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General Agreement On Tariffs And Trade

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BUSINESS
February 11, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Salvador Villar came to Southern California from Mexico in 1981 to head the U.S. ventures of Banco Nacional de Mexico, or Banamex, which was confidently expanding at a time when Mexico was flush with oil wealth. Then the bottom dropped out. Oil prices fell, Mexico went into a severe downturn, banks were nationalized. But Villar stayed north of the border, running Los Angeles' California Commerce Bank as a Banamex subsidiary.
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BUSINESS
August 9, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NAFTA Criticized: The North American Free Trade Agreement violates international trade rules and will discriminate against non-members, said Japan's Study Group on Economic and Trade Policy in the Asia-Pacific Region. Of concern is an increase in the required locally produced content of cars to 62.5% from the current 50% and NAFTA's safeguard measures on compensation duties and against dumping.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The small inventors who dreamed up everything from supermarket scanners to Kitty Litter are making a new discovery here in the nation's capital: Lobbying the federal government can be just as frustrating as building a cutting-edge contraption out in the garage. The inventors' attempt to change U.S. patent law has prompted an ugly intra-party battle between Rep. Carlos J. Moorhead (R-Glendale), who is chairman of the key subcommittee handling patents, and Rep.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
GATT Ratified Amid Protests: The Senate ratified the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, handing another victory to President Fidel Ramos in his quest to open up the economy. Ending months of acrimonious debate, the 23-member body approved the accord as about 2,000 people staged protests outside the Senate building in Manila. Opponents warned that farmers and industries are not yet ready to meet the heightened competition coming from a flood of imports.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
European Parliament Approves GATT Agreement: The legislative body passed the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade by a large majority, clearing the way for final ratification of the accord by the European Union. The Parliament "gives its assent to the conclusion of the results of the Uruguay Round," it said in a resolution adopted by 325 votes in favor, 62 against and 12 abstentions.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
GATT Grants Observer Status: The world trade watchdog has granted observer status to Vietnam in a signal of recognition of the advances the once rigidly communist state has made toward an open economy. A spokesman said the Vietnamese application, presented to a meeting of the ruling council of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, was widely welcomed by delegations from the organization's 123 member countries, which includes the United States.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Canada to Change Rules on Beer Imports: Stores owned or regulated by Canadian provinces will treat imported beer the same as Canadian brands within three years after complaints from U.S. breweries, the government announced. Trade Minister Michael Wilson said the change will comply with a recent international trade ruling against provincial price and distribution regulations, which have made it tough for imported beer to get a foothold in the Canadian market. U.S.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1995 | From Associated Press
Nearly 100 brand-name drugs lost their chance at an extra few years' monopoly in the market Wednesday under a ruling by the U.S. Patent and Trade Office. At issue is whether the drugs could get two patent extensions, one from a 1984 law and another under a global trade agreement provision that takes effect today. The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade extends patent protection to 20 years from the date drug makers file for a patent.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1995 | JENNIFER CORBETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Virginia Click was breathing heavily as she carted two white plastic bins the size of milk crates from her car into the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office here Wednesday afternoon. "It's normally nothing like this," said Click, who works for an Alexandria, Va., law firm that prepares applications for clients ranging from small inventors to big businesses. But as was apparent from the hundreds of patent applications in her two bins, this is not a normal week at the patent office.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1995 | From Associated Press
In a costly setback for makers of generic drugs, the Food and Drug Administration ruled Thursday that certain brand-name drugs can keep their monopoly in the market for up to three extra years. The agency said it was forced into the decision because of a new global trade agreement and the way Congress chose to implement it. The lawmakers may have been unaware of how implementation of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade would affect competition in the prescription drug market.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1995 | From Associated Press
A senator asserted Thursday that Americans could wind up paying $6 billion more for their medicines than they otherwise might because of a provision in the new world trade agreement that extends the patents of brand-name drugs. Pharmaceutical giants are battling consumer groups and generic competitors before the Food and Drug Administration to determine whether they'll be able to pocket the difference.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Central Bank Says Finance Sector to Open: China will open its financial industry to foreign bankers despite failing to secure entry to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, the officials said. Their comments, reported in the official China Daily, came just days after China vowed to renege on all its market-opening commitments if it couldn't gain admission to GATT before the end of this year.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
GATT Ratified Amid Protests: The Senate ratified the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, handing another victory to President Fidel Ramos in his quest to open up the economy. Ending months of acrimonious debate, the 23-member body approved the accord as about 2,000 people staged protests outside the Senate building in Manila. Opponents warned that farmers and industries are not yet ready to meet the heightened competition coming from a flood of imports.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
European Parliament Approves GATT Agreement: The legislative body passed the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade by a large majority, clearing the way for final ratification of the accord by the European Union. The Parliament "gives its assent to the conclusion of the results of the Uruguay Round," it said in a resolution adopted by 325 votes in favor, 62 against and 12 abstentions.
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