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NEWS
June 17, 2000 | From the Washington Post
A new report to Congress warns that the Clinton administration's plan for a national missile defense system is based on uncertain assessments of the potential threats and is vulnerable to delays and escalating costs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2000 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. General Accounting Office will investigate allegations that INS agents working to combat street gangs were guilty of collusion with Los Angeles Police Department officers involved in the Rampart Division scandal, congressional spokesmen said Thursday. A GAO spokesman, however, offered few details on the probe's focus. He said it would address issues raised by Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Los Angeles).
BUSINESS
March 11, 2000 |
The Defense Department should delay selection of a prime contractor for its Joint Strike Fighter program because neither of the two candidates, Lockheed Martin Corp. and Boeing Co., is making sufficient progress, according to a draft congressional audit. The 29-page report, obtained by Bloomberg News, is the first independent review of the JSF project, the largest jet fighter program in U.S. history.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1999 | LIZ PULLIAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allegations of taxpayer abuse--particularly involving the rich and famous--have prompted an Illinois congressman to call for a federal investigation of state tax agencies, including the California Franchise Tax Board. Rep. Jerry Weller (R-Ill.), in a letter to the General Accounting Office, cited an Aug. 2 story in The Times about the FTB's tough collection tactics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1999 | GREG KRIKORIAN and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal inquiry into alleged fraud within Los Angeles County's child support program consisted of just two phone calls--one of them to the head of the program, according to a General Accounting Office memo. Further, the GAO said the Department of Health and Human Services' office of inspector general did not interview any of more than a dozen people who a confidential informant claimed had firsthand knowledge of wrongdoing within the child support program in the office of Dist. Atty.
NEWS
August 14, 1999 | LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Reinventing government" is linked so closely to Vice President Al Gore that he often jokes its nickname, REGO, is "Gore spelled sideways." But a new report by the General Accounting Office obtained by The Times turns Gore's sweeping claims of transforming government upside-down. Although Gore says that the program has "saved the American people over $137 billion," the GAO report concludes that the National Partnership for Reinventing Government claims credit where credit is not due. Rep.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Army's theater missile-defense system, despite a first successful flight test last month, still faces serious technical problems because of its reliance on parts that may be faulty, according to a new government report. The General Accounting Office report says the Pentagon took important strides last year in reorganizing the $3.8-billion program, a forerunner to a larger program aimed at shielding the entire nation from a missile attack.
NEWS
June 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
Citing inadequate records, congressional auditors said they were unable to substantiate claims made in high-profile Senate hearings of IRS misconduct, including retaliation against employee whistle-blowers and taxpayers viewed as uncooperative. The Republican senator who chaired last year's Finance Committee hearings, William V. Roth Jr.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Flaws in the development of the newest version of the FA-18 E/F Super Hornet fighter could jeopardize an $8.8-billion Boeing Co. contract to continue early production of the jet, according to a congressional report. The General Accounting Office, the audit arm of Congress, said it identified 84 deficiencies in the FA-18 E/F Super Hornet, the latest version of Boeing's most important military aircraft program.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
The Nasdaq Stock Market is doing a better job of checking out listing applicants and making sure listed companies comply with its standards, according to Congress' General Accounting Office. The GAO report, released Thursday, said Nasdaq's Listing Qualifications Department has initiated at least 85 investigations that have resulted in companies restating their financial information, making corrective public disclosures and, in some cases, being delisted.
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