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NEWS
April 28, 1990 | MARILYN PITTS, Marilyn Pitts is a free-lancer writer based in Santa Ana.
Nearly 400 years ago, Pedro Robledo left Mexico with the Juan de Ornate expedition, venturing into what is now New Mexico, to become one of the first settlers in that region. Today, his 13th-great-granddaughter, Pauline Chavez Bent, a genealogist who specializes in Latino history, travels uncharted terrain of a different nature, searching back through time to meticulously piece together her family's history.
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NEWS
September 29, 1998 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Most of the population of modern China--one-fifth of all the people living today--owes its genetic origins to Africa, an international scientific team said today in research that undercuts any claim that modern humans may have originated independently in China.
NEWS
June 8, 1994 | ANDREA HEIMAN
Start by interviewing relatives, asking them questions about your family history. Record names, dates and places. Use an audio or videotape. Research materials found in your home. Look for genealogical information in family Bibles, diaries, wills, baby books and letters, and on the backs of pictures. Contact other family members about your search. There is a chance that another family member may be working on a history too.
NEWS
January 25, 2000 | JOSE CARDENAS
When doing genealogical research, you have to be ready for surprises that may make your ancestors seem a little less romantic. Just ask Aaron and Sylvia Magdaleno. The Santa Ana couple have traced their families to the 1600s--deep into Mexico, along the border and into the United States--through church, prison and trial records, census data and personal accounts. They've met some colorful characters in their pasts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2000 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
Blame it on the Girl Scouts. More than 20 years ago, Doug Miller was asked to guide his daughter's Girl Scout troop through a badge called Your Family History. The result was that Miller tumbled to the sometimes obsessive pleasures of genealogy (his daughter Lynn sewed on her badge and showed no further interest in the subject). His curiosity piqued, Miller sought out the closest archive of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1994 | REBECCA BRYANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ever wonder where your family tree is rooted? About great-great-great-Aunt Mildred who gave you your middle name? Whether your ancestors were pilgrims, princes or pirates? A team of sleuths in Burbank is used to these types of inquiries. The volunteers at the Southern California Genealogical Society Library consider themselves more detectives than librarians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cozkacuauhtli Zenteotl was once known as Eduardo Rivera. For 18 years, he didn't think much about his name until one day he realized that, unlike many of his white and African-American classmates, he knew very little about his family's history. "Their roots went back to Europe and Africa," he said. "But me? I did not know how I came about."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
Two centuries after the Lewis and Clark expedition trekked through the unexplored West to Oregon, a group is looking for the descendants they left behind. They could number in the thousands today, but the Lewis & Clark Corps of Discovery Descendant Project wants to publish a genealogical catalog of every descendant of the 34 members of the famed expedition, including descendants of brothers, sisters and even cousins of expedition members. The deadline: Dec.
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