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Gene Upshaw

SPORTS
September 30, 1994 | STEVE SPRINGER
Gene Upshaw, executive director of the NFL Players Assn., visited the Raiders' El Segundo training headquarters Wednesday to answer player questions about the salary cap. "This is the first year of the system," he said, "and there are so many misconceptions." Criticized for accepting a cap system, Upshaw feels vindicated somewhat by the similar demands being made by baseball and hockey owners. "You can paint stripes on a donkey and call it a zebra," Upshaw said, "but it's still a donkey.
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SPORTS
June 12, 1993 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gene Upshaw, the labor leader who ran the campaign that won free agency for pro football, was both captain and player rep of the Raiders during their winning era. And as they tell it now, they have never known a more inspirational leader than the old pro who has spent the last 10 of his 47 years struggling against the NFL's 28 club owners.
SPORTS
July 9, 1992 | From Associated Press
Gene Upshaw, executive director of the NFL Players Assn., testified Wednesday at the antitrust trial against the league that one of the members of the owners' negotiating team compared pro football players to cattle on a ranch during 1987 contract talks. Upshaw, testifying for the first time in the month-old trial, said that Tex Schramm, then the president of the Dallas Cowboys, told him there would not be free agency in the NFL even if the players remained on teams for 30 years.
SPORTS
October 9, 1990 | Times Wire Services
The NFL players' union Monday suggested all members of the news media, male and female, be barred from locker rooms and separate interview areas be set up to assure privacy for the players. "NFL players should be afforded absolute privacy in their locker rooms," Gene Upshaw, executive director of the NFL Players Assn., said in a statement from his union's headquarters in Washington, D.C. "They should not be expected or required to participate in media interviews unless fully clothed."
SPORTS
June 24, 1990 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a humid afternoon at a training camp in Wisconsin 34 years ago, the Green Bay Packers were told, as usual, to put on the same old, wet sweat socks and athletic supporters they'd worn at morning practice--or bring their own. Rebelling at last, they said: "Enough is enough." Said management: "Do it our way or retire from football." But in unity, there is power. What they really needed, the Packers decided that day, was a union--the first in a league that was already 36 years old.
SPORTS
March 15, 1990 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The NFL will begin random testing of its players for steroids this summer, Commissioner Paul Tagliabue announced Wednesday. "I think this will solve the steroid problem," Tagliabue said of a program that will subject every player to the possibility of testing on four occasions during the year.
SPORTS
November 8, 1989 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the last eight years, the average annual salary for a National Football League player--as bargained for individually with club managers--has jumped from about $100,000 to about $300,000. At the same time, each player's annual benefits package--as worked out in collective bargaining with the league--has remained unchanged at about $50,000. Those numbers brought an extraordinary response from the NFL Players Assn. this week.
SPORTS
February 15, 1989
The U.S. Justice Department has closed its investigation of the National Football League Players Assn. and union head Gene Upshaw after finding no wrongdoing. Upshaw blamed the media, primarily the Boston Globe and the Ft. Wayne (Ind.) Sentinel for making "reckless charges" and creating a "trial by headlines." The financial records of the NFLPA and Upshaw have been under review by the U.S. attorney's office since October.
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