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NEWS
April 16, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
The first Gallup poll of the general election campaign shows Mitt Romney edging out President Obama, a close result that both parties expect will be the case through much of the next seven months. The former Massachusetts governor, emerging from a difficult and longer-than-expected Republican nomination battle, has the support of 47% of registered voters nationwide, while the president has the support of 45%. Two percent of voters said they supported another candidate, while 7% were undecided.
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NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
A Green Party candidate for secretary of state is planning to crash a debate Wednesday in Sacramento, after he and two other contenders were excluded from the event. This is oddly amusing for a couple of reasons. First, when has there ever been so much interest in the race for secretary of state? It's a job that largely involves overseeing election procedures and managing various business and political filings. Second, David Curtis, the Green Party candidate who was not invited to the debate, recently placed higher in a Field Poll voter survey than two other candidates who were invited to debate.
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NEWS
January 16, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
The two men are unlikely to mix it up in earnest for weeks. But the core argument in a potential Mitt Romney-Barack Obama general election matchup played out one tweet at a time in a virtual clash between their advisors Monday. David Axelrod, senior campaign advisor for the Democratic president, and Eric Fehrnstrom, a top aide for the front-running Republican, exchanged a series of arguments on the economy for the better part of three hours in what was something of an undercard battle before another televised Republican candidates debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Seema Mehta and Jean Merl
When California voters decided to change the way the state's primary elections work, the move was cast as an effort to moderate a state Capitol gripped by polarization. If the top two vote-getters in a primary faced off against one another in November regardless of their party affiliation, the reasoning went, hard-nosed politicians who typically put party purity above all else would be forced to court less partisan voters. That could mean more centrists elected to office, more political compromise and better governance.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli and Kathleen Hennessey
CHICAGO -- The morning after Rick Santorum ended his bid for the Republican Party's presidential nomination, Mitt Romney was quick to herald the start of the general election. But at the Obama campaign's sprawling headquarters in Chicago, it was just another Wednesday. Sure, there was the morning release of a Web video highlighting many of Romney's statements tailored to the conservative voters he needed in primaries and caucuses. And the rapid response operation sprung to action when the Republican's campaign seemed to be caught flat-footed by a question about the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act. But there was no need for a "flip of the switch" as the GOP campaign ended, because the Obama operation had already been long-engaged in the fight.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By David Lauter
With both Barack Obama and Mitt Romney increasingly focused on their all-but-certain contest, now is a good time to look at their relative standing in head-to-head polls - a baseline for the race to come. Until mid-spring of the election year, a president's approval rating historically has provided a better gauge of his re-election prospects than horse-race polls. That starts to change around this point in the year, when polls matching the two candidates begin to have some reliability at forecasting the race, according to data compiled by the Gallup organization.
NEWS
April 3, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- President Obama branded the House Republican budget "a prescription for decline" Tuesday and used it as a proxy to frame his general election confrontation with Mitt Romney, just as the GOP frontrunner appeared poised to tighten his grip on the party's nomination. "It's a Trojan Horse. Disguised as deficit reduction plan, it's really an attempt to impose a radical vision on our country. It's nothing but thinly-veiled Social Darwinism," the president said in a speech at the Associated Press luncheon in Washington.
WORLD
July 5, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Macedonia set Sept. 15 as the date for a general election politicians hope will crown the peace process begun after last year's ethnic conflict. Parliamentary Speaker Stojan Andov, announcing the date, said he hoped the election would be fair and democratic and "conclude the crisis and open a new era."
NEWS
January 3, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong's party won all but two seats in the island nation's general election. The ruling People's Action Party, or PAP, won the election before the votes were cast when opposition parties decided to contest only 36 of Parliament's 83 seats. They had held four seats in the old assembly. Goh, who waged a fierce campaign focused on voters' pockets and sensitive racial issues, was jubilant. "This is a watershed election," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A husband-and-wife team seeking election to a pair of open City Council seats will face two other candidates in the April 10 municipal general election. Carolyn and Phil Berlin finished third and fourth, respectively, in a seven-person field in this week's primary election. The top vote-getters were Gary Bric and Anja Reinke. The married couple's campaign sparked controversy when critics contended that the Berlins would align themselves with a current council member and vote as a bloc.
WORLD
September 18, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Mark Magnier
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Two Taliban gunmen on a motorcycle issued a cheery morning greeting Wednesday to Amanullah Aman, head of the Independent Election Commission in Kunduz province, then opened fire and killed him, raising fears of protracted violence in the run-up to next year's Afghan general election. “Aman was shot with three bullets in the chest,” said Enayatullah Khaliq, spokesman for the governor of Kunduz. “He was taken to the hospital, where he died an hour later.” The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack in a telephone call from spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid.
WORLD
June 30, 2013 | By Fabiola Gutierrez and Chris Kraul
SANTIAGO, Chile - Marking a triumphant return to politics, former Chilean President Michelle Bachelet won the right to run for another four-year presidential term in November. With 99% of the votes counted in Sunday's primary, the surgeon-turned-politician had an overwhelming 73.1%. Her closest opponent for the nomination of the center-left coalition New Majority was Andres Velasco, with 12.9%. Bachelet, who was president from 2006 to 2010, has remained extremely popular with Chileans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Voter registration by Republicans in this state continues to slide, but a smaller percentage of Californians are also registered as Democrats this year. Republican voter registration dipped from 2011 to 2012 from 30.88% to 29.4%, but the new report by the secretary of state says GOP registration was at 28.94% as of Feb. 10. Democrats make up 43.93% of registered voters in California as of February, down slightly from 44.04% in February 2011, the last non-election year. More than 259,000 voters have switched their registration to "no party preference" since 2011, according to Secretary of State Debra Bowen.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
The two candidates who earned a spot in the runoff to be Los Angeles' next mayor have little time to savor their victory. Wendy Greuel and Eric Garcetti must immediately start raising money , because unlike in state and federal elections, they were prohibited for raising money for the general election during the primary. And they weren't allowed to reserve any of the millions of dollars they raised in the primary for the runoff, meaning the candidates started raising new funds within hours of the polls closing Tuesday.
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON -- Democratic Sen. Frank Lautenberg of New Jersey, the last of the World War II veterans in the Senate, is retiring at the end of this term, he said Thursday. Lautenberg, who turned 89 last month, had been planning to run for reelection in 2014. This year, however, Cory Booker, the mayor of Newark, indicated interest in the job and began forming a campaign committee to explore the option. Booker is not the only potential candidate, and the prospect of an open Senate seat could set up a scramble among Democrats.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- Republican Sen. Jim DeMint of South Carolina, one of the most influential leaders of the tea party wing of the party, will retire in January to head a conservative think tank in Washington. DeMint has been a renegade on and off Capitol Hill, and earned a reputation for often rousing - and clashing - with his colleagues over his hard-line positions. The two-term senator carried those views to the campaign trail, where his political action committee endorsed right-flank candidates - often against the party's wishes.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By James Rainey
Florida's secretary of state took a grilling Tuesday from lawmakers about why the Sunshine State struggles to provide efficient elections and vote tallies. But officials still seemed to lack the clear resolve to end the state's long polling waits and stagecoach-era ballot tabulation systems a dozen years after disputed Florida voting threw the presidential election into a constitutional crisis. Secretary of State Ken Detzner, who oversees the state's elections, blamed the delays on election supervisors in five mostly urban counties.
OPINION
November 11, 2012 | By John Johnson
LAS VEGAS - It was at a modest house on the outskirts of this gambling mecca last weekend that I finally became confident President Obama would win reelection. As I approached the door, I noticed three young men standing inside, drinking beer in the middle of the afternoon. No point trying to talk a bunch of slackers into voting, I thought. Best to move on. Then, one ambled over. "What's up?" he asked, clearly wondering why a middle-aged white guy was standing on his porch, clipboard in hand.
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