Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGenetic Research
IN THE NEWS

Genetic Research

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2000
The announcement by President Clinton and Prime Minister Tony Blair that the sequence of the human genome should be available to all is welcome news (March 14). The stated purpose is "to improve health around the world and enhance the quality of life for all humankind." Then why not include the rice genome, which is now being sequenced by several private companies? Having this sequence in the public domain and available to scientists around the world may do more to improve human health and the quality of life of billions of people and will do so at a much lower cost.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
June 22, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
Does depth perception develop in humans as a result of nature or nurture? It's a question scientists have wondered about. And a new study comes to a surprising conclusion: Babies acquire binocular vision as a result of viewing the world around them, not merely thanks to genetic programming. "My guess was that it was going to be something in between nature and nurture," said study leader Ilona Kovacs, a psychologist at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics in Hungary.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 3, 1989
The L.K. Whittier Foundation of South Pasadena has awarded $800,000 to Caltech in support of DNA diagnostics research. Leroy Hood, professor of biology, heads the research team, which has developed a new DNA diagnostics procedure that distinguishes normal genes from disease-causing genes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Dr. Leena Peltonen, an unusually prolific genetics researcher whose team discovered mutated genes responsible for 15 inherited diseases and who established the department of human genetics at UCLA, died of cancer March 11 at her home in Finland. She was 57. Her "contribution to understanding the genetics of human disease has been a lifelong commitment and is simply outstanding," said Allan Bradley, director of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in England, where Peltonen ended her career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A fire that tore through laboratories at UC Santa Cruz has destroyed valuable genetic research that took years to develop, officials said. The fire broke out early Friday on the fourth floor of Sinsheimer Laboratories, the campus' primary biology building. It later flared up twice more, said the university's Fire Chief Charles Hernandez. At one point, as many as 65 firefighters and 15 engines fought the blaze, campus officials said. No injuries were reported.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
UC Irvine researchers report that they have identified a genetic abnormality they believe causes spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of death in infants. "This is a long-anticipated finding that should quickly improve accuracy in diagnosis of the forms of SMA," said Donald S. Wood, director of science technology for the Muscular Dystrophy Assn. "Most important, it will accelerate our continuing search for a form of treatment for SMA." No treatment now exists.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1995 | SUSAN HIGHTOWER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
EagleCrest Ranch Inc. has more than 500 Simbrah cattle on 1,000 acres near this burg 71 miles from Dallas. But any resemblance to the old Wild West ends there. * EagleCrest uses an office in north Dallas and employs sophisticated computer-driven genetic research to develop its target product--flavorful, tender, all-natural beef with no more than 7% fat. Owner Glen Hinckley sees himself not as a traditional rancher, but as a businessman targeting a specific, lucrative market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1991 | HARRY V. VINTERS, Dr. Harry V. Vinters is an associate professor of pathology and a member of the Brain Research Institute at UCLA Medical Center
The announcements come now by the dozen--a new gene for a human disease has been discovered, isolated or cloned. Huntington's chorea. Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Cystic fibrosis. A gene that predisposes to or protects from tumors of the bowel or some other form of cancer. The gene thought to be responsible for the degenerative condition ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease). Genes for common diseases, genes for rare ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1998 | KRISTEN MOULTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
What do you get when you pair a Mormon's affinity for big families and genealogy with his enthusiasm for advancing science? A geneticist's dream come true: a welcome at Utah family reunions. Where else can a researcher collect 200 blood samples in one day to learn whether premature labor or an infant's enlarged heart runs in a family, asks Ken Ward, an obstetrician and geneticist at the University of Utah.
NEWS
September 23, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Do some people carry a "genetic marker" that predisposes them toward crime and violence? Without the fanfare or controversy that surrounded an aborted 1992 conference to debate that question, dozens of scholars gathered here Friday to resume their emotional and academic sparring on one of the most sensitive issues in criminology and social science.
NATIONAL
April 14, 2009 | Trine Tsouderos
Nobody knows Bo like geneticists know Bo. The Obamas may have accepted Bo the Portuguese water dog as First Puppy because of the breed's hypoallergenic coat, but the dogs are also the most genetically studied breed in the world. Thanks to their remarkable history, the dogs have been the source of key insights into the function of certain canine genes, including determining a dog's size and whether it is susceptible to a devastating disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Victor A. McKusick, the Johns Hopkins University physician who is widely regarded as the father of medical genetics, died Tuesday at his home in Baltimore. He was 86 and died of complications from cancer. McKusick was a pioneer in linking diseases to specific genes and began the first database of gene functions, a repository that now includes more than 18,000 human genes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
David D. Perkins and Dorothy "Dot" Newmeyer Perkins, a husband-and-wife research team at Stanford University who were inseparable in the laboratory, proved inseparable in death as well, dying within days of each other this month. Perkins, a pioneer in the use of the orange mold Neurospora crassa for studying genetics and cellular metabolism, died Jan. 2 at Stanford Hospital at age 87 after a short illness, the university announced this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2006 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
WHEN we last heard from Michael Crichton, he had grown a giant-size petri dish full of controversy with his 2004 novel, "State of Fear," the premise of which was that global warming was a hoax used to justify acts of eco-terrorism. The White House cozied up to Crichton and his ideas; most scientists in the field were unimpressed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2003 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Eve was a clone. The fact that Adam's rib is said to have produced a female, rather than another male, might suggest merely the precariousness of genetic mutation. At the Williamson Gallery at Art Center College of Design, "Paradise Now: Picturing the Genetic Revolution" assembles work from the past decade by 35 artists that riffs on the contemporary phenomenon of genetic research, engineering and manipulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2003 | Scott Martelle, Times staff writer
If this were a documentary, the working title would be "Sex and the Single Sea Urchin: Just Another Day at the Beach," and it would start off with an old-style newsreel. Opening scene: Flickering black-and-white images of a laboratory at Columbia University in New York City nearly a century ago. Noted biologist Thomas Hunt Morgan peers through a magnifying glass at a jar of fruit flies, which produce new generations every 12 days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1998
In your Nov. 9 editorial on the subject of laws applicable to stem cell research, you suggest that "Congress should consult with people like Francis Collins, a devout Christian and director of human genetic research at the National Institutes of Health." You suggest no other sources of sound advice for our lawmakers. Collins' moral and professional credentials notwithstanding, your implication that only a "devout Christian" can provide guidance on genetic research worthy of congressional attention is offensive.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1997 | BARBARA MURPHY
Amgen Inc. has named Lawrence M. Souza, who helped develop one of the company's two main products, senior vice president of research. Souza has a doctorate in molecular biology and previously served as vice president for molecular and cellular biology. He succeeds Daniel Vapnek, who announced his retirement from the giant Thousand Oaks biotechnology company last June.
SCIENCE
August 16, 2002 | From Associated Press
J. Craig Venter, whose former company spent two years mapping human DNA, unveiled plans Wednesday to open a research center that will be capable of decoding a person's genes in seconds. He said he hopes the DNA sequencing, which now can take months and costs millions of dollars, will be done for about $1,000. Making it widely available could help doctors predict what diseases patients may face and treat problems before they arise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A fire that tore through laboratories at UC Santa Cruz has destroyed valuable genetic research that took years to develop, officials said. The fire broke out early Friday on the fourth floor of Sinsheimer Laboratories, the campus' primary biology building. It later flared up twice more, said the university's Fire Chief Charles Hernandez. At one point, as many as 65 firefighters and 15 engines fought the blaze, campus officials said. No injuries were reported.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|