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General Agreement On Tariffs And Trade

NEWS
October 5, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration was thrown into a scramble Tuesday, one day before the scheduled vote on a global trade agreement in the House, after the pact's opponents and even some of its key supporters tried to delay the vote until after the November elections. By the close of the day, however, the House leadership decided it had sufficient support to conduct the vote today.
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NEWS
September 30, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abandoning an effort to win speedy approval of a new world trade agreement, the White House and its Senate allies agreed Thursday to delay a vote on the pact until Dec. 1, forcing the Senate into an extraordinary post-election session, White House and Senate sources said. As a result, Sen. Ernest F. Hollings (D-S.C.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plunging into a crucial, and perhaps climactic, period in its effort to retool the nation's trade relations, the White House sent Congress legislation Tuesday to implement a new world trade accord and, hours later, began a final round of negotiations to calm a roiling dispute with Japan.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1994 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pressing to win approval of a global trade pact and to avoid a damaging showdown with Congress, the Clinton Administration signaled Sunday that it is willing to hold back a legislative provision it had sought for negotiating future trade deals. The new GATT accord--which would establish a World Trade Organization to govern global commerce--was completed in Geneva last December after seven years of negotiations.
NEWS
September 10, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With time running short on the congressional calendar, the White House finds itself suddenly struggling to win passage of a once-lauded global trade agreement against unexpected opposition and ever-worsening odds. Legislation that would massively overhaul the world's trading regulations and slash tariffs by an average of 40% is sitting in a bubbling pot of politically risky issues facing Congress when it returns next week.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An eclectic, incongruous coalition of liberals and conservatives urged President Clinton on Monday to put off until next year final congressional consideration of the new world trade treaty negotiated by more than 100 nations last December. In a letter to Clinton, critics ranging from consumer advocate Ralph Nader and California state Sen.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort almost lost in the roiling debate over health care reform, the Clinton Administration is beginning a final concerted push to win approval of U.S. participation in a massive global trade agreement, optimistic that it will be able to nail down its second major political victory on the trade front--and one that eluded the two previous Administrations.
MAGAZINE
July 10, 1994 | Sandy Tolan, Sandy Tolan, based in Gloucester, Mass., writes on trade and the environment. He is executive producer of "Searching for Solutions," a documentary series on population and sustainable development to be broadcast on National Public Radio
The raid was planned well in advance, the target selected with precision, the goal immense. The farmers would wear green scarves and loose fitting khadi--traditional homespun cotton--that evoked the spinning wheel Gandhi had chosen as the symbol of India's self-reliance. Like Gandhi, the farmers would move against an unwelcome foreigner, echoing the Mahatma's campaign against British imperialism.
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