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Genetic Material

NATIONAL
January 17, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An inmate who spent two decades on death row before DNA evidence exonerated him walked out of prison a free man, saying he just wanted to get home and be with his family. Nicholas Yarris is the first Pennsylvania death row inmate cleared by DNA testing. Yarris' 1983 conviction for rape and murder was overturned last summer when DNA tests proved that genetic material found on the victim belonged to someone else.
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BUSINESS
September 8, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Alnylam Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Isis Pharmaceuticals Inc. have formed a venture uniting Nobel Prize winners David Baltimore and Phillip Sharp to create drugs from a newly discovered class of genetic material. The venture, Regulus Therapeutics, will have exclusive licenses from Alnylam and Isis for technology focused on so-called microRNAs. The molecules regulate networks of genes that may be involved in diseases including cancer, viral infections and metabolic disorders, the companies said.
NEWS
June 1, 1999 | Associated Press
Scientists in Hawaii have cloned a trio of identical mice using ordinary cells rather than DNA extracted from the female reproductive system. This time, the cloned critters were male. The clones grew using genetic material extracted from tail cells of adult male mice, but only one grew to adulthood, according to a study in the June issue of the journal Nature Genetics.
SCIENCE
December 11, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Scientists have identified the cause of Werner syndrome, a rare accelerated aging disease whose sufferers prematurely develop gray hair, wrinkled skin, cataracts, cancer and heart disease, dying in their 40s. Researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla reported in the journal Science that patients with Werner syndrome couldn't properly replicate the ends of their chromosomes due to a defective gene, WRN.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Three decades ago, when so many of his friends were dying of AIDS, Stephen Crohn wondered why he - a gay man whose longtime companion had been one of the first to die from the disease--had managed to avoid it. Was it just a matter of time before he caught the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS? Was there something wrong with the HIV antibody tests he took that always came back negative? Crohn, an artist and freelance editor, lived with the questions for 14 years before he finally learned the answer was in his genes.
NEWS
December 24, 2001
British scientists have mapped chromosome 20, the third and longest chromosome to be sequenced in the Human Genome Project. Chromosome 20 is best known for harboring genes that contribute to forms of the brain-wasting Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and severe-combined immunodeficiency, an illness in which the immune system is crippled. Chromosome 20 contains 727 genes and accounts for about 2% of the total human genetic material, the team reported in the Dec. 20 issue of Nature.
SCIENCE
October 11, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Scientists have confirmed the second case of a "virgin birth" in a shark. In a study reported Friday in the Journal of Fish Biology, scientists said DNA testing showed that a pup carried by an Atlantic blacktip shark at the Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center contained no genetic material from a male. In 2007, the female shark died of complications from an unknown pregnancy. Her pup was found during a necropsy. No male blacktips were present in her eight years there.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2014 | By David Pierson and Tiffany Hsu
Come grilling season, expect your sirloin steak to come with a hearty side of sticker shock. Beef prices have reached all-time highs in the U.S. and aren't expected to come down any time soon. Extreme weather has thinned the nation's beef cattle herds to levels last seen in 1951, when there were about half as many mouths to feed in America. "We've seen strong prices before but nothing this extreme," said Dennis Smith, a commodities broker for Archer Financial Services in Chicago.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Scientists at Texas A&M University in College Station unveiled a disease-resistant black Angus bull, saying it could lead to safer beef and more efficient ranching worldwide. The month-old calf, called Bull 86 Squared, was cloned from genetic material frozen 15 years ago from Bull 86.
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