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Genealogy

NATIONAL
October 24, 2002 | From Associated Press
The Mormon Church has put millions of 19th century ancestors on its genealogy Web site, giving family tree buffs a more convenient -- and free -- way to trace their heritage. The church said Wednesday it is offering free Internet access to 55 million names from the 1880 United States census and the 1881 Canadian census. Before, census records from those years were available on a microfilm set spanning 56 compact discs -- a search process many found cumbersome and time-consuming.
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NEWS
August 18, 2002 | MELANIE COFFEE, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
Janis Minor Forte found her great-grandfather in a jail document: He was listed among the possessions his owner had lost in a bet. "Needless to say, I let out a holler," Forte said. The discovery was chilling and exhilarating: "a certain Negro man slave, Walton, about 26 years of age and of black complexion." Forte had found another slave in her family tree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2002 | ERIN CHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marie Padilla has always loved her niece "Bertie," remembering how she once read the child stories, bought her dresses and pushed her on park swings. She remembers, too, the day she said goodbye, 50 years ago. "It was awful," the 92-year-old Whittier woman said. "She thought I didn't want her anymore. I missed her a lot.... I was her 'Mama Rie.' " Padilla cared for her niece in the early 1950s, when Bertie's mother struggled with epileptic seizures and her father battled alcoholism.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2002 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of Thomas Jefferson's descendants decided Sunday that DNA tests and historic evidence are not enough to admit relatives of Sally Hemings, a Jefferson slave, as bona fide members of their organization. The Monticello Assn., whose 700 members are descended from Jefferson and his daughters, Martha and Maria, opted not to welcome the Hemings family into the organization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2002 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are no babies in this hamlet headed for ghostdom on the edge of the Mojave Desert, population 23. "Study the Past" reads the inscription above the swinging gate into Dennis and Jo Ann Casebier's compound, otherwise known as Goffs Cultural Center. If the desert has an attic stuffed with memorabilia, this is it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2002 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most days, researchers camped out in Laguna Niguel's National Archives reference room chitchat about the past as they untangle the threads of family history. In recent weeks, though, the talk has been about the future--today, to be precise, when archivists believe the unsealing of 72-year-old census will set off a mad scramble of genealogists hungry for what one called "the first fresh meat" in a decade.
NEWS
March 7, 2002 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spreading out of Africa like starlings, early humans conquered the world by embracing the strangers they encountered around the globe, not by forcing them into extinction, as many researchers believed, according to a new analysis of human genetic history. In the textbook view, the founding fathers of modern humanity emerged suddenly from Africa about 100,000 years ago and swept into oblivion all other prehuman species--Neanderthals, for example--that they encountered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind the colonial church where her father was baptized nearly a century ago, Teresa Maldonado Parker on Tuesday celebrated her first Mexican Christmas. Under streams of colorful banners on Auza Street in this small agricultural community, dozens of neighborhood children and distant cousins lit candles and sparklers and rocked baby Jesus in blankets on Christmas Eve. They shared sweets and punch. There were no gifts, no trees, no Santa Claus.
NEWS
December 20, 2001 | Dave Wilson
Ask Doris Dell of Woodland Hills what she can't live without and she answers without hesitation: "I'm retired, and the Internet is my whole life." Dell's hobby is genealogy and she uses the Net to help track down family trees. But it's not just a hobby for her. For Dell, and many others, the Internet is a connection to humanity, a way of reaching out to people who would otherwise be inaccessible. "The contacts I've made on the Internet have become very important to me.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
Two centuries after the Lewis and Clark expedition trekked through the unexplored West to Oregon, a group is looking for the descendants they left behind. They could number in the thousands today, but the Lewis & Clark Corps of Discovery Descendant Project wants to publish a genealogical catalog of every descendant of the 34 members of the famed expedition, including descendants of brothers, sisters and even cousins of expedition members. The deadline: Dec.
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