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General Atomics Aeronautical Systems

BUSINESS
September 9, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
It wasn't long after the World Trade Center twin towers fell that U.S. Army special forces units were dispatched to the desolate outcroppings of Afghanistan to stalk and eradicate the Taliban. The commandos were outfitted with radios, night vision goggles and automatic rifles. But a select few carried a new high-tech tool to hunt down the enemy. It was a tiny robotic spy plane, so small it would fit in a backpack. Soldiers would throw the drone into the sky, where it would fly up to 400 feet, shoot video of what's ahead and transmit those images back to the soldiers.
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BUSINESS
July 1, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Despite concerns about U.S.-made drones ending up in enemy hands, American military contractors are lobbying the government to loosen export restrictions and open up foreign markets to the unmanned aircraft that have reshaped modern warfare. Companies such as Northrop Grumman Corp.and other arms makers are eager to tap a growing foreign appetite for high-tech - and relatively cheap - drones, already being sold on the world market by countries such as Israel and China. "Export restrictions are hurting this industry in America without making us any safer," Wesley G. Bush, Northrop's chief executive, said at a defense conference this year.
NEWS
December 2, 1995 | JAMES RISEN and RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With 20,000 U.S. troops poised to enter Bosnia on a potentially bloody peacekeeping mission, the CIA and the Pentagon had hoped to rely to an unprecedented degree on unmanned spy aircraft to provide GIs with vital intelligence as they slog across the steep hills and cloud-covered valleys of the Balkans.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2003 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
San Diego got pounded during the early-1990s recession. But the hammering lately is the sound of new construction. While the state and national economies stagnate, California's second-largest city is experiencing a residential renaissance. Developers have completed more than 2,000 condos, lofts and apartments downtown over the last three years and are planning 9,000 more in the next five years.
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | WILLIAM M. ARKIN, TIMES SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
In Afghanistan, unmanned aircraft have come as close to being war heroes as machines can get. They are providing invaluable reconnaissance, damage assessment and other intelligence information. Some have even hit enemy targets. All at zero risk to American pilots. Despite their increasing acceptance by a once-skeptical military, however, unmanned aircraft will be hard to find when the Pentagon unveils its new budget Monday.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2002 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush has been able to tune in video images of Taliban targets in Afghanistan from the safety and comfort of the White House, giving the commander in chief a powerful capability. The top-secret television feed from the war zone is forwarded via military satellites from the Predator, a remotely controlled spy plane built by a relatively obscure San Diego aerospace firm.
WORLD
September 12, 2008 | Greg Miller and Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writers
As part of an escalating offensive against extremist targets in Pakistan, the United States is deploying Predator aircraft equipped with sophisticated new surveillance systems that were instrumental in crippling the insurgency in Iraq, according to U.S. military and intelligence officials. The use of the specially equipped drones comes amid a fundamental shift in U.S. strategy in the area. After years of deferring to Pakistani authorities, the Bush administration is turning toward unilateral American military operations -- a gambit that could increase pressure on Islamic militants but risks alienating a country that has been a key counter-terrorism ally.
NEWS
October 3, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before terrorists attacked on Sept. 11, the Pentagon and the defense industry were gearing up for a new kind of warfare taking shape in Afghanistan and elsewhere, designing spy equipment and weapons that could pinpoint moving targets and knock them out in minutes.
WORLD
January 29, 2006 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
Despite protests from other countries, the United States is expanding a top-secret effort to kill suspected terrorists with drone-fired missiles as it pursues an increasingly decentralized Al Qaeda, U.S. officials say. The CIA's failed Jan. 13 attempt to assassinate Al Qaeda second-in-command Ayman Zawahiri in Pakistan was the latest strike in the "targeted killing" program, a highly classified initiative that officials say has broadened as the network splintered and fled Afghanistan.
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