Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGeneral Motors Hughes Electronics Corp
IN THE NEWS

General Motors Hughes Electronics Corp

FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 15, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
GM-Hughes Unit to Take Over Navy Base: The subsidiary of General Motors' Hughes Electronics Corp. will invest more than $180 million and create at least 700 jobs at the Naval Air Warfare Center in Indianapolis in what officials say is the largest defense privatization in U.S. history. El Segundo-based Hughes Technical Services will also move some of its existing business and work force to Indianapolis as it commercializes the base.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 15, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
GM-Hughes Unit to Take Over Navy Base: The subsidiary of General Motors' Hughes Electronics Corp. will invest more than $180 million and create at least 700 jobs at the Naval Air Warfare Center in Indianapolis in what officials say is the largest defense privatization in U.S. history. El Segundo-based Hughes Technical Services will also move some of its existing business and work force to Indianapolis as it commercializes the base.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While General Motors gushed red ink last year, three subsidiaries that make no cars were profitable. Electronic Data Services, General Motors Acceptance Corp. and GM Hughes Electronics reported combined profit of nearly $2.5 billion. In contrast, GM's North American automotive operations suffered an estimated $7.4-billion loss. The company as a whole lost $4.5 billion in 1991, GM officials said Monday.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1986
General Motors Hughes Electronics Corp., which was created last month following the acquisition of Hughes Aircraft Co. by General Motors, named three new executives. Donald J. Almquist, general manager of GM's Delco Electronics division, was named vice president and general manager of Delco Electronics Corp., a subsidiary that includes GM's principal automotive electronics operations and part of its defense operations. He reports to Delco Electronics President Robert J. Schultz. Also, Harry G.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Satellite-to-Home Broadcasting to Be Offered: Thomson Consumer Electronics, which make RCA and GE televisions, said it will help launch a satellite-to-home TV broadcasting system through a venture with the Hughes Electronics unit of General Motors Corp. Thomson, owned by French electronics concern Thomson SA, will make the satellite receiving dishes, TV set decoders and other technology for the system, which is to begin operating in early 1994.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While General Motors gushed red ink last year, three subsidiaries that make no cars were profitable. Electronic Data Services, General Motors Acceptance Corp. and GM Hughes Electronics reported combined profit of nearly $2.5 billion. In contrast, GM's North American automotive operations suffered an estimated $7.4-billion loss. The company as a whole lost $4.5 billion in 1991, GM officials said Monday.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2002 | Bloomberg News
MEDIA * EchoStar Communications Corp.'s proposed $18.3-billion purchase of General Motors Corp.'s DirecTV would "at best" reduce competitors for subscription television from three competitors to two, the Justice Department's antitrust enforcement chief told a Senate committee. In rural areas not served by cable television, there will be no competition to the merged satellite television provider, Assistant Atty. Gen. Charles A. James testified.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1988 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
Perceptronics has held talks with Ford Aerospace about Ford buying a portion of the Woodland Hills company. "We are interested in forming strategic relationships," said Gershon Weltman, chairman of Perceptronics. "We have been in contact with Ford Aerospace." Susan Pearce, a spokeswoman for Ford Aerospace, refused comment. "As a matter of Ford policy, we do not discuss in any way questions about acquisitions," she said.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1986 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
The motive behind recent cost-cutting moves at Hughes Aircraft was an internal projection that Hughes' profits over a four-year period would fall $532.8 million short of what it had projected when General Motors agreed to buy the company last year, Hughes officials said Thursday.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Satellite-to-Home Broadcasting to Be Offered: Thomson Consumer Electronics, which make RCA and GE televisions, said it will help launch a satellite-to-home TV broadcasting system through a venture with the Hughes Electronics unit of General Motors Corp. Thomson, owned by French electronics concern Thomson SA, will make the satellite receiving dishes, TV set decoders and other technology for the system, which is to begin operating in early 1994.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1986
General Motors Hughes Electronics Corp., which was created last month following the acquisition of Hughes Aircraft Co. by General Motors, named three new executives. Donald J. Almquist, general manager of GM's Delco Electronics division, was named vice president and general manager of Delco Electronics Corp., a subsidiary that includes GM's principal automotive electronics operations and part of its defense operations. He reports to Delco Electronics President Robert J. Schultz. Also, Harry G.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1985 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
General Motors will issue today its long-awaited prospectus for a new class of common stock to acquire Hughes Aircraft, which it agreed to buy for about $5 billion in cash and new securities last June, sources close to the deal said Tuesday. The prospectus is coming out after months of delay, which has taken GM down to the wire in meeting its goal of closing the deal by the end of the year.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Internal Revenue Service has demanded that Hughes Aircraft pay $370 million in back taxes and penalties dating to the mid-1980s, the aerospace company disclosed in appeals it has filed in U.S. Tax Court. The amount is one of the largest known tax deficiencies attributed to an aerospace contractor, although such disputes usually are not disclosed to the public because they are settled before reaching Tax Court, corporate tax experts said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|