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February 26, 2007 | Erika Hayasaki, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Al Sharpton said Sunday it was the "most shocking" news of his life when the civil rights leader learned he was a descendant of a slave owned by relatives of Strom Thurmond, the late senator who once led the segregationist South. "I couldn't describe the emotions that I've had over the last two or three days thinking about this," he said at a news conference. "Everything from anger and outrage to reflection, and to some pride and glory."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1995 | GEOFF BOUCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With the national publication Friday of a paper by a UC Irvine evolutionary biologist, another dissenting salvo has been fired at the controversial theory that modern-day human genes can be traced back some 200,000 years to a sole genetic mother. The latest edition of the journal Science features a seven-page paper by professor Francisco Ayala that disputes the nearly decade-old theory that one woman, or the "mitochondrial Eve," in Africa was the prime mother of modern-day humans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1991 | ZION BANKS
Tony Blackwell is quick to pull out his card that certifies he is the 799th descendant of Col. John Washington. After all, it took the 74-year-old Tustin resident eight years of searching history books and public records to discover that Washington was the paternal grandfather of George Washington, the first President of the United States.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alex Haley told friends he was just a writer trying to make a living. But his death is a poignant reminder that the former Coast Guard cook tapped the hearts of Americans with two monumental books that transcended literature to become cultural icons. "Roots" and "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" inspired millions to trace their family origins, take pride in racial identity and broaden their grasp of history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind the colonial church where her father was baptized nearly a century ago, Teresa Maldonado Parker on Tuesday celebrated her first Mexican Christmas. Under streams of colorful banners on Auza Street in this small agricultural community, dozens of neighborhood children and distant cousins lit candles and sparklers and rocked baby Jesus in blankets on Christmas Eve. They shared sweets and punch. There were no gifts, no trees, no Santa Claus.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | MARILYN PITTS, Marilyn Pitts is a free-lancer writer based in Santa Ana.
Nearly 400 years ago, Pedro Robledo left Mexico with the Juan de Ornate expedition, venturing into what is now New Mexico, to become one of the first settlers in that region. Today, his 13th-great-granddaughter, Pauline Chavez Bent, a genealogist who specializes in Latino history, travels uncharted terrain of a different nature, searching back through time to meticulously piece together her family's history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2002 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most days, researchers camped out in Laguna Niguel's National Archives reference room chitchat about the past as they untangle the threads of family history. In recent weeks, though, the talk has been about the future--today, to be precise, when archivists believe the unsealing of 72-year-old census will set off a mad scramble of genealogists hungry for what one called "the first fresh meat" in a decade.
NEWS
September 29, 1998 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Most of the population of modern China--one-fifth of all the people living today--owes its genetic origins to Africa, an international scientific team said today in research that undercuts any claim that modern humans may have originated independently in China.
NEWS
June 8, 1994 | ANDREA HEIMAN
Start by interviewing relatives, asking them questions about your family history. Record names, dates and places. Use an audio or videotape. Research materials found in your home. Look for genealogical information in family Bibles, diaries, wills, baby books and letters, and on the backs of pictures. Contact other family members about your search. There is a chance that another family member may be working on a history too.
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