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NEWS
September 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
In the first ruling of its kind in Kenya, a court has fined 20 parents for forcing their daughters to undergo genital excisions, a newspaper in Nairobi, the capital, reported. The parents pleaded guilty to assault charges. The parents were each fined about $25--Kenya's average monthly wage--or, if they failed to pay, two months in jail, the newspaper said. Female genital excision, legal in Kenya, is common practice in some of the nation's many tribes.
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WORLD
April 22, 2014 | By Laura King
DEYARB BOQTARES, Egypt - By all accounts, Soheir Bataa was a bright and lively girl. At 13, she was diligent in her schoolwork, with her math teacher recalling an eager pupil. On her run-down street in this Nile Delta village, she could often be seen hoisting a neighborhood toddler onto a skinny hip. Until her parents decided that Soheir would be taken to a nearby clinic - really just the upper floor of a house on a dead-end dirt lane - where a doctor who doubled as a mosque preacher was known for performing a procedure called thara . The term, alluding to cleansing or purifying, means the cutting away of a girl's external genitalia.
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WORLD
May 23, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — A South African art gallery that displayed a controversial painting showing the country's president with his genitals exposed announced Tuesday that it was closing its doors temporarily because of threats. The decision came after vandals defaced the artwork earlier in the day. Lara Koseff, spokeswoman for the Goodman Gallery, said there had been numerous threats made against the gallery after its display of "The Spear," by Cape Town artist Brett Murray.
WORLD
May 23, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — A South African art gallery that displayed a controversial painting showing the country's president with his genitals exposed announced Tuesday that it was closing its doors temporarily because of threats. The decision came after vandals defaced the artwork earlier in the day. Lara Koseff, spokeswoman for the Goodman Gallery, said there had been numerous threats made against the gallery after its display of "The Spear," by Cape Town artist Brett Murray.
NEWS
April 30, 1996 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As her hearing before a high-level immigration board approaches, a young woman who fled her native Togo because of the threat of forced genital mutilation seems likely to gain sympathetic treatment in a plea for political asylum here. Fauziya Kasinga, 19, will present her case to the U.S. Board of Immigration Appeals on Thursday. Her attorneys will ask the board to grant her the asylum refused last year by a lower court or at least remand her case for a fuller hearing before the same judge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1990 | Compiled from Times Wire and Staff Reports
Men who frequently sunbathe nude using ultraviolet lamps substantially increase their risk of developing a rare and potentially fatal genital cancer, according to a new study published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study shows that the penis is particularly susceptible to the carcinogenic effects of sunlight, and it advised men who are frequently exposed to ultraviolet radiation in tanning salons, on the beach, or for therapeutic purposes to protect themselves.
BOOKS
May 19, 1991
D'Souza sounds in his excerpt like the prototype for all the Sam Kinnisons of academe who throw themselves into a collective shriek at the mention of the canon. While they pound the floor and yell something about picking up their list and staying home, the rest of us wonder why they pick up the pen instead of the pacifier. Then again, maybe chronic confusion of intellect with genitals makes them equate a new idea with castration. In that case, we can understand their frustration, poor dears, and when the tantrum's over, maybe they'd like to join the rest of us in the real work of education: living together honorably through understanding.
NEWS
April 2, 1986 | United Press International
Hundreds of eunuchs who were former servants in the harems of India's princes have gathered in the central city of Bhopal to elect a national leader for the first time in 80 years, organizers said today. Surayya Bai, a spokesman for the eunuchs, said it was the first time since 1906 that such a conference has been convened, and only the third time in the last 160 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1991 | HOWARD BLUME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Alhambra Municipal Court judge Wednesday ordered a Montebello high school teacher held for trial on three counts of oral copulation with a 17-year-old boy and reduced his $1-million bail. Outside the courtroom, the attorney for teacher Harry Christ Manos said he could prove that the most dramatic evidence found in Manos' Alhambra home, a glass jar containing severed male genitals, was merely a gag gift obtained from a medical school cadaver.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 1992 | M.E. WARREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like the dream world it seeks to investigate, Lawrence Beiderman's "1/3: a series of rapid 'I' movements," playing in the Fine Arts Studio Theatre at UC Irvine, travels a wide variety of imaginative turf. Seductive, talking whales, Play-Doh genitals and cartoon characters who escape the television set are just a few of the images that appear in a series of surrealistic vignettes that ostensibly illuminate the deeper psyches of the six protagonists.
NEWS
October 22, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Call it an antiviral one-two punch. An HIV-fighting drug has been shown to be even more effective against genital herpes when it's applied as a gel, new research shows. A study released this week by the journal Cell Host & Microbe that tested the gel on women in South Africa (where the risk of HIV and herpes is great) found that the anti-HIV/AIDS drug tenofovir reduced herpes infections by 51% and HIV infections by 39%. In human tissue, the drug inhibits enzymes that the virus needs in order to replicate.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
The decision by Texas Gov. Rick Perry to revive legislation that would criminalize "intrusive" pat-downs by airport security drew expected praise from grass-roots conservatives, rankled opponents who called it political pandering and reignited threats from federal officials of grounded flights in the state. But it may not even come to a vote. HB 41, which would make it a crime for federal agents to touch a person's anus, genitals, buttocks or breasts without probable cause, is at peril of dying in the state House, as Republican Speaker Joe Straus has pledged not to consider it in its current state.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. Genital herpes is a common sexually transmitted disease, affecting about 16% of U.S. adults. A lot of people, however, don't have outbreaks of painful blisters and don't know they have the infection. Others know they have herpes but believe they can't transmit it to a sexual partner unless they're experiencing symptoms. A study published Tuesday paints a far more complex portrait of genital herpes, also called herpes simplex virus type 2. researchers conducted one of the largest studies to date of people who test positive for herpes type 2. Some of the participants had occasional symptoms of herpes, and others were always asymptomatic.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times, Tribune staff reporter
Genital herpes is a common sexually transmitted disease, affecting about 16% of U.S. adults. A lot of people, however, don't have outbreaks of painful blisters and don't know they have the infection. Others know they have herpes but believe they can't transmit it to a sexual partner unless they're experiencing symptoms. A study published Tuesday paints a far more complex portrait of genital herpes, also called herpes simplex virus type 2. researchers conducted one of the largest studies to date of people who test positive for herpes type 2. Some of the participants had occasional symptoms of herpes, and others were always asymptomatic.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2010 | By Brian Bennett and Jordan Steffen, Tribune Washington Bureau
The head of the Transportation Security Administration refused to back down from using aggressive pat-downs and full-body scans at airports, telling a Senate committee on Wednesday that the screenings were necessary to protect the nation's fliers. TSA Director John Pistole said the pat-downs, which include searches of passengers' genital areas, and scanners that reveal nude images of their bodies would have found the explosives on an alleged would-be airline bomber last Christmas Day. Umar Abdulmutallab is accused of boarding a flight bound for Detroit with explosives in his underwear that went undetected by metal detectors.
NEWS
September 30, 2010
An experimental vaccine designed to block genital transmission of herpes viruses from men to women has failed a major clinical trial aimed at obtaining manufacturing approval, researchers said Thursday. Because of the failure, the vaccine's manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline, said it will abandon any further attempts to develop the vaccine, called Simplirix. The vaccine was designed to protect against the two major herpes simplex viruses, HSV-1 and HSV-2. HSV-1 is the primary cause of cold sores, while HSV-2 is the primary cause of genital herpes.
NEWS
April 11, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The federal Board of Immigration Appeals will conduct a hearing next month into the case of Fauziya Kasinga, a young women from Togo who is seeking asylum in the United States on grounds she has been threatened with genital mutilation in her African nation. The hearing had been set for Wednesday. Karen Musalo of American University, who is representing Kasinga, has argued that the United Nations considers this tribal ritual a human rights violation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Scientists at the Australian research organization CSIRO have developed a new instrument that they say revolutionizes classification of insects by inflating their genitalia. The vesica everter, more commonly known as a phalloblaster, uses a stream of pressurized alcohol to dehydrate and harden the genitalia, which then remain inflated like a balloon.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
Most men with genital piercings don't fit into the usual stereotype of bikers, druggies or Goths, researchers said Monday. In fact, most who responded to a survey are nearly middle-aged, middle class married men, according to an online study performed by researchers from Texas Tech University. Men report many reasons for piercings, including increased sexual satisfaction, a need for rebellion and a desire for risk-taking. But they also endure a variety of complications, particularly infections and bleeding.
OPINION
May 29, 2010
Late last month, 330 villages in Senegal held a ceremony to announce that they would end the practice of female genital cutting. That brought the number of Senegalese communities to abandon the practice to 4,229, and when the number reaches 5,000, complete eradication will be achieved. Similar pronunciations and celebrations are occurring in other countries — in Gambia and Somalia, and in Mauritania, where on Tuesday 78 villages participated. The growing movement to end the ancient practice of slicing off part or all of a girl's clitoris and/or labia — historically done to prepare her for adulthood and marriage — is the result of years of work by local and international activists.
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