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Genes

NEWS
December 1, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major step toward understanding and treating the weight problems that afflict nearly one-third of all Americans, researchers at Rockefeller University in New York announced Wednesday that they have identified and cloned a gene responsible for obesity.
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NEWS
March 24, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
After the longest and most frustrating search in the annals of molecular biology, an international team of researchers has located the defective gene that causes Huntington's disease, a crippling disorder that afflicts about 30,000 Americans. The discovery will immediately make possible cheaper and more accurate tests to identify people who will develop Huntington's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
A team of U.S. and Italian researchers reported last week the discovery of a gene that appears to cause some cancers of the pituitary gland and may also trigger tumor growth in the thyroid, ovary and similar glands. Reporting in the British journal Nature, the researchers said they identified mutations on the "gasp" gene that causes uncontrolled production within a cell of a growth-promoting molecule called cyclic AMP.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Federal researchers have discovered the gene that causes an early-onset form of Parkinson's disease that runs in families, a finding that should provide the first real insight into how the disease develops biochemically. That understanding, in turn, may eventually lead to new treatments for--and perhaps even to ways to delay or prevent the onset of--the devastating disorder, which affects more than 1 million Americans. A team from the National Human Genome Research Institute in Bethesda, Md.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Capping an intensive four-year search, researchers reported today that in studies of the common fruit fly and humans, they have discovered a gene responsible for skin cancer--the most common form of cancer. The discovery could lead to new ways to treat, and maybe even to prevent, skin tumors, researchers said.
NEWS
September 30, 2010
It should surprise no one that height is genetic. For instance, consider that 7-foot-6 NBA star Yao Ming’s parents are 6-foot-7 and 6-foot-3. But for anyone hoping to find the “tall gene” that might give them a few extra inches, researchers have some disheartening news: A comprehensive search for places in the genome that could be associated with height yielded only 180 spots that appear to be associated with height. That might sound like a lot, but the researchers estimate they account for only about 11% of the variability in adult height.
OPINION
November 7, 2010 | By Katherine Ellison
Like many parents of a challenging child, I was quietly thrilled the other day to read that a study in the prestigious medical journal the Lancet reported new evidence that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, my son's main diagnosis, may have something to do with genes. "I'm off the hook!" it's so tempting to think, when hearing this kind of news. Yes, my chromosomes may be to blame, but at least I wouldn't have to keep kicking myself over the possible ramifications of that fall from the swing set when my child was a toddler, or how much pesticide residue he's accumulated in his short time on Earth, or whether my own distractedness has deprived him of the consistency and structure he so obviously needs.
NEWS
January 25, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Scientists have identified another gene that might affect how vulnerable a person is to cigarette addiction. Having a certain form of the gene makes it easier to kick the habit, or perhaps to avoid getting hooked in the first place, two studies suggest. But that apparent influence is modest. "This is just one small piece of the puzzle" of what influences smoking behavior, said psychologist Caryn Lerman, an author of one of the studies. Her work and a follow-up study by Dr.
SCIENCE
December 29, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A gene known to give many Jewish women a high risk of cancer also puts many U.S. Latino women at high risk, U.S. researchers reported this week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. They found that 3.5% of Latinas entered in a Northern California breast cancer registry had the BRCA1 genetic mutation, compared with 8.3% of Ashkenazic Jews and 2.2% of non-Ashkenazic white women.
SCIENCE
June 14, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A gene that triggers flowering in wheat plants has been isolated for the first time, making it possible for scientists to one day develop more productive crops. A team of scientists at UC Davis located the wheat gene that controls vernalization, the process by which cold temperatures prompt some plants to flower.
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