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Genetic Counseling

NEWS
June 26, 1996 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Given a chance to learn if they carried a gene that raised their risk of developing breast, ovarian or prostate cancer, surprisingly few of the 279 women and men in a new study--only 43%--chose to take such a look at the future. That was a central finding of the largest study yet of how people react when offered a blood test for the so-called breast cancer gene, BRCA1, which boosts the likelihood of developing the disease to 87%, about eight times higher than that of women generally.
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NEWS
May 22, 1996 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most couples have a pre-wedding checklist overflowing with tasks to be done before the main event. That list used to include mandatory blood tests to rule out sexually transmitted disease and German measles. Because of a recent change in the law, however, that requirement is passe. But other health tests, along with genetic counseling, are increasingly recommended, depending on the couples' lifestyle, risk factors and their plans to start a family.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To UC Irvine Prof. John J. Wasmuth, it is not speculation. It is a certainty. Three years from now a woman who suspects she is pregnant will go to her physician for tests. The physician will scrape a few cells from the 10-week-old fetus and send them off for genetic analysis. It will be routine; the results will come back in only a few days. The baby will be male. He will not have any of the more common, catastrophic birth defects. So far, so good. He will be prone to colon cancer in midlife.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Eight-year-old David Manikian has a mutant gene--a small bump on his X chromosome that makes him different from other boys. When he was just a toddler, his parents noticed he was slow to learn. The wonders of modern genetic research revealed that David has Fragile X syndrome, a genetic disorder that impairs mental development. But modern genetics was as much a curse as a blessing for this little boy, his parents and three sisters.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1992 | TOM McQUEENEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Beckman Instruments Inc. said Monday that it has been chosen to receive $4.5 million of a $9.2-million grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce to help develop an automated genetic analyzer. Beckman, based in Fullerton, and the seven other companies, universities and laboratories taking part in the five-year research endeavor will match the government's grant. Beckman will contribute $4.5 million to the total $18.4-million research effort, company spokeswoman Elke Eastman said.
MAGAZINE
November 8, 1992 | DANIEL J. KEVELS and LEROY HOOD, Kevles heads Caltech's Science, Ethics and Public Policy program. Hood is a professor of molecular biotechnology at the University of Washington. This excerpt is from "The Code of Codes," a book of essays on the Human Genome Project.
WHAT MAKES US HUMAN INSTEAD OF, SAY, CHIMPANZEES? What are our physical possibilities and our limits as a species? Can we "perfect" our children? And do we want to? Those questions--as much for philosophers as for scientists--have taken on a greater urgency since the late 1980s, when scientists launched the Human Genome Project--a multibillion-dollar effort to obtain the genetic information hidden in every human cell.
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The discovery of a defective gene that apparently causes an inherited form of Alzheimer's disease, announced Thursday, has re-energized the ongoing debate about the ethics of diagnosing such disorders either prenatally or after birth. The majority of researchers and ethicists agree on the importance of diagnosing a disease such as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, which strikes soon after birth and produces a short, brutally painful life.
NEWS
April 16, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
When comedian Gilda Radner died of ovarian cancer in 1989, the tragic story of her illness included these remarkable facts: Radner's aunt, a first cousin and, possibly, her grandmother also had suffered from ovarian cancer. Her overwhelming family history elevated her risk of developing ovarian cancer from one in 70 to one in two. Radner's family history, however, came to light too late to prevent early detection of her own cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A genetic discovery may pave the way for better tests to determine if an unborn baby will inherit a common form of mental retardation, French researchers said last week. They reported in the journal Nature that they have found new genetic features of Fragile X syndrome--the second most common type of inherited mental retardation after Down's syndrome--that may help improve genetic counseling for the disorder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1985 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
It was 4:20 on a recent Wednesday afternoon, and 20-year-old Craig Hawley descended the stairs of his Fullerton home dressed in light-blue running shorts and a striped tank top. Two of the distance runner's coaches were due at the house in a matter of minutes to put Craig through his regular workout, a three- to six-mile run in the Fullerton Hills. Craig flopped on the family room sofa. His mother, Gloria, sat beside him, put his running shoes on his feet and tied them in double knots.
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