Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGeneral Atomics Company
IN THE NEWS

General Atomics Company

FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 19, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In desolate Siberia, Russia's Tomsk-7 nuclear complex sits atop a mountain of plutonium. Its 20,000 workers operate weapons reactors not to fight the cold war, but to provide steam heat to nearby residents. Under an agreement signed with the United States last year, Russia vowed to shut the reactors by 2000. But how to accomplish this lofty goal has created an unusual dispute with an unusual cast of characters.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON
SECURITY: A massive study of security at the U.S. Department of Energy's laboratories and weapons complexes produced 300 recommendations for improvements but concluded that there are no "bleeding wounds" endangering national security. One of the chief findings was not one of laxity, but of an overly cumbersome clearance process. Employees from one laboratory are unable to gain access routinely to identical facilities at another site.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Diego firm has signed a joint venture agreement with Russia's Ministry of Atomic Energy to develop an advanced nuclear reactor in Russia that would burn weapons-grade plutonium to produce electricity, the firm announced Friday. The agreement by General Atomics creates the first joint venture by a U.S. company and Russia to find a private-sector solution to Russia's plutonium oversupply problem.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Diego firm has signed a joint venture agreement with Russia's Ministry of Atomic Energy to develop an advanced nuclear reactor in Russia that would burn weapons-grade plutonium to produce electricity, the firm announced Friday. The agreement by General Atomics creates the first joint venture by a U.S. company and Russia to find a private-sector solution to Russia's plutonium oversupply problem.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In desolate Siberia, Russia's Tomsk-7 nuclear complex sits atop a mountain of plutonium. Its 20,000 workers operate weapons reactors not to fight the cold war, but to provide steam heat to nearby residents. Under an agreement signed with the United States last year, Russia vowed to shut the reactors by 2000. But how to accomplish this lofty goal has created an unusual dispute with an unusual cast of characters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2009 | Richard Simon
Despite President Obama's pledge to crack down on pork-barrel spending, California House members are not shying away from seeking money for pet projects. In the fiscal 2010 spending bills, they are asking for earmarks big and small -- from $10 million to buy 665 acres in Malibu (for the largest addition to the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area in more than 15 years) to $250,000 for repairs to Hollywood's Walk of Fame.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON
SECURITY: A massive study of security at the U.S. Department of Energy's laboratories and weapons complexes produced 300 recommendations for improvements but concluded that there are no "bleeding wounds" endangering national security. One of the chief findings was not one of laxity, but of an overly cumbersome clearance process. Employees from one laboratory are unable to gain access routinely to identical facilities at another site.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|