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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2000 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The search for the past can require the patience of a gold miner, swirling and sifting the silt. Then, suddenly, there's a glint of precious material. Carmen Brussard's hundreds of hours hunched over microfiche ultimately led to this stunning discovery: She and her husband, who met at a dance in Los Angeles 34 years ago, are not the first joint love story from their respective families.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With two tablespoons of blood drawn from each of 100,000 volunteers worldwide, Brigham Young University researchers hope to create a DNA database that will use genetic markers to help reconstruct family trees going back 15 generations. Officials with the high-tech genealogy project have traveled to Southern California a few times over the last year to collect blood from people who can trace their family histories back at least four generations.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | TROY CORLEY, Corley is a Southland free-lance writer
Virginia and Bob Emrey blame their genealogy habit on an earthquake that shook Glendale about 40 years ago. The quake so upset a neighbor that the Emreys offered their help. During the resulting friendship, the neighbor, who was a genealogist, "proved to me that I was related to her late husband," said Bob Emrey. "That's how we got mixed up in this mess."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1991 | ROSE APODACA
Pauline Chavez-Bent first started documenting her family tree in a baby book when her oldest child was born 35 years ago. "My mother was with me while I filled it out, and off the top of her head she gave me five generations on my father's side and six on her side," she said. "I eventually went back eight generations while I was raising my three kids. I thought, 'Great, that's enough.'
NATIONAL
October 24, 2002 | From Associated Press
The Mormon Church has put millions of 19th century ancestors on its genealogy Web site, giving family tree buffs a more convenient -- and free -- way to trace their heritage. The church said Wednesday it is offering free Internet access to 55 million names from the 1880 United States census and the 1881 Canadian census. Before, census records from those years were available on a microfilm set spanning 56 compact discs -- a search process many found cumbersome and time-consuming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1995 | GEOFF BOUCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With the national publication Friday of a paper by a UC Irvine evolutionary biologist, another dissenting salvo has been fired at the controversial theory that modern-day human genes can be traced back some 200,000 years to a sole genetic mother. The latest edition of the journal Science features a seven-page paper by professor Francisco Ayala that disputes the nearly decade-old theory that one woman, or the "mitochondrial Eve," in Africa was the prime mother of modern-day humans.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2007 | Erika Hayasaki, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Al Sharpton said Sunday it was the "most shocking" news of his life when the civil rights leader learned he was a descendant of a slave owned by relatives of Strom Thurmond, the late senator who once led the segregationist South. "I couldn't describe the emotions that I've had over the last two or three days thinking about this," he said at a news conference. "Everything from anger and outrage to reflection, and to some pride and glory."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1991 | ZION BANKS
Tony Blackwell is quick to pull out his card that certifies he is the 799th descendant of Col. John Washington. After all, it took the 74-year-old Tustin resident eight years of searching history books and public records to discover that Washington was the paternal grandfather of George Washington, the first President of the United States.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alex Haley told friends he was just a writer trying to make a living. But his death is a poignant reminder that the former Coast Guard cook tapped the hearts of Americans with two monumental books that transcended literature to become cultural icons. "Roots" and "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" inspired millions to trace their family origins, take pride in racial identity and broaden their grasp of history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 2004 | Stephanie Chavez, Times Staff Writer
Toni Scott packed the remnants of her family history into a plastic grocery bag -- dozens of tattered and sepia-toned photographs of mostly strangers, passed on to her by her deceased grandmother. With care, she pulled her baby book out of the bag and gently opened the brittle pages to show off her family tree. "Except for the name of his mother, my father's side of the tree is empty," said the 58-year-old Los Angeles special education teacher.
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