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Gene Roddenberry

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2009 | Associated Press
The creator of "Star Trek" and his wife will spend eternity together in space. Celestis Inc., a company that specializes in "memorial spaceflights," said that it will ship the remains of Gene Roddenberry and Majel Barrett Roddenberry into space next year. The couple's cremated remains will be sealed into specially made capsules designed to withstand the rigors of space travel. A rocket-launched spacecraft will carry the capsules, along with digitized tributes from fans. After Gene Roddenberry died in 1991, his wife commissioned Celestis to launch a part of his remains into space in 1997.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By Susan King
Though “Star Trek” made them household names, the cast of the seminal 1966-69 NBC series had been acting on stage, film and TV for several years. One regular sang with Duke Ellington and another was a member the cast of the Canadian version of “Howdy Doody.” Several had worked with "Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry before. So with the blockbuster summer movie “Star Trek Into Darkness” opening Thursday, here's a look back at the lives and careers of William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, James Doohan, DeForest Kelley, George Takei, Nichelle Nichols and Walter Koenig before they signed on to the crew of the Starship Enterprise.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1991
The loss of Gene Roddenberry will leave a gap in our collective consciousness that will be difficult to fill. I hope that enough people have, like me, been inspired by his vision of a hopeful, harmonious future for humanity to make it more than just a dream. Roddenberry lived long (long enough to make a difference), and he prospered, but we should not spend much time mourning him. We've a lot of work to do, if we are to meet the challenges that he left with us. PAUL McELLIGOTTFullerton
NATIONAL
September 7, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
The Google Doodle's "Star Trek" tribute offers up a fine way to waste some time on a Friday: an interactive homage to the groundbreaking television show on its 46th anniversary. "Star Trek" was a relatively short-lived science-fiction series, running from 1966 to 1969. But the show, starring William Shatner as Capt. James T. Kirk and Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock, left an indelible mark on our culture, a mark that exists today. (And we're not just talking about those Priceline Negotiator commercials.)
NEWS
October 25, 1991 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gene Roddenberry, whose "Star Trek" concept of space travel to futuristic civilizations in an often-hostile universe spawned two wildly popular TV series and five movies, died Thursday in Santa Monica. He was 70. A Paramount Pictures spokesman said the "Star Trek" creator was stricken at his West Los Angeles home and was taken to Santa Monica Hospital-Medical Center, where he died at 2:46 p.m. from a blood clot in his heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1992 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the death of "Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry one year ago, his humanistic vision of the future is being more widely embraced on television than ever before. For the first four weeks of its fall season, "Star Trek: The Next Generation" has finished as the No. 1 original program in syndicated television. That marks the longest period of time that the perennial ratings champ, "Wheel of Fortune," has been locked out of the top spot since the A.C. Nielsen Co.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are nearly a dozen literary events happening in Ventura in the next seven days. Famous authors are coming to town, a local author will conduct a seminar, and many bookstores will be jamming and jumping. * "Gene Roddenberry: The Last Conversation" has just been published by the University of California Press as part of its new series, "Portrait of American Genius."
MAGAZINE
October 22, 2006
Although I share Dan Neil's concern about any plans Paramount Pictures may have for the next "Star Trek" feature film, I do not agree that the "franchise" should be abandoned ("Galaxy for Sale," 800 Words, Oct. 1). Certainly the series' creator, Gene Roddenberry, wouldn't feel that way, nor do millions of "Star Trek" fans worldwide. What "Star Trek" does desperately need is some new blood. Hopefully with J.J. Abrams at the helm, the next film will get the ship and her crew back on course!
NEWS
December 20, 1987
We resented the obvious allusions to illicit sex, both verbally and visually, in the Nov. 15 episode of "Star Trek: The Next Generation." What kind of audience is Gene Roddenberry trying to attract? We regret that our children were once again exposed to early evening trash. Why do writers/producers insist on adulterating otherwise imaginative story lines with immorality? Lee and Debbie Noble, Walnut
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1991
Williams may not wish to grow up, but then few do in the mess Hollywood is today. There are ways to behave responsibly while being entertaining or maintaining childhood creativity, which creative geniuses like the late Gene Roddenberry and Jim Henson demonstrated consistently. CLAUDIA DAVIDSON Bakersfield
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2009 | Associated Press
The creator of "Star Trek" and his wife will spend eternity together in space. Celestis Inc., a company that specializes in "memorial spaceflights," said that it will ship the remains of Gene Roddenberry and Majel Barrett Roddenberry into space next year. The couple's cremated remains will be sealed into specially made capsules designed to withstand the rigors of space travel. A rocket-launched spacecraft will carry the capsules, along with digitized tributes from fans. After Gene Roddenberry died in 1991, his wife commissioned Celestis to launch a part of his remains into space in 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2008 | Linda Whitmore
It seems like the logical step: "Star Trek: The Tour" is an interactive exhibit of gadgets, gewgaws and everything Trek guaranteed to get science fiction geeks' (c'mon, you know who you are) antennas twitching. The planned five-year mission kicks off Friday in Long Beach. So we established a com link to that goodwill ambassador from Earth, William Shatner. WHAT DO YOU FEEL IS THE LEGACY OF "STAR TREK?" The legacy of "Star Trek" is a lot of entertainment for many millions of people and a lot of talented people being employed -- in addition to a message for mankind which says everybody deserves a place on this earth and just let them be. HOW MUCH FUN WAS IT TO BE JAMES T. KIRK, CAPTAIN OF THE ENTERPRISE AND UNIVERSAL LADIES' MAN?
MAGAZINE
October 22, 2006
Although I share Dan Neil's concern about any plans Paramount Pictures may have for the next "Star Trek" feature film, I do not agree that the "franchise" should be abandoned ("Galaxy for Sale," 800 Words, Oct. 1). Certainly the series' creator, Gene Roddenberry, wouldn't feel that way, nor do millions of "Star Trek" fans worldwide. What "Star Trek" does desperately need is some new blood. Hopefully with J.J. Abrams at the helm, the next film will get the ship and her crew back on course!
OPINION
May 5, 2005
Re "Strange New World: No 'Star Trek,' " Commentary, May 3: Orson Scott Card claims that the popularity of the "Star Trek" franchise over the years was due to the fact that the public was starving for science fiction but at the same time was largely unsophisticated in its tastes for the genre. To the contrary, it is Card who has failed to achieve a stable orbit. The reason for Gene Roddenberry's success is that it captured a positive vision of the future. "Star Trek," together with the 1968 Stanley Kubrick film "2001: A Space Odyssey," arose during the '60s, a decade of hope in the midst of a culture beset with war, racism and sexism.
OPINION
December 17, 2001
In "Overload of the 'Rings'?" (Dec. 13) you write that without J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy, "most likely there would be no Capt. Kirk, no Luke Skywalker--and definitely no Harry Potter." With regard to Gene Roddenberry's creation: "Star Trek's" Capt. Kirk is a direct descendant of one of Roddenberry's favorite fictional characters, C.S. Forester's Capt. Horatio Hornblower. Roddenberry was also influenced by the Buck Rogers and Flash Gordon serials he saw as a teen in the 1930s and the many pulp novels he read.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2000 | T.L. STANLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Kevin Sorbo--he of the flowing mane and buffed bod--has been inextricably linked to the high-camp action adventure series he starred in, "Hercules: The Legendary Journeys," which sat atop the syndicated heap for much of its six-year original run and still pulls in strong numbers in repeats. But the Minnesota native, who was a model and commercial actor before breaking into Hollywood in the Hercules role, aims to recast himself as a leaner, more thoughtful TV hero.
OPINION
December 17, 2001
In "Overload of the 'Rings'?" (Dec. 13) you write that without J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy, "most likely there would be no Capt. Kirk, no Luke Skywalker--and definitely no Harry Potter." With regard to Gene Roddenberry's creation: "Star Trek's" Capt. Kirk is a direct descendant of one of Roddenberry's favorite fictional characters, C.S. Forester's Capt. Horatio Hornblower. Roddenberry was also influenced by the Buck Rogers and Flash Gordon serials he saw as a teen in the 1930s and the many pulp novels he read.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1991 | RAY BRADBURY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Bradbury is the author of "The Martian Chronicles" and "Fahrenheit 451." and
Gene Roddenberry asked me to be part of the "Star Trek" family as a writer 25 years ago. He showed me the pilot, and I looked at it and liked it but said at that time that I've never been able to adapt other people's characters--no matter how much I admire them. So, one of the sad things of my life is I was never able to participate in the love and joy that made "Star Trek" so special. But, ironically, for many years people have thought I was Gene Roddenberry.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1999 | SHAUNA SNOW
MovieFone Force--4 Million: Although there were no "Star Wars" sales figures released by distributor 20th Century Fox on Thursday, MovieFone Inc. said that 4 million people had used its telephone and Internet services since it began selling the "Phantom Menace" tickets at noon Wednesday. Of those users, 95% of tickets sold were for "Star Wars," a company spokeswoman said, though she declined to disclose actual sales figures or how many of the 4 million users made purchases.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't expect any star cruisers and battleships whizzing through space or any pesky Klingons and Borgs in the new syndicated sci-fi series that bears Gene Roddenberry's name. This time around, the creator of the classic "Star Trek" series has brought the aliens to Earth. "It's kind of turning the tables [on "Star Trek"]," says his widow, Majel Barrett Roddenberry, an executive producer of "Gene Roddenberry's Earth: Final Conflict," which airs Saturdays on KTLA-TV Channel 5.
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