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August 15, 1995 | DAVID SEIDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1991, Quay Hays did the ridiculous. He quit his job and started a book company, although he had no publishing experience, few contacts, little financial backing and 3,000 miles between himself and virtually everyone in the business. Today, Hays' Santa Monica-based General Publishing Group has delivered bestsellers such as "Playboy: 40 Years," which has sold more than 200,000 copies at $45 apiece, and "All My Children: The Complete Family Scrapbook," which reached No.
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BOOKS
December 10, 1995 | Mitchell Fink, Mitchell Fink is the Insider columnist for People magazine
A funny thing happens to Nancy Sinatra during her 336-page chronological journey through her father's stunning musical and humanitarian accomplishments: She runs out of pictures. Oh, yes, there are many wonderfully personal, never-before-seen photos of this truly amazing American icon. But most of them, be they of him at work or with his family, very definitely depict the early Frank Sinatra. I imagine a now-middle-aged Nancy in her basement, if she has one, unpacking cartons, sifting through photo albums and then ring-a-ding-dinging up her brother, Frank, sister, Tina, and mother, Nancy, and asking whether it'd be all right if she rummaged through their personal files too. It's around her father's Ava Gardner period that readers will begin to notice a subtle thinning out of Nancy's exclusive and often candid photographic collection and how it is suddenly overtaken by a graphic look that relies far more heavily on stock shots, black-and-white press photos and album artwork.
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BOOKS
December 10, 1995 | Mitchell Fink, Mitchell Fink is the Insider columnist for People magazine
A funny thing happens to Nancy Sinatra during her 336-page chronological journey through her father's stunning musical and humanitarian accomplishments: She runs out of pictures. Oh, yes, there are many wonderfully personal, never-before-seen photos of this truly amazing American icon. But most of them, be they of him at work or with his family, very definitely depict the early Frank Sinatra. I imagine a now-middle-aged Nancy in her basement, if she has one, unpacking cartons, sifting through photo albums and then ring-a-ding-dinging up her brother, Frank, sister, Tina, and mother, Nancy, and asking whether it'd be all right if she rummaged through their personal files too. It's around her father's Ava Gardner period that readers will begin to notice a subtle thinning out of Nancy's exclusive and often candid photographic collection and how it is suddenly overtaken by a graphic look that relies far more heavily on stock shots, black-and-white press photos and album artwork.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1995 | DAVID SEIDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1991, Quay Hays did the ridiculous. He quit his job and started a book company, although he had no publishing experience, few contacts, little financial backing and 3,000 miles between himself and virtually everyone in the business. Today, Hays' Santa Monica-based General Publishing Group has delivered bestsellers such as "Playboy: 40 Years," which has sold more than 200,000 copies at $45 apiece, and "All My Children: The Complete Family Scrapbook," which reached No.
FOOD
August 6, 1997
Philip Collins made his name producing books about the exuberantly designed radios of the 1920s and '30s, of which he was a pioneer collector. His latest book, "Classic Cocktails of the Prohibition Era" (General Publishing Group, $14.95), treats the cocktails of the same bravely sophisticated Art Deco age.
NEWS
June 20, 1997 | D. JAMES ROMERO
It's strange how our culture rolls over waves of sentiment. Immigrants are good. Immigrants are bad. Affirmative action becomes equal opportunity. And political correctness is a bad memory. That last bit is clear as reptile-hunting brothers Todd and Brant von Hoffmann bring us their "Big Damn Book of Sheer Manliness" (General Publishing Group). It is an encyclopedic coffee-table tome of everything from the history of basketball to the last word on "the mud flap girl" (a.k.a. "sitting ladies").
SPORTS
February 26, 1998 | LARRY STEWART
What: "Golf in the Comic Strips," a collection by Howard Ziehm Publisher: General Publishing Group ($29.95) Hal Linden, the actor and entertainer, likes to tell this one: "How can you tell golf is more popular than tennis? Heard any good tennis jokes lately?" Humor has been a part of golf since the sport made its way to this country from Scotland in the 1890s, about the same time the newspaper comic strip was born. The two have been intertwined ever since.
BOOKS
December 24, 1995
I can't tell you how dismayed I am at the review of Nancy Sinatra's book on her father, "Frank Sinatra: An American Legend" (Book Review, Dec. 17). That the Book Review would assign such an important book to a gossip writer is, to me, unfathomable. Mitchell Fink managed to turn the review into a self-serving gossip column, and he spread false and malicious rumors about the relationship between Frank and Nancy, and gave out wrong information about Frank's involvement with the book. He has been set straight by the Sinatras on how inaccurate he was and on the hurt he caused Nancy with his gratuitous personal swipes.
NEWS
October 2, 1995 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The letter arrived in early August. More than 26 years later, Vietnam veteran William D. Hanes of Seattle, Wash., still remembers the pinup he left behind. * Dear Cynthia, I was delighted to receive a personal reply to my letter. . . . I told you of the wonderful effect that your '68 Playboy centerfold had on the morale of us chopper pilots in Vietnam. Although in all truth, you had more than a few of us banging our heads against the wall and muttering, "I've just GOT to get home!". . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT
It was a little difficult to get the 100 or so children at the Buena Park Boys & Girls Club excited about the wide variety of books donated Tuesday to the organization--until some of the characters came to life. Their interest in "100 Greatest Moments in Olympic History," for example, soared when they realized that one of the gold medalists portrayed in the book was standing right in front of them, invited by organizers to spark interest in reading among the youths.
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