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General Accounting Office

BUSINESS
December 21, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
A congressional study released Wednesday found that the purchase of US Airways Inc. by UAL Corp.'s United Airlines would stifle competition, adding weight to perceptions that the deal must be changed if the companies hope to win antitrust approval. The merged airline would carry 25% of the nation's passengers and would earn $9 billion a year more than its nearest competitor, according to the report by the General Accounting Office.
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HEALTH
December 18, 2000 | SANDRA G. BOODMAN, WASHINGTON POST
The National Practitioner Data Bank, the repository off-limits to consumers that includes malpractice payments made by doctors and disciplinary actions filed against them, is flawed by inaccurate and incomplete information, concludes a report released recently by the General Accounting Office.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2000 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Potatoes, onions and other basic commodities hardly seem like risky items for supermarkets to stock. However, growers say they are increasingly being charged tens of thousands of dollars in upfront fees usually reserved for food manufacturers introducing unfamiliar products such as a new flavor of ketchup or variety of potato chip. Growers, regulators and others will gather today in a U.S.
NEWS
July 13, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
The federal government has lost millions of dollars from land exchanges, often buying land for more than it is worth and giving up land for less than its market value, congressional auditors reported Wednesday. The General Accounting Office, the investigative arm of Congress, recommended that lawmakers halt land exchanges by the government's two principal land agencies--the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service--because the swaps often do not serve the public interest. Rep.
NEWS
June 17, 2000 | From the Washington Post
A new report to Congress warns that the Clinton administration's plan for a national missile defense system is based on uncertain assessments of the potential threats and is vulnerable to delays and escalating costs.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
So the good news about contract bundling is that small businesses still appear to be getting a sizable share of federal government contracts. The bad news is there is little hard data available as to how much bundling is going on across all federal agencies. Those are the findings of a just-released audit by the General Accounting Office, which attempted to document the affect of contract bundling on the nation's small businesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2000 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. General Accounting Office will investigate allegations that INS agents working to combat street gangs were guilty of collusion with Los Angeles Police Department officers involved in the Rampart Division scandal, congressional spokesmen said Thursday. A GAO spokesman, however, offered few details on the probe's focus. He said it would address issues raised by Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Los Angeles).
BUSINESS
March 11, 2000 |
The Defense Department should delay selection of a prime contractor for its Joint Strike Fighter program because neither of the two candidates, Lockheed Martin Corp. and Boeing Co., is making sufficient progress, according to a draft congressional audit. The 29-page report, obtained by Bloomberg News, is the first independent review of the JSF project, the largest jet fighter program in U.S. history.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1999 | LIZ PULLIAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allegations of taxpayer abuse--particularly involving the rich and famous--have prompted an Illinois congressman to call for a federal investigation of state tax agencies, including the California Franchise Tax Board. Rep. Jerry Weller (R-Ill.), in a letter to the General Accounting Office, cited an Aug. 2 story in The Times about the FTB's tough collection tactics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1999 | GREG KRIKORIAN and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal inquiry into alleged fraud within Los Angeles County's child support program consisted of just two phone calls--one of them to the head of the program, according to a General Accounting Office memo. Further, the GAO said the Department of Health and Human Services' office of inspector general did not interview any of more than a dozen people who a confidential informant claimed had firsthand knowledge of wrongdoing within the child support program in the office of Dist. Atty.
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