life chronicles her childhood in Paris, her suffering through World War II, her teenage years as a ballet dancer with Roland Petit's acclaimed company where she was discovered by Gene Kelly, her career at MGM starring in such classics as "An American in Paris," "Lili," "Daddy Long Legs" and "Gigi," her two Oscar nominations, her three failed marriages and high-profile love affair with Warren Beatty, her mother's suicide and her own battles with depression and alcohol.
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