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January 6, 1990 | DAVE DISTEL
Please allow me to engage in an exercise in what I'll call subjective trivia. The idea is to identify the San Diegan who enjoyed the longest and most successful career in professional sports. One name that comes to mind, of course, is Ted Williams. He's not even close to my candidate. A clue? My candidate is still enjoying his long and successful career.
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March 16, 1997 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dawn patrol with Gene Littler and friends. There were few distractions and even fewer spectators. The greens were nicer and they got a brisk morning walk. And there about ends the up side. "I've learned that if you're driving to the course in the dark and you're finished before lunch, then you're not shooting very good," said Littler, 66. Littler, Deane Beman and Lou Graham were first off Saturday in the Toshiba Senior Classic's second round. They began at 7:35 a.m.
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SPORTS
July 10, 1988 | BRIAN HEWITT, Times Staff Writer
Doug Sanders, the Aesop of the PGA Seniors Tour, appreciates a good story. He tells a better one. You may remember Sanders as the golfer from the '60s with the pastel shoes, the lavender pants, the fuchsia golf shirts, the purple vocabulary and the Kodachrome personality. Right now he is sitting under a corporate tent sipping a light beer. He has just finished a round of golf with four amateurs who have paid handsomely for the right to see him hit wedge shots and hear him spin yarns.
SPORTS
March 5, 1994 | DAN HAFNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was 40 years ago that a slender youngster with the sweetest swing this side of heaven came out of San Diego to make a name for himself in professional golf. Gene Littler will be 64 in July but despite illness, injury and numerous surgeries, he still has that sweet swing. In only his third tournament since rotator cuff surgery nine months ago, Littler fired a five-under-par 65 Friday in the opening round of the $550,000 GTE West Classic at Ojai Valley Inn & Country Club.
SPORTS
March 16, 1997 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dawn patrol with Gene Littler and friends. There were few distractions and even fewer spectators. The greens were nicer and they got a brisk morning walk. And there about ends the up side. "I've learned that if you're driving to the course in the dark and you're finished before lunch, then you're not shooting very good," said Littler, 66. Littler, Deane Beman and Lou Graham were first off Saturday in the Toshiba Senior Classic's second round. They began at 7:35 a.m.
SPORTS
October 4, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Gene Littler, braving chilly, windy conditions, birdied three of the last four holes Saturday on the way to a three-under-par 67 and a one-stroke lead at 137 in the PGA Seniors Tour's $1-million Vantage Championship at Clemmons, N.C. Temperatures were unseasonably cool, hovering in the 50s. But it was the wind, which gusted to 25 m.p.h., that caused the most trouble as only six players in the 72-man field broke par. Littler's closest pursuer, Gay Brewer, shot a 71 and was at 138.
SPORTS
March 5, 1994 | DAN HAFNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was 40 years ago that a slender youngster with the sweetest swing this side of heaven came out of San Diego to make a name for himself in professional golf. Gene Littler will be 64 in July but despite illness, injury and numerous surgeries, he still has that sweet swing. In only his third tournament since rotator cuff surgery nine months ago, Littler fired a five-under-par 65 Friday in the opening round of the $550,000 GTE West Classic at Ojai Valley Inn & Country Club.
SPORTS
April 29, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Gene Littler sank a downhill 30-foot birdie putt on the final hole Sunday to give him and partner Don January a come-from-behind one-shot victory in the $500,000 Liberty Mutual Legends of Golf tournament at Austin, Tex. Littler sank an equally long birdie putt on the 16th hole, and January made a 10-footer for birdie on 17 en route to a six-under-par 64 for a 257 total, 23 under par. January and Littler, teamed in the tournament for the first time, split $100,000.
SPORTS
October 17, 1989 | DAN HAFNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was more than 35 years ago that Gene Littler first showed his "perfect swing" to professional golfers. Although he will be 60 next year there is no sign that Littler, long known as one of the finest golfers developed in Southern California, is ready to slow down. In fact, Littler, who was still an amateur when he won his first PGA tournament--the San Diego Open in 1954--is playing more than he did when his sweet swing made him one of the best players on the regular tour.
SPORTS
January 6, 1990 | DAVE DISTEL
Please allow me to engage in an exercise in what I'll call subjective trivia. The idea is to identify the San Diegan who enjoyed the longest and most successful career in professional sports. One name that comes to mind, of course, is Ted Williams. He's not even close to my candidate. A clue? My candidate is still enjoying his long and successful career.
SPORTS
October 17, 1989 | DAN HAFNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was more than 35 years ago that Gene Littler first showed his "perfect swing" to professional golfers. Although he will be 60 next year there is no sign that Littler, long known as one of the finest golfers developed in Southern California, is ready to slow down. In fact, Littler, who was still an amateur when he won his first PGA tournament--the San Diego Open in 1954--is playing more than he did when his sweet swing made him one of the best players on the regular tour.
SPORTS
July 10, 1988 | BRIAN HEWITT, Times Staff Writer
Doug Sanders, the Aesop of the PGA Seniors Tour, appreciates a good story. He tells a better one. You may remember Sanders as the golfer from the '60s with the pastel shoes, the lavender pants, the fuchsia golf shirts, the purple vocabulary and the Kodachrome personality. Right now he is sitting under a corporate tent sipping a light beer. He has just finished a round of golf with four amateurs who have paid handsomely for the right to see him hit wedge shots and hear him spin yarns.
SPORTS
October 4, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Gene Littler, braving chilly, windy conditions, birdied three of the last four holes Saturday on the way to a three-under-par 67 and a one-stroke lead at 137 in the PGA Seniors Tour's $1-million Vantage Championship at Clemmons, N.C. Temperatures were unseasonably cool, hovering in the 50s. But it was the wind, which gusted to 25 m.p.h., that caused the most trouble as only six players in the 72-man field broke par. Littler's closest pursuer, Gay Brewer, shot a 71 and was at 138.
SPORTS
April 29, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Gene Littler sank a downhill 30-foot birdie putt on the final hole Sunday to give him and partner Don January a come-from-behind one-shot victory in the $500,000 Liberty Mutual Legends of Golf tournament at Austin, Tex. Littler sank an equally long birdie putt on the 16th hole, and January made a 10-footer for birdie on 17 en route to a six-under-par 64 for a 257 total, 23 under par. January and Littler, teamed in the tournament for the first time, split $100,000.
SPORTS
September 22, 1990 | RICH TOSCHES
The purse for the Senior PGA Tour's 1991 GTE West Classic, to be played the first week of March at Ojai Valley Inn and Country Club, has been increased by $100,000 to $450,000 in prize money, it was announced Friday. First prize will be $67,500, an increase of $15,000 from last year's event. The 54-hole tournament will be held March 1-3. Arnold Palmer will play, along with defending champion Walter Zembriski.
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