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Genentech Inc

BUSINESS
May 3, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Swiss firm Roche Holding and partners Genentech Inc. of South San Francisco and OSI Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Melville, N.Y., have asked U.S. regulators to approve the lung cancer drug Tarceva to treat pancreatic cancer. The three companies submitted an application to the Food and Drug Administration for the new use after a study showed that the drug helped patients live longer when taken with chemotherapy, Roche said.
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BUSINESS
December 4, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
The Food and Drug Administration will ask outside experts Wednesday whether Genentech Inc.'s Avastin should be approved to treat breast cancer, despite mixed results in company studies. After reviewing the South San Francisco firm's data, the agency said patients on Avastin and chemotherapy had slower cancer progression but did not survive longer overall than patients on chemotherapy alone. Shares of Genentech fell $2.75, or 3.6%, to $73.50.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2007 | From Reuters
Genentech Inc. and Biogen Idec Inc. said their Rituxan cancer drug proved highly effective against multiple sclerosis in a small mid-stage trial, signaling a potential new way of treating the progressive neurological disease. The biotechnology companies said the Phase II trial involved 104 patients with the most common "relapsing-remitting" form of multiple sclerosis -- in which patients have varying levels of recovery and periods of remission between flare-ups of the autoimmune disease.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Genentech Inc. said that Mark Richmond would resign Oct. 31 from its board of directors and that energy executive Debra L. Reed became a member this week. Richmond, 74, a senior research fellow in science policy at the University College of London, has been a Genentech director since 1999. Reed is chief operating offer of Sempra Energy's San Diego Gas & Electric Co. and Southern California Gas Co.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2004 | Denise Gellene
Genentech Inc. has licensed antibody technology from Xencor Inc., a small biotechnology company in Monrovia, to develop next-generation versions of Genentech's cancer drugs Rituxan and Herceptin. Genentech, based in South San Francisco, will pay Xencor a $5-million fee and annual licensing fees. The smaller company is eligible for undisclosed milestone payments and royalties. Xencor is a Caltech spinoff working on drugs for rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Insmed Inc. infringed three patents covering a treatment for abnormally short children, a jury said in a lawsuit brought by Genentech Inc. and Tercica Inc. The jury in federal court in Oakland awarded San Francisco-based Genentech and Brisbane, Calif.-based Tercica $7.5 million in damages and a percentage of future sales of the treatment. Richmond, Va.-based Insmed's Iplex and Tercica's product, called Increlex, are growth drugs used to treat about 6,000 short children.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1995 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Biotechnology pioneer Genentech Inc., in an embarrassing disclosure that stunned the industry, said Monday that it had ousted Chief Executive G. Kirk Raab after he sought a $2-million personal loan guarantee from the company's largest shareholder, Swiss-based Roche Holdings. Genentech, one of the world's premier biotechnology firms, quickly named Arthur D. Levinson, a low-profile but highly regarded scientist and senior vice president, to succeed Raab as chairman and CEO.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Genentech Inc. agreed to pay as much as $605 million to Inotek Pharmaceuticals Corp. for rights to experimental cancer and heart drugs designed to help repair DNA. Closely held Inotek, based in Beverly, Mass., will receive $20 million upfront and as much as $405 million in additional payments for rights to the compound INO-1001 and related drugs, Genentech said. Genentech also obtained an option worth as much as $200 million for using the treatment on heart conditions.
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