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Genetic Information

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2008 | Jason Felch, Times Staff Writer
The National Institutes of Health quietly blocked public access to databases of patient DNA profiles after learning of a study that found the genetic information may not be as anonymous as previously believed, The Times has learned. Institute officials took the unusual step Monday and removed two databases on its public website. The databases contained the genetic information of more than 60,000 cooperating patients. Scientists began posting the information publicly eight months ago to help further medical research.
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HEALTH
April 14, 2008 | Anna Gosline, Special to The Times
My MATERNAL grandmother had Alzheimer's disease. Before she died, she forgot our names, our faces and, eventually, how to speak and think. But my grandfather's heartbreak was the most painful to witness. I remember watching the two of them on the sofa together in the months before she died. My grandfather, a sometimes severe man not overly disposed to expressions of tender emotion, cooed into my grandmother's ear: "My bride, oh my bride. I love you. Do you hear me? I love you."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2007 | Jia-Rui Chong and Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writers
Leslie Orgel, the Salk Institute theoretical chemist who was the father of the RNA world theory of the origin of life and who joined with Nobel laureate Francis Crick to postulate that life might have been seeded on Earth by a higher intelligence, died at the San Diego Hospice & Palliative Care on Oct. 27 from pancreatic cancer. He was 80. Reasoning that DNA was too complex to have been the first repository of genetic information, Orgel and others speculated that RNA could have preceded it, simplifying the evolutionary process.
SCIENCE
October 8, 2002 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most scientists are fortunate to be involved in one major discovery during their lifetime. Sydney Brenner, who received the 2002 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, has been involved in at least three. One, for which he received this year's prize, was the idea to use the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an experimental subject to study the birth and death of cells in living organisms.
NEWS
February 9, 2000 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Tuesday signed an executive order limiting the use of genetic information by federal agencies in hiring and promotion as the availability of such data is exploding. The order prohibits federal agencies from collecting genetic information from their 2.8 million civilian employees or using such information to make hiring, promotion or placement decisions.
OPINION
July 20, 1997
Simple blood tests have been developed in recent years that use genetic markers to identify hereditary leanings toward certain diseases. The tests give valuable early warnings but also are a potential source of discrimination, providing reasons for denial of employment or insurance coverage. Proposed federal legislation would go far toward blocking that threat.
NEWS
March 21, 1997 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prestigious coalition of health experts and ethicists Thursday called for legislation or other measures to protect against abuse of an individual's genetic information in the workplace--for example, using the data to deny jobs, promotions, insurance coverage or other benefits. In recent years, rapidly growing technology and other advances have enabled geneticists to find disease-related genes in human DNA and to develop new tests to detect who carries them.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
UCLA molecular biologist Larry Simpson will report today at a meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science here that he and his colleagues have discovered a new class of molecules that contain genetic information. The new molecules were isolated from a family of parasites, called kinetoplastids, that cause widespread tropical diseases, such as Chagas' disease and sleeping sickness.
NEWS
June 4, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Researchers have discovered an unprecedented and unsuspected deviation from one of the fundamental dogmas of molecular biology: that all genetic information is contained in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and that this information is faithfully copied in the production of proteins and other cellular components. The discovery may trigger a fundamental rethinking of mechanisms by which genetic information is converted into living organisms.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
The first strong proof that psychiatric illnesses can be inherited has emerged from a decade-long study, and the discovery could be a major advance in the detection and treatment of mental illness, scientists are reporting today. In a report published in Nature magazine, a leading British science journal, researchers from three U.S.
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