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Genealogy

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2002 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most days, researchers camped out in Laguna Niguel's National Archives reference room chitchat about the past as they untangle the threads of family history. In recent weeks, though, the talk has been about the future--today, to be precise, when archivists believe the unsealing of 72-year-old census will set off a mad scramble of genealogists hungry for what one called "the first fresh meat" in a decade.
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NEWS
March 7, 2002 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spreading out of Africa like starlings, early humans conquered the world by embracing the strangers they encountered around the globe, not by forcing them into extinction, as many researchers believed, according to a new analysis of human genetic history. In the textbook view, the founding fathers of modern humanity emerged suddenly from Africa about 100,000 years ago and swept into oblivion all other prehuman species--Neanderthals, for example--that they encountered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind the colonial church where her father was baptized nearly a century ago, Teresa Maldonado Parker on Tuesday celebrated her first Mexican Christmas. Under streams of colorful banners on Auza Street in this small agricultural community, dozens of neighborhood children and distant cousins lit candles and sparklers and rocked baby Jesus in blankets on Christmas Eve. They shared sweets and punch. There were no gifts, no trees, no Santa Claus.
NEWS
December 20, 2001 | Dave Wilson
Ask Doris Dell of Woodland Hills what she can't live without and she answers without hesitation: "I'm retired, and the Internet is my whole life." Dell's hobby is genealogy and she uses the Net to help track down family trees. But it's not just a hobby for her. For Dell, and many others, the Internet is a connection to humanity, a way of reaching out to people who would otherwise be inaccessible. "The contacts I've made on the Internet have become very important to me.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
Two centuries after the Lewis and Clark expedition trekked through the unexplored West to Oregon, a group is looking for the descendants they left behind. They could number in the thousands today, but the Lewis & Clark Corps of Discovery Descendant Project wants to publish a genealogical catalog of every descendant of the 34 members of the famed expedition, including descendants of brothers, sisters and even cousins of expedition members. The deadline: Dec.
NEWS
August 28, 2001 | LAURA SESSIONS STEPP, THE WASHINGTON POST
With an archivist for a mother, Emily Reid has grown up immersed in other people's histories. She traipsed through cemeteries at 3, and learned to look up other people's birth and death certificates on microfilm as soon as she could read. It wasn't until she came across the name William Fuqua, though, that history came alive for her. Assigned as a high school freshman to research her family tree, Emily discovered that she was related to Fuqua, a French Huguenot farmer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two tablespoons of blood drawn from each of 100,000 volunteers will soon help Brigham Young University researchers create a DNA database and trace family trees back 15 generations. Officials with the high-tech genealogy project have traveled to Southern California several times during the last year to collect blood from locals who can trace their family histories back at least four generations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With two tablespoons of blood drawn from each of 100,000 volunteers worldwide, Brigham Young University researchers hope to create a DNA database that will use genetic markers to help reconstruct family trees going back 15 generations. Officials with the high-tech genealogy project have traveled to Southern California a few times over the last year to collect blood from people who can trace their family histories back at least four generations.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | FRANCES KERRY, REUTERS
From marriage and dowry records to cargo inventories and sales of slaves, the daily details of centuries of Spanish colonial rule in Cuba lie buried amid millions of pages of aging legal documents in its National Archives. Now, in a sign that hostile political relations between Washington and Havana do not have to get in the way of academic zeal, Cuban and U.S.
NEWS
May 28, 2001 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long before there was the census in China, there were the genealogy records. Every family had one, from the emperor to the poorest peasant. Like time capsules, these private archives captured vital statistics about the life and times of a family's ancestors. After the Communists took over in 1949, tens of thousands of these family dossiers were destroyed as vestiges of a backward-looking feudal society. Now China's most modern city is racing to rescue what's left of these ancient manuscripts.
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