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Genealogy

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1999 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than most people, Roman Rakover is aware of the hole, torn by the Nazis, in the fabric of every European Jewish family. A dozen years ago, the Calabasas man sat down to compile a genealogy of the Rakover family and to write its history. The project took him five years and resulted in a book that traces 13 generations of the family, from Rakover's great- great-great-great-great-great- grandfather and two of his brothers, down to 81-year-old Rakover, his many cousins and their children.
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NATIONAL
January 31, 2010 | By Mark Silva
President Obama has found another long-lost cousin: Scott Brown, the Republican state senator from Massachusetts who won the Senate seat long held by the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy. The president and the senator-elect are 10th cousins, according to the New England Historic Genealogical Society. Brown's victory Jan. 19 over Democratic candidate Martha Coakley cost the Democrats their filibuster-proof majority in the Senate and may have jeopardized passage of Obama's top legislative priority -- a healthcare overhaul.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | MICHAEL WHITE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For more than a decade Paul Isaacson has labored to save the souls of his dead ancestors, patiently searching miles of microfilm and stacks of catalogues in the Mormon Church's Family History Library. Mormon missionary work isn't limited to the living, and each day thousands of the faithful flock to the library, the world's largest repository of genealogical records, to fulfill the church's determination to baptize every person who ever lived.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cozkacuauhtli Zenteotl was once known as Eduardo Rivera. For 18 years, he didn't think much about his name until one day he realized that, unlike many of his white and African American classmates, he knew very little about his family's history. "Their roots went back to Europe and Africa," he said. "But me? I did not know how I came about."
NEWS
September 9, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly three years Isidore Myers has been obsessed with researching, writing and publishing a book he has no intention of selling. "Remember: A Book to Honor the Family I Never Knew" is a self-published labor of love designed to preserve Myers' family history and, in so doing, keep alive the memories of 115 Polish relatives verified to have been murdered in Nazi extermination camps during World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1996 | JEFF McDONALD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For most of her 34 years, Theresa Ann Gray has viewed her life as rootless and incomplete, like a jigsaw puzzle short some key pieces. Much of her adulthood has been spent searching for the woman who gave her life from a Camarillo State Hospital bed 27 minutes before midnight on a crisp spring night in 1962. The auburn-haired birth mother, a mental patient at the state hospital, gave the infant Theresa up for adoption weeks after she was born.
NEWS
May 26, 1987 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
They are the most traditional-looking Indians in Santa Barbara County. Many wear their hair in braids and dress in full Indian regalia at public hearings. Some have assumed names such as White Bear and Mushu. They have more political power, county officials say, and have made more money monitoring construction sites for Chumash artifacts than any other Indian group in the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two tablespoons of blood drawn from each of 100,000 volunteers will soon help Brigham Young University researchers create a DNA database and trace family trees back 15 generations. Officials with the high-tech genealogy project have traveled to Southern California several times during the last year to collect blood from locals who can trace their family histories back at least four generations.
NEWS
August 31, 1986
Some came with reluctance but to others, the idea was irresistible as more than 2,000 descendants of slaves gathered on the plantation where their forebears toiled. "I know if any of our ancestors are buried here, they are turning over in their graves and singing, 'Hallelujah!"' said Mabel Phelps of Norfolk, Va., at the Somerset Plantation in Creswell, N.C. Others were less enthusiastic at first. "My first reaction was, 'By golly, why should we be digging up those kind of memories?'
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | MYRA VANDERPOOL GORMLEY, Gormley is author of a recently published book titled "Family Diseases: Are You at Risk? . "
Question: Are family periodicals worth subscribing to? Answer: "One-name" (surname) family periodicals (often called newsletters) vary in quality and value. A few are outstanding; some are poorly edited and compiled. Most are modestly priced ($3 to $20 a year). Try a year's subscription to evaluate it. Q: How do I find names, addresses and prices of current family periodicals?
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