Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGenes
IN THE NEWS

Genes

FEATURED ARTICLES
SCIENCE
April 4, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Scientists have uncovered a group of 40 genes that appear to make North America's monarch butterflies fly thousands of miles south each autumn. It is the first time that researchers have homed in on the exact genes driving migratory behavior in any animal. Monarchs are famous for their epic 2,500-mile overland migrations from Canada to Mexico, but what drives them has been a mystery. The findings were reported Tuesday in the British-based journal BMC Biology.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
March 13, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
If you're a student of fat - and who isn't these days? - you know that the FTO gene is the gene thought to be most responsible for some people's inherited propensity to become obese. Well, forget that. A multinational group of geneticists has discovered that, more likely, the real obesity gene is named IRX3, and it is very far from the FTO gene - or would be, if DNA were to be stretched out in linear fashion instead of coiled up like a skein of yarn. In a letter posted Wednesday to the website of the journal Nature, University of Chicago geneticists Scott Smemo and Marcelo A. Nobrega, along with a team of Canadian and Spanish researchers, wrote that geneticists hunting for the obesity gene appear to have fallen into a trap: They assumed that genetic variations they could see have only local effects, and do not affect the workings of far-away genes.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 20, 2010
Smoking a pack (or two) of cigarettes each day is obviously not good for your lungs. But for those who enjoy an occasional smoke, an obvious question is, “How many cigarettes can I smoke before I start to do some damage?” The sobering answer: Zero. That’s the conclusion of a new study from researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College and Cornell University in New York. The researchers recruited 121 healthy volunteers to pee into a cup and submit to a bronchoscopy , a procedure that included removing cells from the lining of the part of the airway that would first come into contact with inhaled smoke.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
The gig: Deryl McKissack, 52, is president and chief executive of McKissack & McKissack, a construction management and design firm with offices in Los Angeles, Washington, Chicago and Baltimore. The firm manages about $15 billion in construction projects. It has 160 employees. "We're managing the construction process, providing inspections, overseeing schedules and budgets," McKissack said. "With program management, you are managing more than just one project. You are managing an entire capital program for a client.
NEWS
August 10, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Intelligence is in the genes, researchers reported Tuesday in the journal Molecular Psychology. The international team, led by Ian Deary of the University of Edinburgh in Scotland and Peter Visscher of the Queensland Institute of Medical Research in Brisbane, Australia, compared the DNA of more than 3,500 people, middle aged and older, who also had taken intelligence tests.  They calculated that more than 40% of the differences in intelligence among...
SCIENCE
January 27, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Blue-eyed people have been living in Europe for at least 7,000 years, scientists have discovered. A man who lived on the Iberian peninsula before Europeans became farmers probably had blue eyes but dark hair and skin, according to scientists who have sequenced his DNA. This surprising combination of eye, hair and skin coloring may have not have been unusual during his lifetime, but it is no longer seen among modern Europeans, the team reported ...
SCIENCE
January 29, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Mating between Neanderthals and the ancestors of Europeans and East Asians gave our forebears important evolutionary advantages but may have created a lot of sterile males, wiping out much of that primitive DNA, new genetic studies suggest.  The comparison of Neanderthal and modern human genomes, published online Wednesday in the journals Nature and Science , identified specific sequences of altered DNA that both Neanderthals and several...
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Why do some children of mean, neglectful or downright toxic parents become rotten human beings themselves, while their siblings thrive cheerfully? And why do certain offspring of loving, attentive parents grow into well-adjusted adulthood while their siblings become sour misanthropes?  In short, why does good parenting only sometimes produce good kids, and bad parenting only sometimes produce bad kids? The answer may lie in the genes. Specifically, the almost-famous 5-HTTLPR serotonin transporter-promoter gene, which governs the activity of the mood chemical serotonin in the brain and essentially comes in three varieties.
SCIENCE
April 16, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Fainting may be in our genes, which may explain why keeling over at the sight of blood tends to run in families, according to researchers in Australia. The researchers located a specific region on chromosome 15 that is thought to be a prime suspect for "vasovagal syncope," a drop in blood pressure followed by loss of consciousness. The study "strengthens the evidence that fainting may be commonly genetic," said neurologist Samuel Berkovic of the University of Melbourne in Victoria, Australia, author of the report published this week in the journal Neurology.
NEWS
November 17, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Smokers who have repeatedly tried to quit and failed over the years probably have genes that make it extra hard to overcome the addiction, the authors of a new study say. Thursday marks the 36th annual Great American Smokeout. To be sure, the dire health consequences of smoking are well-known, and many adults have quit over the past four decades. But some individuals have great difficulty quitting. The new study, by researchers at the University of Colorado, examined adult twins to look for a genetic influence in tobacco addiction.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By David A. Keeps
For those who have always wanted to see David Hasselhoff's house, Lifetime has a series for you. In conjunction with Beverly Hills-based Julien's Auctions, the network will debut "Celebrity Home Raiders" on Thursday at 10 p.m. The premise couldn't be simpler: Stars put personal belongings up for sale, with proceeds going to the charity of their choosing. Here's the twist: While the host, Kit Hoover from "Access Hollywood," gets the celebrities to put a dollar value on their memorabilia, Julien's co-owners Darren Julien and Martin Nolan roam through the residence looking for goodies.
OPINION
February 25, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The manipulation of human genes could lead to profound advances in our ability to cure or prevent terrible diseases. But in some cases, it might also mean introducing genetic material that could be passed from one generation to the next, changing the human gene pool in a manner that could inadvertently harm peoples' health. Such "inheritable" DNA is a hotly debated issue among bioethicists, and one that an advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration will review Tuesday and Wednesday as it considers whether human trials should be allowed for a new therapy that could prevent a rare but devastating inherited disorder.
SCIENCE
January 29, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Mating between Neanderthals and the ancestors of Europeans and East Asians gave our forebears important evolutionary advantages but may have created a lot of sterile males, wiping out much of that primitive DNA, new genetic studies suggest.  The comparison of Neanderthal and modern human genomes, published online Wednesday in the journals Nature and Science , identified specific sequences of altered DNA that both Neanderthals and several...
SCIENCE
January 29, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
The ancestors of most modern humans mated with Neanderthals and made off with important swaths of DNA that helped them adapt to new environments, scientists reported Wednesday. Some of the genes gained from these trysts linger in people of European and East Asian descent, though many others were wiped out by natural selection, according to reports published simultaneously by the journals Nature and Science. The stretches of Neanderthal DNA that remain include genes that altered hair and pigment, as well as others that strengthened the immune system, the scientists wrote.
SCIENCE
January 27, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Blue-eyed people have been living in Europe for at least 7,000 years, scientists have discovered. A man who lived on the Iberian peninsula before Europeans became farmers probably had blue eyes but dark hair and skin, according to scientists who have sequenced his DNA. This surprising combination of eye, hair and skin coloring may have not have been unusual during his lifetime, but it is no longer seen among modern Europeans, the team reported ...
SCIENCE
January 21, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Fish don't have fingers, but they could. That conclusion, drawn by a team of researchers in Switzerland, casts new light on the evolution of four-legged land vertebrates, suggesting that a flick of a switch could have repurposed the bony radials of fins to become the fingers and toes of land-based animals. The DNA programming architecture necessary to create such digits was present in the ancient genome of fish, before the emergence of amphibians, according to the researchers, who published their findings Tuesday in the online journal PLOS Biology.
HEALTH
February 23, 2009 | Jenny Hontz
Govind Armstrong Chef-owner of 8 oz. in West Hollywood and Table 8 Restaurant in Miami Beach, Fla. -- Armstrong, 38, maintains a 155-pound, 5-foot, 11-inch frame without a whole lot of effort. He was "rail thin" as a teenager -- when he was a competitive pole vaulter -- but says his secret to staying skinny is a mix of genetic luck and a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. "I love beef, especially grass-fed beef," he says. "I'll usually have a steak on a plate with a side of vegetables.
SCIENCE
April 15, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
As the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case against Myriad Genetics, scientists who are skeptical of the idea of patenting genes said they were hopeful that the justices would overturn the Utah company's claims. "I was on pins and needles the whole time," said Dr. Wayne Grody, director of the Diagnostic Molecular Pathology Laboratory at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, who was present at the arguments. "But at the end I thought, 'The justices really get it' ... I felt that all of them who spoke weren't comfortable with the idea of patenting a gene.
OPINION
January 19, 2014 | By Luke Glowacki
Do genes make us do it? The idea that human behavior is driven by genes makes many people uncomfortable, and nowhere is the dispute more bitter than when discussing the biological underpinnings of violence. The war of ideas over violence and human nature has raged since the 1600s, when philosopher Thomas Hobbes first speculated that the "natural condition of mankind" was one of violence and conflict. In the 1700s, Jean-Jacques Rousseau saw things differently. Enthralled with accounts of the New World, he argued that civilization, not nature, shaped the human propensity for violence.
SCIENCE
November 11, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Cocaine use may not make you a better dad, but it may make your son a bit more resistant to addiction, says a new study conducted on rats. Compared with the pups of rats who got no cocaine, the male offspring of rats that were allowed to self-administer cocaine for two months behaved very differently under the influence of the drug. When they got repeated doses of cocaine, rats sired by undrugged fathers responded with an escalating frenzy of movement - in rats, a sign of incipient addiction.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|