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General Election

NEWS
February 18, 1987 | Associated Press
The Irish voted Tuesday in a general election brought about by record debt and unemployment, with opinion polls forecasting defeat for Prime Minister Garret FitzGerald and his Fine Gael party. But the electorate could leave the favorite, former Prime Minister Charles Haughey, unable to form a government strong enough to jolt the country out of its economic woes. Coalitions or minority governments emerged from three previous elections over the last six years. Polls opened at 9 a.m.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2000 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti appears resigned to the likelihood that he will be forced into a runoff with one of his two challengers in the March 7 primary and is saving the bulk of his substantial campaign war chest for November's general election. Garcetti's campaign has decided not to run any television or radio advertising in the primary, even though he could win a third term outright by receiving more than 50% of the votes Tuesday.
WORLD
June 30, 2013 | By Fabiola Gutierrez and Chris Kraul
SANTIAGO, Chile - Marking a triumphant return to politics, former Chilean President Michelle Bachelet won the right to run for another four-year presidential term in November. With 99% of the votes counted in Sunday's primary, the surgeon-turned-politician had an overwhelming 73.1%. Her closest opponent for the nomination of the center-left coalition New Majority was Andres Velasco, with 12.9%. Bachelet, who was president from 2006 to 2010, has remained extremely popular with Chileans.
OPINION
March 1, 2012 | Doyle McManus
Mitt Romney started as the odds-on favorite for the GOP nomination, and he's never really lost that spot. Still, he's had a rough six weeks. He's been attacked by his Republican rivals as both a heartless capitalist and a closet liberal. He's committed gaffes that make him sound like a caricature of a clueless rich guy. And the Democratic president he wants to replace has surged ahead of him (and all the other GOP challengers) in head-to-head polls. So is it time for Democrats to rejoice?
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | Times editorial researcher Michael Meyers
INTELLIGENCE Debate prep: The previously announced statewide broadcast debate between candidates for governor Dianne Feinstein and Pete Wilson may be just that--broadcast statewide. The California Broadcasters Assn., which is sponsoring the Oct. 7 event, has lined up 27 television stations and 20 radio outlets to carry the proceedings. All but eight plan to air the debate live. Locally, the debate will be seen at 6 p.m. on KNBC-TV, where it is being held.
OPINION
October 24, 2012 | By Keith Smith
When sample ballots started arriving this month, many California voters must have wondered where all the candidates went. Previously it was possible to vote for someone other than a Republican or Democrat; most voters will not have that option this year. Some won't even get to choose between a Republican and Democrat. They'll have to pick between two Democrats or two Republicans. What happened to all the other candidates? Proposition 14 and the California Legislature happened. Neither was good for democracy.
OPINION
April 3, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
It looks as if it's going to be Mitt Romney after all. With Paul Ryan, Marco Rubio and Jeb Bush endorsing the former Massachusetts governor last week, there aren't any white knights left to play the role of GOP savior. But that news hasn't reached his competitors yet. Psychoanalyzing the remaining competitors for why they are staying in the race is probably a fool's errand. Ron Paul has never worked under the assumption he might be the nominee, never mind the next president.
NATIONAL
July 30, 2011 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
Michele Bachmann showed up an hour late to sell herself to voters gathered at the town library the other day. Some had already walked out of the stuffy conference room, peeved at the presidential candidate's tardiness. But those who remained sat enthralled as she illustrated the federal deficit on a whiteboard, writing out a trail of zeros to illustrate the enormity of the nation's debt and delivering a fiery indictment of President Obama. Only after she finished her remarks and was posing for pictures did the Minnesota congresswoman remember her plea: "Don't forget about the straw poll!"
NATIONAL
May 9, 2012 | By Michael Finnegan, Los Angeles Times
After more than 35 years in the Senate, Richard G. Lugarof Indiana was ousted Tuesday by a tea party challenger in a Republican primary that showed how hard it is for a veteran lawmaker known for his ability to compromise to win reelection in the current political environment. The 80-year-old senator, a leading voice for his party on foreign policy, was pummeled for weeks by Republican rival Richard Mourdock for his breaches with conservative orthodoxy. Among them: Lugar's support of citizenship for some illegal immigrants and his votes to confirm President Obama's Supreme Court nominees, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
In a decision that could foreshadow survival of California's new "top two" primary system, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday upheld a similar Washington state ballot initiative that changed the way voters choose candidates in primaries. Both states' voters approved measures allowing the top two vote-getters in a primary to advance to the general election, regardless of party affiliation. The format replaced closed primaries, in which each party chose a candidate for the general election.
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