Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGennady I Yanayev
IN THE NEWS

Gennady I Yanayev

BUSINESS
August 21, 1991 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Visiting Soviet businessmen, engineers and a legal adviser assured their American counterparts Tuesday that it is still safe to start business ventures in the Soviet Union despite the sudden political upheaval. "Foreign trade relations will be kept . . .
Advertisement
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having seized power to save the Soviet Union from what they see as chaos and collapse, the country's new conservative leaders must now show how ruthless they will be in using that power. As Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin called for a nationwide strike in opposition to the putsch, and crowds of Muscovites surrounded the tanks deployed in the capital, the self-proclaimed State Committee on the Emergency Situation faced an immediate challenge on Monday.
NEWS
August 20, 1991
Vladimir I. Lenin (1917-1924) Leader of the Bolshevik Revolution and founding father of the modern Soviet state. Died in office, Jan. 21, 1924. Josef Stalin (1924-1953) Pushed aside or liquidated all competitors for power and reigned as unquestioned dictator, installing through bloody purges and forced collectivization the highly centralized economic structure that has characterized the Soviet Union through most of its Communist history. Died in office March 5, 1953. Nikita S.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Bush Administration officials insist that it is too early to make a final judgment, the coup in the Soviet Union seems to have dashed hopes for an early Arab-Israeli peace conference, Middle East experts said Monday. The Soviet Union had been scheduled to serve as co-host with the United States for a conference in October that U.S. officials envisioned as the forum for an unprecedented series of face-to-face negotiations between Israel and its Arab adversaries.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His prescience may not help him be confirmed as CIA director, but Monday's coup against Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev does confirm Robert M. Gates' reputation: the Bush Administration's in-house pessimist was right. So was Alexander N. Yakovlev, Gorbachev's former top aide who quit the Soviet Communist Party on Friday warning that a hard-line coup was in the works. But for the legions of American Sovietologists the record is mixed.
NEWS
August 20, 1991
Here's a look at some of the Soviet Union's domestic and international problems, exacerbated by the ouster of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev: The Home Front: Baltics: A Soviet military official said he has assumed control of the secessionist republics of Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia. The military reportedly moved on Estonia and Lithuania. Russia: The Russian Federation, the nation's largest republic, wants self-determination. Its president, Boris N.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
Here is Vice President Gennady I. Yanayev's statement announcing to world leaders that he had taken over the Soviet presidency from Mikhail S. Gorbachev: At the instruction of the Soviet leadership, I hereby notify that a state of emergency is introduced in individual localities of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics for a period of six months from Aug. 19, 1991, in keeping with the constitution and laws of the U.S.S.R.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The conservative coup that ousted Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has brought to a sudden halt wide-ranging international efforts to integrate the Soviet Union into the modern global economy. On Monday, senior officials in the United States and other major Western powers issued warnings that they are likely to freeze current Soviet aid programs, as well as their plans to expand trade and investment ties with Moscow, if the coup brings democratic reforms to an end.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stunned by the ouster of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, members of Congress said Monday that they are likely to resist any efforts by President Bush to win their approval of U.S-Soviet trade and arms reduction agreements. Some members of Congress also suggested that the coup could cause them to reconsider Bush's requests for cuts in defense spending.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The confused and ominous events in the Soviet Union are a setback for the long-suffering Soviet people and a blow to investment plans of U.S. business, but on the whole not a catastrophe--yet. If there are fighting and bloodshed in the coming days, that assessment would change, of course. But as of Monday, U.S. companies and experts on the Soviet economy were reacting coolly to the ouster of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev by forces including the Soviet military and KGB.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|