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ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
IT is altogether fitting that the socially progressive Ousmane Sembene, the father of the sub-Saharan cinema, would, with his superb ""Moolaade," make an eloquent protest against the archaic tradition of female "circumcision." It is still practiced in 38 of the 54 African nations recognized by the United Nations, putting at risk an estimated 2 million girls annually, according to the World Health Organization.
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HEALTH
January 19, 1998 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even in the sexually permissive '70s, the afflicted often kept quiet. Having genital herpes, after all, was akin to being a social leper. Then along came HIV, which can lead to AIDS, making herpes pale in comparison and pushing it out of our collective consciousness. But the herpes epidemic, far from being over, is getting worse. Today, roughly one in five Americans over age 12--or about 45 million people--is thought to have genital herpes, although most are unaware they have it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2004 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
The day after arresting a self-described "body modification artist" for allegedly conspiring to perform genital mutilations on two girls, federal authorities said they have found no evidence that he had ever done the procedure. But prosecutors say they believe they have enough evidence to prove that Todd Cameron Bertrang, 41, and his companion Robyn Faulkinbury, 24, both of Santa Clarita, illegally conspired to break the federal ban on such procedures.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2008 | Robert Lloyd, Times Television Critic
“Testees” is a new situation comedy from FX. Its title is a pun. It debuts tonight. Kenny Hotz created it. He is the Kenny of “Kenny vs. Spenny,” a Comedy Central reality show in which Hotz and his friend Spencer Rice compete with each other to see, for instance, Who Can Sit on a Cow the Longest, Who Makes the Most Convincing Woman, Who Can Smoke More Weed and Who Can Lift the Most Weight with His Genitals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1993 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A little-known, infrequently discussed sexually transmitted disease is coming out of the shadows at Southern California universities, including three campuses in Orange County and at UCLA and USC. Physicians at university health centers say the topic is not pleasant. Even the name of the disease--genital warts--brings nervous reactions from students, the doctors said.
NATIONAL
May 27, 2005 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Scientists studying the effects of hormone-mimicking chemicals on humans have reported that compounds called phthalates, used in plastics and beauty products and widely found in people, seem to alter the reproductive organs of baby boys. In the first study of humans exposed in the womb to phthalates, the researchers, who examined the genitalia of male babies and toddlers, found a strong relationship between the chemicals and subtle changes in the size and anatomy of the children's genitals.
NEWS
December 15, 2001 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kenyan women this week won a 20-year battle to outlaw genital excision of young girls, but doubts remain over whether the government will vigorously enforce the ban. Even after President Daniel Arap Moi promised to sign legislation criminalizing the practice, many parents defied him by subjecting their daughters to the procedure.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court on Thursday let stand a novel ruling allowing a homeowner's insurer to be held liable for damages obtained against a policyholder accused of infecting his girlfriend with genital herpes. In a brief order, the justices refused to hear a challenge by State Farm Fire & Casualty Co. to a decision issued last March by a state Court of Appeal in San Jose.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | JILL LAWRENCE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lydia Oluloro won't have to make the choice she dreaded: Returning to Nigeria alone, or returning with her young daughters, which would put them at great risk of genital mutilation. A judge in Seattle dropped deportation proceedings against her last week, ruling that it was more important to spare her daughters from mutilation than to respect ancient rituals. Oluloro, 32, is in the country illegally; her children are American citizens. U.S.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2005 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A woman who has been subjected to genital mutilation is automatically eligible for asylum in the United States, the federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled Thursday. The decision is the second this week from the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals that has broadened asylum rights. Earlier, the court ruled in favor of asylum claims for men whose wives were subject to forced sterilizations.
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