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Genetic Material

NEWS
February 6, 1992 | From Associated Press
Scientists have discovered a genetic abnormality that apparently causes the most common adult form of muscular dystrophy, a discovery that could help research into developing a treatment. The finding also should allow better diagnosis of the inherited condition, called myotonic dystrophy, prenatally or before symptoms appear in later life, experts said. Early diagnosis is important because symptoms may not appear until after a person has had children, unwittingly passing along the flawed gene.
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NEWS
September 24, 1991 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS and TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They did it with primitive computers and jerry-built equipment, without access to technology and information that their counterparts all over the world took for granted--and most likely under the watchful gaze of agents from the Stasi, East Germany's secret police. But since the end of World War II, scientists, researchers and gardeners here have carefully tended a seed bank that most experts rank among the best in the world.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Just when you thought it was safe to go back to the barbecue--bundling your steaks in aluminum foil and keeping fat far from the flames--scientists are surfacing like party poopers with more bad news about grilled meat and cancer. The latest worry is a class of chemicals produced during the cooking of muscle meats like beef, pork, chicken and fish. In laboratory tests and animal studies, the chemicals have been found to damage genetic material and to be carcinogenic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A genetic accident in a single mosquito apparently led to the ability of some mosquitoes around the world to resist a class of insecticides, French researchers reported last week in the journal Nature. The finding may have important implications for programs that use insecticides to control mosquitoes that spread disease. The study investigated why mosquitoes called Culex pipiens can often resist organophosphate insecticides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Surrogate mother Anna L. Johnson said Tuesday that she never expected she would have to forgo a mothering role in the life of the child she agreed to bear for an infertile Orange County couple, even though she signed a contract that prohibited her from trying to have a "parent-child relationship" with the baby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
Scientists have linked two eye diseases to genetic defects in the powerhouses of cells, providing further evidence that damage to such genetic material may cause a variety of illnesses. Emory University researchers in Atlanta reported that they had confirmed that a previously identified flaw in the mitochondrial DNA of cells is to blame for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, a rare inherited disease that causes blindness. In the same issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, another scientific team last week linked damage to the same kind of genetic material to a disorder called progressive external ophthalmoplegia, which weakens eye muscles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Researchers at Amgen Inc. of Thousand Oaks have developed an effective new method of inserting new genetic information into chicken eggs so that it will be passed on to succeeding generations. One benefit of the development may be a new path to production of genetically engineered drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Three years ago, in an alfalfa field somewhere in San Diego, a San Diego-based biotechnology company apparently brushed against the fringes of the rules regulating the release of genetically engineered bacteria into the environment. Scientists at Westbridge Research Group, located on Scripps Lake Drive, injected a new bacterium into alfalfa seeds that were subsequently planted in test plots in San Diego, Nebraska, Montana, and South Dakota.
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